Tag Archives: turnout

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Nov. 30, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


During the final interim meeting of the Senate Education Committee on Tuesday, lawmakers discussed mandate relief and innovation, the Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) program, and educator misconduct. Members of a working group of policy stakeholders, which included ATPE, agreed to send 20 recommendations to be considered during the 86th legislative session next year. ATPE member Aletha Williams testified on the need for mentors in the teaching profession in order to help retain employees. The committee also discussed implementation of Senate Bill (SB) 7, an educator misconduct bill passed last session, and discussed the possibility of creating a “Do Not Hire Registry”  for educators who have previously engaged in misconduct. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann provides more information in this blog post.

 


School finance commission working group meeting, Nov. 27, 2018.

The Texas Commission on Public School Finance working group on revenue met Tuesday to finalize its recommendations before they’re presented to the full commission. The group debated the merits of recapture, often referred to more commonly as “Robin Hood,” the mechanism by which the state redistributes funds from property-rich districts to property-poor districts. While Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston), who chairs the group, expressed his desire to do away with recapture, others such as Rep. Diego Bernal (D -San Antonio) and Rep. Ken King (R – Canadian) questioned how equity could be preserved without the program or how Texas could implement a “sharing” system among recaptured funds. Ultimately the working group voted to advance the governor’s tax cap plan, which would increase funding for schools that improve outcomes and cap property tax growth at 2.5 percent, as well as Bettencourt’s recapture “sharing” plan to the full commission.

The full commission is meeting today and will meet at least twice more in December to receive recommendations from the working groups and finalize its report to the legislature. A more detailed account of Tuesday’s meeting can be found in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


According to data from the Texas Secretary of State, more than 7 million registered voters in the state did not participate in the midterm elections earlier this month. Members of the Texas Educators Vote coalition, including ATPE, are working to change that.The group aims to create a culture of voting in schools and communities and demonstrate how rewarding and easy it can be to for ordinary people to perform their civic duty. You can help their efforts by participating in this voter registration survey that asks educators to share details on their involvement in get-out-the-vote (GOTV) efforts and, specifically, efforts to help eligible students become registered to vote. The survey provides information to the Texas Civil Rights Project, which creates a map of high schools where students are registered to vote. Submissions must be completed by 5 pm on Friday, December 7.

 


ATPE Lobbyists Monty Exter and Kate Kuhlmann and GR Director Jennifer Mitchell met with visiting education experts from Armenia on Nov. 30, 2019, at the ATPE state office.

Members of the ATPE lobby team had the privilege of meeting today with a delegation from Armenia to discuss education issues, including school funding, recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers, and the role of educator associations in advancing the education profession.

The group is visiting the United States as part of the U.S. State Department’s Visitor Leadership Program, which fosters citizen-to-citizen diplomacy for emerging leaders and coordinates opportunities for cross-cultural sharing between dignitaries from over 90 countries. The program was formed shortly after WWII and boasts such famous alumni as Tony Blair, Anwar Sadat, Margaret Thatcher, Nicolas Sarkozy, Indira Gandhi, and others.

During their visit to Texas, the education experts from Armenia also met with representatives of the Texas Education Agency and visited local schools. Other cities they will visit during their trip to the U.S. include San Antonio, plus Pensacola, Florida, Cleveland, Ohio, Boston, Massachusetts, and Washington, DC. Representing ATPE during today’s meeting were Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell and lobbyists Monty Exter and Kate Kuhlmann.

 


12 Days of Voting: Turnout

Early voting is underway NOW for the November 6 elections, so we’re taking a look at some of the reasons why it’s so important that educators vote TODAY! In this post, we’re taking a closer look at voter turnout.


It may sound funny, but when you cast your ballot this week, you’re not just voting for yourself.

You first have to understand that Texas voter turnout is unfortunately pretty abysmal. Even in big election years like the 2016 Presidential Election, only 59 percent of registered voters in Texas actually voted. That’s barely more than half!

In effect, the half that voted made the decision for the half who could have voted, but chose to stay home.

