Tag Archives: Texas Educators Vote

Texas election news roundup

It’s another week and another round of election news in Texas.

Gov. Greg Abbott (R-Texas) has been busy setting special elections to finish the unexpired terms of legislators who have decided to step down before the next election. Voters will decide who succeeds state Reps. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) and Eric Johnson (D-Dallas) on November 5, 2019, which is also the date of the state constitutional election. The winners of those two races will have to turn around and defend their seats in the 2020 elections next year.

In the meantime, another Democrat has filed to run against U.S. Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) in the 2020 election. Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez is a Latina organizer who started the Workers Defense Project and Jolt Texas, the latter of which aims to mobilize young Hispanic voters. Ramirez will join a Democratic field that already includes state Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas), former congressional candidate MJ Hegar, and former congressman and gubernatorial candidate Chris Bell.

Finally, Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) Member Ruben Cortez (D-Brownsville) announced plans late last week to challenge state Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville), who has often sided with his Republican colleagues in the 31-member Texas Senate on issues such as school privatization. This sets up a potentially heated Democratic primary for the South Texas Senate district.

This November’s election will decide a number of important potential amendments to the Texas Constitution, including one relating to school finance. It is critical that educators stay engaged beginning this November and following through the party primaries in March 2020 — all the way to the November 2020 general election. Now is a good time to check if you’re registered to vote, which you can do by using resources put together by the Texas Educators Vote coalition of which ATPE is a member. Check out the coalition’s new website at TexasEducatorsVote.com.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 2, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


With the passage of major bills like House Bill 3 on school finance and reform and House Bill 3906 on student testing during the recently concluded 86th legislative session, educators and other members of the public will have opportunities to serve on advisory committees as the bills are implemented. In correspondence to school administrators this week, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced a call for nominations to serve on the following five advisory committees, along with deadlines for nominations as shown below:

  • Reading Standards K-3 Advisory Committee – August 7, 2019
  • Special Education Allotment Advisory Committee – September 1, 2019
  • Compensatory Education Allotment Advisory Committee – August 12, 2019
  • Financial Aid Advisory Committee – June 1, 2020
  • Assessment Educator Advisory Committee – August 16,2019

Find more information on the committees, their requirements, and time commitments here.


Earlier this year, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced its launch of a resource website along with other explanatory materials aimed at helping the public understand House Bill 3, the school finance reform bill that passed during the 2019 regular legislative session this year. The latest releases in TEA’s video series entitled “HB 3 in 30” cover recapture and the move to current year property values and use of the fast growth allotment for purposes of school funding. Check out the latest TEA videos here.


ELECTION UPDATE:

This week saw another round of important developments concerning the 2020 elections, as ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins reports this week. State Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) announced he is retiring from the Texas Legislature, where he chaired the House Appropriations Committee for the past two sessions. As the chief budget writer in the House, the appropriations chair is second only to the speaker in terms of political power, which makes Rep. Zerwas’s announcement significant. Zerwas won reelection against Democrat Meghan Scoggins by an eight percent margin in 2018, which puts his House District 28 among those considered “in play” in the 2020 general election.

U.S. Rep. Will Hurd (R-San Antonio) also announced this week he will not seek reelection to Congress. This announcement sent shockwaves through the national Republican Party, which has benefitted from Rep. Hurd’s ability to win in what is considered a Democratic-leaning congressional district. Hurd is also the only African-American Republican in the U.S. House. His retirement increases the prospects for Democrats hoping to take Congressional District 23 in 2020.

Even though the 2020 election seems far away, it’s important to remember that primary races are coming in March. The primary elections are still the races in which most of the political posts in Texas are decided. Texas Educators Vote, a coalition of public education supporters that includes ATPE, has launched a new website with information about how and where to vote. Check it out at TexasEducatorsVote.com and sign up to receive text and e-mail updates about election dates and information.


In case you missed our blog reporting last weekend, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met on July 26, 2019. Much of the meeting was devoted to consideration of rules to implement bills passed during the 86th legislative session that concluded earlier this year. Among the items on SBEC’s lengthy agenda were the plans for piloting of EdTPA portfolio assessments for educator certification, final adoption of changes to teacher assignment rules, and proposed modifications to requirements for admission to an educator preparation program.

For more on actions taken by the board in last week’s meeting, check out this comprehensive blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


 

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 26, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


This week Congressman Kevin Brady (R-TX) filed H.R. 3934, the “Equal Treatment of Public Servants Act of 2019.” The ETPSA aims to address unfair reductions to the Social Security benefits for many educators and other public employees under what is known as the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP).

