Tag Archives: Texas Counts

Help spread the word about the 2020 Census

The 2020 Census is well underway, but at a smidge over 56%, Texas still has a long way to go in its response rate. Using the resources compiled by Texas Counts, here’s what educators and community stakeholders should consider as they help to get out the count in their communities.

Messaging: Find sample messaging here and remember to keep it simple and emphasize that completing the census is safe, easy, and important. Unfortunately, the potential inclusion of a citizenship question on the census has garnered fear among many who live in Texas. Some are also afraid that the information on the number of people who live in their household will be shared with their landlords or that their location will be shared with police or law enforcement. It important for those living in Texas to know that it is illegal for the U.S. Census Bureau to release information from the census and that the information shared, especially regarding children, will help to provide an adequate amount of resources for public schooling, meals, child care, and other essential public resources. Find a repository of videos, postcards, flyers, and posters from Texas Counts here.

Source: usatoday.com

Responding to the census is easier than ever with the new online response system, and you don’t have to have received an invitation to submit your response. As we previously reported, the U.S. Census Bureau has a great webpage explaining ways to respond to the census and updates on situations caused by the coronavirus, such as college students who are now at home. (Please count college students in the town in which they attend college!) Those who have not self-responded to the census can also use phone or mail methods to respond and must do so by October 31, 2020.

Recognizing Hard-to-Count Communities: It is estimated that 25% of Texans and 30% of Texas children live in areas that are considered hard-to-count due to difficulties in contacting, locating, surveying, and/or engaging. In some cases, factors like language barriers, lack of stable housing, or distrust of the government can contribute to the presence of hard-to-count communities. School systems are particularly suited to easing these factors because educators and school leaders are trusted community members, who can reach families through regular communications and contact (such as meal pickups), and are readily able to translate census outreach materials in the same ways they translate other school communications.

The image below gives you some idea of the vast area of Texas that is hard-to-count by showing the portions of Texas (in yellow) that are just beginning to receive hand-delivered packets from census workers. These areas do not have stable access to the internet or are in areas that require in-person delivery of census materials. Since these areas are perhaps just hearing about the census for the first time, so be sure to reach out to families and reinforce the safety and ease of completing the census. Census workers will undertake the huge task of non-response follow up (NRFU) starting August 11 through October 31, at which point they will go to all households that have not responded yet to the census. Since school will be starting again around this time, communications about the census to families are vital and should be disbursed regularly.

Know the Facts: As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, Texas received $43 billion in total census-statistic derived funding in 2018. This included over $1.3 billion dollars in Title I funding, $1.4 billion in National School Lunch Program funds, $1.1 billion for the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP), and billions more for foster care, early childhood education, child care, and other nutritional programs. A 1% under count could cost the state $300 million, which would heavily impact families, children, and the elderly. Knowing what is at stake will help messaging to those who rely on these services.

The tool below, developed by the City University of New York, is a great way to explore census data and see specifically which parts of your community need extra outreach.

See the full map at www.censushardtocountmaps2020.us

Happy census-ing and thank you to all educators and community stakeholders who are engaging in get-out-the-count efforts. Our public schools depend on it!

2020 Census: FAQs and coronavirus

Have you completed your 2020 Census questionnaire yet?

As of today, overĀ 11 million people living in the United States completed their census questionnaire. An accurate census count is crucial to funding in Texas that supports infrastructure, public schools, healthcare, and other services. In this post, ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier shares answers to commonly asked questions about the census, including the impact of COVID-19 on this census collection.

I haven’t received my invitation in the mail yet. When will I get it?

Invitations are being sent out to 140 million U.S. households from March 12-20. About 5% of the country will be visited in-person by a census enumerator because mail is not delivered to physical addresses in those areas.

Can I take the census if I haven’t received my invitation?

Yes, you can! If you are home due to concerns with COVID-19 and have access to the internet, now is a great time to fill out your census questionnaire, and you don’t have to wait on the mail (or touch the mail).

How do I complete the census? Is it available in non-English languages?

The online portal at my2020census.gov is a secure website that will walk you through the census, even if you haven’t received your invitation in the mail yet. The online questionnaire is translatable into 13 different languages, and the Census Bureau also has guides in 59 non-English languages, including American Sign Language, Braille, and large print. Individuals also have the opportunity to fill out the paper-based census questionnaire, which in areas with limited internet will be mailed with the initial invitation. The Census Bureau will send out reminders during the summer to non-responders that will include a paid-postage envelope and a paper questionnaire. Individuals can also respond by phone.

How do I fill out the race, ethnicity, and origin questions on the census?