When there’s no race for president, the numbers look even worse – especially when it comes to primaries. Just 10 percent of registered voters participated in the 2018 Republican Primary, while seven percent participated in the Democratic Primary. Turnout for the runoffs that followed ranged between one and three percent. Yikes!!!

Imagine – just one percent deciding races that will affect all 28 million people living in Texas. According to the math, each of those voters would effectively do the choosing for 183 people!!!

Turnout for the last midterm elections in 2014 was just 34 percent, and if turnout is the same this year, then each voter will be speaking for about five other Texas residents. If you don’t vote, you don’t get to complain!

ATPE state officers met with Speaker Joe Straus in March 2017.

With Texas House Speaker Joe Straus (R-San Antonio) retiring, the first order of business when the next legislature convenes in January 2019 will be for members of the House to elect a new speaker. Will the 150 members elected next week choose a leader who, like Straus, works to increase public education funding and defend kids and classrooms against harmful legislation? Or will they choose someone who will lower the gates to vouchers bills and declare open season on educators?

It all depends on the outcome of this election.

How much so? According to election news website txelects.com, organizations devoted to defunding and privatizing public schools spent more than a million dollars fighting public education allies in runoff races. These groups accounted for more than a third of the $3.3 million total raised by all candidates in the Republican runoffs. Would you spend a million dollars if you didn’t think you’d get something in return?

The people who want to privatize public schools aren’t sitting this election out. That means educators can’t afford to either.


Go to the CANDIDATES section of our Teach the Vote website to find out where officeholders and candidates in your area stand on this and other public education issues.

Remind your colleagues also about the importance of voting and making informed choices at the polls. While it is illegal to use school district resources (like your work e-mail) to communicate information that supports or opposes specific candidates or ballot measures, there is NO prohibition on sharing nonpartisan resources and general “get out of the vote” reminders about the election.

Early voting in the 2018 general election runs Monday, October 22, through Friday, November 2. Election Day is November 6, but there’s no reason to wait. Get out there and use your educator voice by casting your vote TODAY!

Educators: Your runoff vote could be your most impactful!

Early voting is currently underway in the 2018 Runoff Elections, with Election Day set for May 22. Believe it or not, this is your chance to have the biggest impact on any race this year!

Wait, how’s that possible?

First, understand that Texas voter turnout is unfortunately pretty abysmal. Even in big election years like the 2016 Presidential Election, only 59 percent of registered voters in Texas came out to cast their ballot. That’s barely more than half! In effect, the half that voted made the decision for the half who could have voted, but chose to stay home.

When there’s no race for president, the numbers look even worse – especially when it comes to primaries. Just 10 percent of registered voters participated in the 2018 Republican Primary, while seven percent participated in the Democratic Primary. As of Tuesday, turnout for early voting in the 2018 Runoff Elections among the state’s most populous counties was just 1.7 percent of registered voters.

Imagine – that 1.7 percent will end up deciding races that will affect all 28 million people living in Texas. According to the math, each of those voters effectively spoke for 139 people. All that is to say that if you want your single vote to have an impact, now is the time to cast it!

So why is that vote important? There are plenty of reasons.

With Speaker Joe Straus (R-San Antonio) retiring, the first order of business when the next legislature convenes in January 2019 will be to elect a new speaker. Will members choose a leader who, like Straus, works to increase public education funding and defend kids and classrooms against harmful legislation proposed by the lieutenant governor? Or will they choose someone who will lower the gates to vouchers bills and declare open season on educators? The runoffs will certainly make an impact on that vote.

How much so? According to election news website txelects.com, organizations devoted to defunding and privatizing public schools have spent more than a million dollars fighting public education allies in runoff races. These groups accounted for more than a third of the $3.3 million total raised by all candidates in the Republican runoffs. Would you spend a million dollars if you didn’t think you’d get something in return?

Now you see why it’s more important than ever that you vote in the runoff elections underway now. If you voted in the 2018 Primary Elections, then you’re eligible to vote in the runoff for whatever party you voted with back in March. If you didn’t vote in the March primaries, that’s okay! You can vote in whichever party’s runoff election you like!

To find out more about who’s on the ballot in your area, click on the CANDIDATES page here at TeachTheVote.org. Now get out there and use your teacher voice!