While there are many similarities between this WEP replacement bill and a previous version of the ETPSA filed by Brady in the last congress, H.R. 3934 would produce a higher benefit payment for the majority of retirees, including those future retirees who are over the age of 20. For more details on the newly filed bill, check out this blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


Today, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is meeting to discuss several important items, including the adoption of changes to allow for the implementation of the EdTPA portfolio assessment pilot for teacher certification. The board is also discussing pending rule changes resulting from bills passed by the 86th Legislature, such as the repeal of the Master Teacher certificates within HB 3. Check the Teach the Vote blog later this weekend for a more detailed summary of the meeting by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


ELECTION UPDATE: November is right around the corner. Are you registered and ready to vote? This week the Secretary of State revealed the ballot order for constitutional amendments that voters will consider in November 2019, including one that pertains to education funding. Learn more about the proposed amendment, along with updates on campaign announcements for the 2020 primary elections in this new election update post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


In Washington, DC, the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs held a hearing on school safety on Thursday, July 25, 2019. The specific focus of yesterday’s hearing was on examining state and federal recommendations for enhancing school safety against targeted violence. The committee heard from four invited witnesses: Max Schachter and Tom Hoyer, who are both parents of children killed in the Parkland School shooting; Bob Gualtieri, Sheriff of Pinellas County, Florida; and Deborah Temkin, PH.D., Senior Program Area Director, Education Child Trends. Mr. Hoyer identified three areas where policymakers can impact school safety, particularly with regard to school shootings: securing the school campus, improving mental health screening and support programs, and supporting responsible firearms ownership. Committee members focused their questions and attention on the first two issues. Archived video of the hearing and the testimony of the individual witnesses can be found at the links above.

November 2019 ballot propositions and other election news

This week saw a steady trickle of election-related news. Some of it had to do with the upcoming constitutional election this November, and some of it had to do with races on the primary election ballot next March 2020.

First up, the Texas Secretary of State announced the ballot order for 10 proposed constitutional amendments that will go before Texas voters this November 5, 2019. Proposition 7 is the measure with the greatest direct impact on public education. House Joint Resolution (HJR) 151 passed by the 86th Texas Legislature describes the measure as “The constitutional amendment allowing increased distributions to the available school fund.”

Proposition 7 would increase the maximum annual distribution of revenue derived from public land by the General Land Office (GLO) or other agency to the available school fund (ASF) for public schools. If approved by voters, that maximum amount would increase from $300 million to $600 million per year. According to the bill’s fiscal note, the Legislative Budget Board was unable to predict whether this would provide enough additional permanent school fund (PSF) revenue to significantly offset state spending from general revenue.

Next up, a couple of familiar names in Texas politics surfaced in relation to federal races on the November 2020 ballot. State Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) announced Monday he plans to enter the Democratic primary to challenge U.S. Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas). West joins a crowded Democratic primary field that includes M.J. Hegar, who narrowly lost a general election race against Republican U.S. Rep. John Carter in Congressional District (CD) 31. Also on Monday, former state Sen. Wendy Davis (D-Fort Worth) announced plans to challenge Republican U.S. Rep. Chip Roy in CD 21. Republican U.S. Rep. Pete Olson announced late Thursday he will not run for reelection in CD 22, which is expected to be a hotly contested race next November. Expect campaign announcements to continue throughout the summer and fall.

As our friends at Texas Educators Vote (TEV) point out, now is a good time to review your voter registration status. Have you moved since the last election? Click here to find out if you’re registered to vote. If you need to update your registration, click here. The deadline to register to vote in this November’s constitutional election is October 7.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Nov. 30, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


During the final interim meeting of the Senate Education Committee on Tuesday, lawmakers discussed mandate relief and innovation, the Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) program, and educator misconduct. Members of a working group of policy stakeholders, which included ATPE, agreed to send 20 recommendations to be considered during the 86th legislative session next year. ATPE member Aletha Williams testified on the need for mentors in the teaching profession in order to help retain employees. The committee also discussed implementation of Senate Bill (SB) 7, an educator misconduct bill passed last session, and discussed the possibility of creating a “Do Not Hire Registry”  for educators who have previously engaged in misconduct. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann provides more information in this blog post.

 


School finance commission working group meeting, Nov. 27, 2018.