An individual’s answers to the race, ethnicity, and origin questions are based on how they self-identify. In the series of race/ethnicity/origin questions, the census will first ask about Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin and notes that these are not considered racial categories. Individuals who identify as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish will be required to also choose a racial category (White, Black or African American, etc.) and write-in an origin. This can be confusing for those who already stated their origin in the Hispanic/Latino/Spanish question. A good rule of thumb is to simply answer as you identify and to not worry about your answers being right or wrong.

Is there a citizenship question?

No, there is not a citizenship question on the census.

Is taking the census safe? Can the information I provide be used against me?

The Census Bureau is prohibited by law from releasing identifying information to any entity, including law enforcement. The online website is secure, but beware of scams. Make sure you are using the website that has the “.gov” address before starting the questionnaire.

How will COVID-19 impact the census collection?

The Census Bureau is actively monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic and modifying its protocols as necessary. Currently, they are working on changes to cover some of the harder-to-count populations, since these often require in-person visits. Additionally, in-person visits to non-responders have been pushed later into April. According to news released today, field operations for the census have been suspended until April 1. As the situation develops, the Bureau will continue to make changes as necessary to protect the health of census workers and of the general public. The Bureau is urging everyone to take the census online, by mail, or by phone as early as possible.

For more information and a full list of FAQs about the census, please visit 2020census.gov. Also, don’t forget to check out texascounts.org for specific information regarding the census in Texas, as well as tool kits and other helpful resources.

Please also visit ATPE’s coronavirus FAQ and resource page for more information about COVID-19 and its impact on educators and education.

Texas public schools are counting on the 2020 Census

Check your mailbox today. Did you get a 2020 Census invitation?

By April 1, 2020, all households will receive an invitation to complete the 2020 U.S. Census, which determines many important factors of daily life, including funding for children, representation in Congress, and federal assistance for public necessities such as roads and emergency services. Invitations are being delivered between March 12-20. From March 30-April 1, the Census Bureau will count individuals experiencing homelessness, and in April, census workers will visit universities, nursing homes, and others who live in large groups. See a full timeline here.

The census is foundational to our democratic way of life in the United States. In fact, a decennial (every ten years) population count is required by the U.S. Constitution to ensure fair representation of everyone living in the United States. The number of representatives assigned to each state in the U.S. House of Representatives is based off census counts. Big and rapidly growing states like Texas rely on the census to make sure our voices are heard (proudly and loudly) in Washington, D.C. – we are projected to add two or three U.S. representatives to the Texas delegation after this census because of population growth. State and local officials also use the census results, which break down population by tracts of land, to draw boundaries for congressional districts, state legislative districts, State Board of Education districts, and school districts.

Example of 2020 Census questions. Source: 2020census.gov

The census counts every person living in the U.S. once, and your response to the questionnaire is required by law. The 2020 census includes 12 questions that will collect very basic data about households as of April 1, 2020, including size and type of household (house, apartment, mobile home), telephone number, and the race, ethnicity, age, and sex of each person living in the household. Find a sample of the 2020 census here. There is NO citizenship question. By law, the U.S. Census Bureau is not allowed to release personal information, even to law enforcement.

In 2018, Texas received over $1.3 billion dollars in Title I funding, which is based on census counts. Out of the $43 billion in total census-derived funding Texas received in 2018, our students also benefited from $1.4 billion in National School Lunch Program funds and billions more for health insurance, special education, foster care, early childhood education, child care, and other nutritional programs. All of these essential programs are at stake – even just a 1% undercount could cost the state $300 million.

Census-statistic derived federal aid to Texas, 2018. Source: CPPP

For the first time ever, the census can be completed online. Alternative methods such as by phone and mail are also still available. The census website features easy-to-understand resources about completing the census, including considerations for special circumstances facing families today, such as homelessness.

Hard-to-count areas represented with darker colors. Source: City University of New York

It is important to get an accurate count because public schools are legally required to educate ALL students and rely on federal funding tied to population numbers. The census counts everyone living in the U.S., including citizens, non-citizen legal residents and long-term visitors, and undocumented immigrants. Unfortunately, an estimated 25% of Texans and 30% of Texas children live in areas that are considered hard-to-count. These individuals are often hard to contact, locate, survey, and/or engage because of a variety of factors such as language barriers, lack of stable housing, or distrust of the government.

Texas Counts is a community hub that provides several resources for educators, schools, and districts related to get-out-the-count efforts. Since public schools educate all children, they are poised to reach families in unique ways to help promote completion of the census, dispel myths, and ease minds. Educators can also check out the resources on the U.S. Census website, which include lessons and other ways to make the census relevant to students at this crucial time.