Tag Archives: Sunset Advisory Commission

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Dec. 22, 2017

Happy holidays! Here’s your week in review from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Earlier today, President Donald Trump signed into law a major tax overhaul bill approved by Congress this week. The president also signed off on a short-term funding bill to keep the federal governmental operational for a few more weeks until longer-term legislation can be passed. The final $1.5 trillion tax bill omits some provisions that were worrisome for educators employed in public schools, which ATPE urged our congressional delegation to remove from earlier versions of the legislation. For more on the tax law that was approved, check out this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann.


Texas Speaker of the House Joe Straus (R-San Antonio) has announced his appointments to two key state commissions. First, the speaker revealed his picks to serve on the new Texas Commission on Public School Finance, authorized by the legislature earlier this year. The House appointments include Reps. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio), and Ken King (R-Canadian). Fittingly, all three of the representatives chosen by the speaker also hold leadership roles on the House Public Education Committee: Huberty as committee chair, Bernal as committee vice-chair, and King as chair of the Subcommittee on Educator Quality. Also appointed to serve on the commission is Nicole Conley Johnson, who is currently employed as Chief Financial Officer for Austin ISD. Additional members of the school finance commission were previously announced by Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick.

Yesterday, Straus also announced that Reps. Chris Paddie (R-Marshall), Stan Lambert (R-Abilene), and Poncho Nevarez (D-Eagle Pass) would serve on the Sunset Advisory Commission, along with public member and retired accountant Ron Steinhart of Dallas. The commission is charged with overseeing and making recommendations to the legislature on periodic reviews of various state agencies.


Twenty Texas school districts will have an opportunity to take part in a pilot program using locally designed accountability measures. Commissioner of Education Mike Morath named the districts selected earlier this week from a pool of 50 applicants. The pilot program falls under Rep. Dan Huberty’s House Bill 22 passed earlier this year. For more on the local accountability pilot study, view information on the Texas Education Agency’s website here.



 

Sunset Commission adopts controversial recommendation to abolish SBEC

As it prepares for the upcoming legislative session, the Sunset Advisory Commission—a state commission charged with reviewing state agencies and boards in order to recommend ways to eliminate waste, duplication, and inefficiency—met yesterday to finalize and approve its recommendations to the legislature. Among the state entities being reviewed were the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). The Sunset Commission voted to adopt all TEA- and SBEC-related recommendations preciously drafted by the Commission’s staff with no changes or additions. These include a recommendation that the legislature abolish SBEC and transfer its powers and duties to the Commissioner of Education, which is a proposal that ATPE strongly opposes.

The Commission met in November to hear input from Commission staff, Texas Education Agency representatives, and members of the public. ATPE testified at that hearing and submitted written comments regarding several of the recommendations. Read the Commission’s December 2014 staff report, including responses to input on the recommendations received from ATPE and others.

Weigh in on Sunset

At yesterday’s meeting, the recommendation to abolish SBEC was voted on separately from most other sections in the sunset report. One member of the Commission spoke in opposition to the recommendation and voiced concerns expressed by many educators, including the potential for the profession to be governed by someone with little or no prior education experience. (There is currently no requirement in law that the Commissioner of Education have a background in education). Ultimately, only two members of the Commission voted against abolishing SBEC, and the recommendation was finally adopted by the Commission. It goes next to the 84th Legislature for consideration.

ATPE believes educators should have the right to govern their own profession. Restructuring SBEC to reflect an independent board of Texas educators elected by their peers would better serve the profession. SBEC currently consists entirely of members appointed by the governor and is an entity closely affiliated with TEA. Many professions are afforded the right to govern their own profession and have a governing board comparable to what ATPE supports for educators. Texas lawyers, for example, are governed by the Texas State Bar, an independent board of Texas attorney elected by the members of their own profession.

Other recommendations adopted by the Sunset Commission yesterday include removing the power of the State Board of Education (SBOE) to review and reject SBEC rules and giving TEA administrative subpoena power when investigating certified educators for possible disciplinary sanctions. ATPE opposed the recommendation to do away with SBOE’s veto power, because allowing the SBOE an opportunity to review SBEC rules at a public hearing gives stakeholders an additional opportunity to be heard and participate in the rule-making process. In the event that the legislature goes forward with abolishing SBEC and giving its authority to the Commissioner of Education, the SBOE veto will become even more important. ATPE has supported giving TEA limited subpoena power only as long as information gathered through investigations is properly and fairly shared with the educators facing possible sanctions. Among recommendations by the Sunset Commission that ATPE supports are providing for enhanced transparency and stakeholder participation throughout TEA and improving regulations that pertain to educator preparation programs.

It is important to note that these recommendations are not yet law. The legislature will convene in January to begin considering these proposals in the form of a sunset bill. ATPE will work with legislators to advocate for the adoption of positive recommendations in the report and against the harmful ones. The TEA and SBEC sunset recommendations will not be new to most legislators when the 2015 session convenes because they saw many of the same recommendations last session. State agencies and boards typically face sunset review once every 12 years, and the Sunset Commission reviewed both TEA and SBEC in 2012 and made similar recommendations to the 83rd Legislature. ATPE helped defeat sunset bills in the 2013 session, primarily because they called for abolishing SBEC. The defeat of those bills necessitated another limited-scope sunset review of TEA and SBEC this year, which will culminate in the filing of new sunset bills for the 2015 legislative session.

Stay tuned to the Teach the Vote blog for updates on the sunset bills as they move through the legislative process.

Sunset Commission hears recommendations from public and state on TEA, SBEC

The Sunset Advisory Commission—a commission tasked with assessing Texas state boards and agencies in order to recommend ways to eliminate existing waste, duplication, and inefficiency—met Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 12 and 13, to hear input from Sunset Commission staff, Texas Education Agency representatives, and members of the public. The Sunset Commission staff released its report making recommendations for the Texas Education Agency (TEA), which includes the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC), in October.

TEA is up for reconsideration by the Sunset Commission because ATPE helped to defeat sunset bills during the 2013 legislative session that, in part, called for transferring the powers and duties of SBEC to the Commissioner of Education. Of the 56 recommendations made by the Commission ahead of the 2013 legislative session, 41 recommendations remain in the report for consideration during the 2015 legislative session. Several of the previous recommendations were adopted through the passage of other bills during the 2013 legislative session or were administratively adopted by TEA.

The Sunset Commission sought input from stakeholders and the public as it prepared its report in anticipation of the 2015 legislative session. ATPE submitted input to the Commission at that time and additional input when given the opportunity to respond to the recommendations in the recently released Sunset staff report. During public testimony at the hearing this week, ATPE again testified on contents of the report. Included in all of our testimony is opposition to transferring the powers and duties of SBEC to the Commissioner of Education, support for enhanced transparency and stakeholder participation throughout TEA, a recommendation to require TEA to share with certified educator(s) under investigation any information collected through administrative subpoena power, opposition to abolishing the State Board of Education’s review of educator preparation and certification rule making, and support for improved regulations regarding educator preparation programs.