The Texas Commission on Public School Finance working group on revenue met Tuesday to finalize its recommendations before they’re presented to the full commission. The group debated the merits of recapture, often referred to more commonly as “Robin Hood,” the mechanism by which the state redistributes funds from property-rich districts to property-poor districts. While Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston), who chairs the group, expressed his desire to do away with recapture, others such as Rep. Diego Bernal (D -San Antonio) and Rep. Ken King (R – Canadian) questioned how equity could be preserved without the program or how Texas could implement a “sharing” system among recaptured funds. Ultimately the working group voted to advance the governor’s tax cap plan, which would increase funding for schools that improve outcomes and cap property tax growth at 2.5 percent, as well as Bettencourt’s recapture “sharing” plan to the full commission.

The full commission is meeting today and will meet at least twice more in December to receive recommendations from the working groups and finalize its report to the legislature. A more detailed account of Tuesday’s meeting can be found in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


According to data from the Texas Secretary of State, more than 7 million registered voters in the state did not participate in the midterm elections earlier this month. Members of the Texas Educators Vote coalition, including ATPE, are working to change that.The group aims to create a culture of voting in schools and communities and demonstrate how rewarding and easy it can be to for ordinary people to perform their civic duty. You can help their efforts by participating in this voter registration survey that asks educators to share details on their involvement in get-out-the-vote (GOTV) efforts and, specifically, efforts to help eligible students become registered to vote. The survey provides information to the Texas Civil Rights Project, which creates a map of high schools where students are registered to vote. Submissions must be completed by 5 pm on Friday, December 7.

 


ATPE Lobbyists Monty Exter and Kate Kuhlmann and GR Director Jennifer Mitchell met with visiting education experts from Armenia on Nov. 30, 2019, at the ATPE state office.

Members of the ATPE lobby team had the privilege of meeting today with a delegation from Armenia to discuss education issues, including school funding, recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers, and the role of educator associations in advancing the education profession.

The group is visiting the United States as part of the U.S. State Department’s Visitor Leadership Program, which fosters citizen-to-citizen diplomacy for emerging leaders and coordinates opportunities for cross-cultural sharing between dignitaries from over 90 countries. The program was formed shortly after WWII and boasts such famous alumni as Tony Blair, Anwar Sadat, Margaret Thatcher, Nicolas Sarkozy, Indira Gandhi, and others.

During their visit to Texas, the education experts from Armenia also met with representatives of the Texas Education Agency and visited local schools. Other cities they will visit during their trip to the U.S. include San Antonio, plus Pensacola, Florida, Cleveland, Ohio, Boston, Massachusetts, and Washington, DC. Representing ATPE during today’s meeting were Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell and lobbyists Monty Exter and Kate Kuhlmann.

 


Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Oct. 26, 2018

During this first week of early voting, here’s your roundup of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Early voting for the 2018 general election began on Monday with Educator Voting Day. Educators were encouraged to the head to the polls and cast their ballots alongside friends, family, and colleagues. Many educators took to social media to share their “I voted” selfies. While there is no tally of how many educators have turned out at the polls thus far, counties across the state are seeing record numbers of voter turnout for early voting in a midterm election.

Educators especially must remember what’s at stake during this election with regard to school funding, teacher pay, retirement benefits, and a myriad of other issues. It is important to go into this election as informed as possible. For more information on candidates, where to find polling places in your county, and what’s needed in order to vote, check out this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

With such a robust start to the early voting period, it’s only fitting that this week end with today’s Student Voting Day. As decreed by Texas Secretary of State Rolando Pablos last October:

The first Friday of the early voting period [is] Student Voting Day in Texas. This is a day when our entire community is called upon to urge and encourage all eligible students in Texas to make their voices heard by casting their ballots at ANY polling location in the county of their registration.

Early voting will continue through Nov. 2. For many voters, this weekend offers the only opportunity to early vote on the weekend. The general election is on Tuesday, Nov. 6. Whether you vote early or on election day, take time to learn about the candidates and build and print out your sample ballot before heading to the polls.


Much attention has been paid nationally to the competitive race for U.S. Senate between incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz and his challenger Congressman Beto O’Rourke, but Texans know that isn’t the only race at issue in this election. Contests for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, and many other down ballot races will be decided in this election, and the outcomes of those contests on Nov. 6 could set the course for education policy in Texas for generations to come. As recent media reports show, educators and public education issues are taking center stage in a number of high-profile races, including statewide contests.

Monty Exter

“The expectation is that teachers just don’t vote,” Exter said. “But I feel like what we’ve been seeing over the last couple of elections is that the enthusiasm and participation of educators is on the rise.” – as reported by the Texas Tribune.

In an article published this week by the Texas Tribune and reposted here on Teach The Vote, ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter explained that for quite some time the education community has been expected to lay down and take whatever the legislature gives them. But that tide may be starting to change. Educators have been becoming increasingly vocal and active in recent elections. A popular target of educators’ dissatisfaction with the status quo has been Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R), and the Texas Tribune‘s article highlights the role educators have played in the bid by Democratic challenger Mike Collier to unseat him.

Another statewide race where public education has emerged as an issue, somewhat surprisingly, is the election for Texas Attorney General. There, Justin Nelson (D) is challenging the current AG Ken Paxton (R) and calling out the incumbent for eyebrow-raising stances he has taken on questions of political involvement by educators. Earlier this year when educators started activating behind another challenger vying to unseat Lt. Gov. Patrick in the Republican primary election, Paxton issued a non-binding legal opinion questioning the propriety of certain actions being taken by school officials and pro-public education groups like ATPE to increase voter turnout among educators and even students who are eligible to vote. Paxton has used the AG’s office to continue to intimidate school district leaders out of promoting voting, and Nelson has responded by appealing directly to educators in the late stages of his campaign.

Read more about how educator involvement in this election has become a central focus in the AG’s race and how the education community is responding to the attempts to tamp down educators’ enthusiasm in this post by ATPE’s Exter. For public school employees who still have questions about what is and is not permissible political speech under state law, the Texas Educators Vote (TEV) coalition of which ATPE is a member also created this guide on Election Do’s and Dont’s for educators.


If you want to beat the crowds on Election Day, you’ll want to turn out at the polls during the “12 Days of Voting” happening now. But ATPE can point to numerous other reasons for educators to get out and vote regardless of the crowds or lines.

As has been stated many times before, the results of this election happening now are crucial to every Texan but to educators especially. During this early voting period, we’ve begun highlighting some of the reasons why educators should take this election to heart. It doesn’t take much to see that with state leaders campaigning on boasts about non-existent pay raises for teachers, with continuous increases in the cost of healthcare, and with local taxpayers bearing more and more of the burden for school funding, it doesn’t take much to see that it’s time for a change. Check out the latest installments of our 12 Days of Voting series at the links below, and keep watching for new posts in our blog series throughout the early voting period:


A brand new poll released by the University of Texas and the Texas Tribune today shows that high numbers of Texas voters are enthusiastic about the general election happening now. As reported by the Texas Tribune today, 76 percent of the voters polled said they were “absolutely certain” they would be voting in the midterms. Both Republican and Democratic voters displayed such enthusiasm according to the new polls results. In most recent midterm elections, the actual percentage of registered voters who turned out at the polls in Texas has been only about 38 percent.

The poll also showed statewide officeholders holding considerable leads over their challengers among likely voters. Here are more excerpts from the Texas Tribune‘s reporting:

 

 

 

Election do’s and don’ts and perspectives of the Texas AG candidates

If you’re reading this blog post, you no doubt know that today is the first day of early voting for the midterm elections; and that in just over two weeks the tone will be set for how the next legislature will address public education issues in the upcoming session.

With such an important election upon us, many Texas educators have asked, as public servants/employees, what can you do and what can’t you do with regard to election-related communication and other activities. To answer that question we created this handy document in coordination with our coalition partners at Texas Educators Vote.

Some of you may also be aware that in the lead-up to this election, Attorney General Ken Paxton put out a somewhat unusual document on how he would like to see Texas educators engage (or NOT engage) during this election. While the language in the document may not be clear, the AG’s intent certainly seems to be minimizing the pro-public education voter turnout. Please note that AG opinions, which this document does not even purport to be, are non-binding and do not have the force of law.

Justin Nelson, Paxton’s opponent in the Attorney General’s race, has issued the following statement in response to the document put out by Paxton.

We urge all educators to exercise their right to vote in this and every election.

Early voting starts TODAY with Educator Voting Day!

It’s time!

Early voting starts today in the 2018 midterm elections, in which Texas voters will decide a number of important state and federal races. Not only is Monday the first day to vote early, it’s also Educator Voting Day!

The 2018 elections are critical for educators, because the outcome will have a direct impact on education policy in the next legislative session. Educators fought hard last session to protect their classrooms and their profession, and only prevailed with the help of elected representatives who shared their interest in supporting our public schools. Many of those allies are retiring, however, and unless Texans elect more pro-public education candidates to replace them, things could go very differently next session.

via GIPHY

Ok, I’m ready to vote! So what do I do?

First off, click on the CANDIDATES tab here at Teach the Vote and enter your address to find out who’s running in your area. There you can look at each candidate’s answers to our education policy survey and review incumbents’ voting records. Then check out VoteTexas.org to find your nearest polling place.

If you’re having trouble finding a polling location, the easiest place to look is your home county’s election website. For example, if you live in Dallas, then a Google search for “Dallas county elections” will turn up DallasCountyVotes.org. This is the official website of the Dallas County Elections Department. Most counties will have a similar website that lists polling locations and times.

Times during the first week of early voting can vary by county. Some, such as Dallas County and Travis County, open the polls from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Others, such as Harris County, limit the hours of early voting during the first week, then expand to 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. during the second week.

Also don’t forget to bring your ID. You can see a list of accepted forms of voter identification here. If you are legally registered to vote but don’t have an ID, you can still vote by signing an affidavit the election judges are required to provide for this purpose.

Early voting runs today, October 22, through Friday, November 2. Election Day is November 6. But there’s no need to wait! Head out and vote today, and make sure your friends, family, and colleagues vote as well. The future of our schools depends on it!

Last chance to register for Nov. 6 election

If you don’t vote, you can’t complain.

It’s just that simple.

November 6 is less than a month away, and a crucial deadline is upon us. Tuesday, Oct. 9, is the last day for those who have not yet registered to vote to do so in order to cast your ballot.

This is also an important date for those who are registered to vote, but may have recently relocated. For example, you may have registered to vote in Harris County, but recently moved to Travis County. In that case, you have until tomorrow to register in Travis County; otherwise, you’d have to drive back to Harris County to cast your ballot Nov. 6.

So how do I register?

The Texas Secretary of State’s VoteTexas.org website tells you just about everything you need to know. First off, it allows you check if you’re already registered. If you’re not, there are two basic ways you can register.

The first method is to simply find your county’s voter registrar and fill out an application in person. The voter registrar is usually tax assessor-collector or county clerk, and their office is easy to find by doing a web search. The application is generally a single page and should take you less than five minutes. Your other option is to fill out the state’s online application and mail it to your county’s voter registrar by tomorrow. You can read more information about how to find an application by clicking here.

How do I know if I’m eligible to register to vote?

You are eligible to register to vote if:

  • You are a United States citizen;
  • You are a resident of the county where you submit the application;
  • You are at least 17 years and 10 months old, and you are 18 years of age on Election Day.
  • You are not a convicted felon (you may be eligible to vote if you have completed your sentence, probation, and parole); and
  • You have not been declared by a court exercising probate jurisdiction to be either totally mentally incapacitated or partially mentally incapacitated without the right to vote.

The Texas Tribune also put together some voter registration resources here. Once you’ve registered to vote, make sure and go to TeachTheVote.org and click on the CANDIDATES tab to see who’s running in your area. You can view each’s candidate’s answers to our public education policy survey, as well as how incumbent legislators voted on important education issues last session.

If we’ve said it once, we’ve said it a hundred times: Legislative battles are won in November. If we fail to elect strong pro-public education candidates, we can’t expect to prevail when important education questions are debated in the Texas Legislature. This election is CRITICAL to making sure we move the ball forward, not backward.

Even if you’re already registered, you can do your part by informing friends and family that Tuesday is the last chance to register if they haven’t already – and make sure they follow through! Early voting begins Oct. 22 and runs through Nov. 2, and Election Day is Nov. 6.

Secretary of State reminds Texans to register to vote by Oct. 9

The following is a press release issued on Sept. 7, 2018, by the Texas Secretary of State’s office, reminding Texans about the Oct. 9 deadline to register to vote in the November 2018 general election.


Secretary Pablos Reminds Texans To Register To Vote By October 9th, Plan Their Trip To The Polls

“Prepare yourself, inform yourself, and empower yourself”

AUSTIN – Texas Secretary of State Rolando Pablos today reminded all eligible Texans to register to vote by October 9th and to make all necessary preparations to be able to cast a ballot in the upcoming November 6 General Election.

Secretary Pablos encouraged all eligible Texas voters to ensure that they:

(1) are registered to vote in their county of residence
(2) are aware of what they need to bring to the polls in order to cast a ballot.

Additionally, Secretary Pablos urged voters to contact their respective county elections offices to become familiar with their ballot, locate their appropriate polling location, and plan their trip to the polls.

With the October 9th voter registration deadline just over a month away, Secretary Pablos issued one last call-to-action by urging Texans to register and take the necessary steps to be prepared to vote.

“Don’t wait until the last minute, make sure you are registered well in advance of the October 9th voter registration deadline so that you cast a ballot in the November General Election,” Secretary Pablos said. “The Texas Secretary of State’s office wants to ensure that all eligible Texans can cast their ballots with confidence this November, and the first step in doing so is to make sure you are registered and ready to make your trip to the polls.”

Eligible Texans who are not already registered to vote may complete and print a voter registration application here, or request an application from their county elections administrator. Once completed,  eligible Texas voters may submit the application to the county voter registrar in their county of residence. Completed voter registration applications must be postmarked by October 9th, 2018 in order to be accepted. Texans may check to see if they are already registered to vote through the Texas Secretary of State’s web site or by visiting www.votetexas.gov.

“Prepare yourself, inform yourself, and empower yourself,” Secretary Pablos said. “As a Texas voter, you can set an example for your fellow Texans by showing your commitment to civic engagement. We will continue working with election officials across the Lone Star State to make sure all eligible Texans have the information and resources they need to register to vote and make their voices heard.”

To avoid longer waiting times on Election Day, the Texas Secretary of State encourages eligible registered voters to vote during the early voting period from Monday, October 22nd to Friday, November 2nd, 2018. During the early voting period, Texas voters can cast a ballot at any location in their county of registration.

Additionally, Secretary Pablos has proclaimed the first Friday of the early voting period (October 26th) to be Student Voting Day in the State of Texas, when all eligible Texas students are encouraged to cast their ballot in their county’s nearest polling location during times that do not conflict with their scholastic obligations.

Secretary Pablos also reminds Texas voters who possess one of the seven approved forms of photo ID that they must present that ID at the polls. Voters who do not possess and cannot reasonably obtain one of the seven forms of approved photo ID may execute a Reasonable Impediment Declaration form (PDF), available to them at each polling location, and provide a supporting form of identification. Additionally, certain voters may qualify for certain exemptions to presenting an acceptable form of photo identification or following the Reasonable Impediment Declaration (PDF)procedure.

The seven forms of approved photo ID are:

With the exception of the U.S. Citizenship Certificate, which does not expire, the acceptable photo ID must be current or, for voters aged 18-69, have expired no more than four years before being presented for voter qualification at the polling place. A voter 70 years of age or older may use a form of acceptable photo ID listed above that has expired for any length of time if the identification is otherwise valid.

If a voter does not possess one of the forms of acceptable photo identification listed above, and the voter cannot reasonably obtain such identification, the voter may fill out a Reasonable Impediment Declaration form (PDF), which will be available at each polling location, and present a copy or original of one of the following supporting forms of identification:

  • a government document that shows the voter’s name and an address, including the voter’s voter registration certificate;
  • a current utility bill;
  • a bank statement;
  • a government check;
  • a paycheck;
  • a certified domestic (from a U.S. state or territory) birth certificate; or
  • a document confirming birth admissible in a court of law which establishes the voter’s identity (which may include a foreign birth document)

The address on an acceptable form of photo identification or a supporting form of identification, if applicable, does not have to match the voter’s address on the list of registered voters.

If a voter meets these requirements and is otherwise eligible to vote, the voter will be able to cast a regular ballot in the election.

Voters with a disability may apply with the county voter registrar for a permanent exemption to presenting an acceptable form of photo identification or following the Reasonable Impediment Declaration procedure at the polls. Voters with a religious objection to being photographed or voters who do not present an acceptable form of photo identification or follow the Reasonable Impediment Declaration procedure at the polls because of certain natural disasters may apply for a temporary exemption to presenting an acceptable form of photo identification or following the Reasonable Impediment Declaration procedure. For more details, voters may contact their county voter registrar.

Voters with questions about how to cast a ballot in upcoming elections can call 1-800-252-VOTE

For Texas voters affected by Hurricane Harvey, click here for additional information and resources.

For more information on voting in Texas, visit www.votetexas.gov