Tag Archives: shannon holmes

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Dec. 21, 2018

Happy holidays! Here’s a look at ATPE’s final week in review for 2018:


On Wednesday, the Texas Commission on Public School Finance concluded its work by finalizing its recommendations for the 86th Legislature. As ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins reported on our blog, the commission unanimously approved 30 recommendations, including the following:

  • Adopting Governor Greg Abbott’s plan to cap local school district taxes in order to provide property tax relief
  • Creating incentives for school districts to develop new evaluation systems that would be tied to differentiated pay for teachers based on student outcomes and experience
  • Offering financial help for school districts to offer dual language programs
  • Focusing early education resources to improve students’ reading levels by third grade
  • Aiming to have 60 percent of graduating high school seniors prepared to enter the workforce, college, or the military without remedial education

Final school finance commission meeting Dec. 19, 2018.

Upon the final vote, ATPE immediately published a press release thanking the commissioners for their hard work and sharing additional input to be considered by lawmakers as they take up the issues reflected in the report. ATPE is urging legislators to address the imbalance between state and local funding and warning against making any hasty changes to the state’s teacher evaluation laws.

In the statement which was picked up by the Texas Tribune in its reporting, ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes expressed hope that lawmakers will recognize the need for more adequate funding of public schools.

“There can be no real school finance reform that fails to address adequacy,” said Shannon Holmes, executive director of the Association of Texas Public Educators, in a statement after Wednesday’s vote. “ATPE is disheartened that some members on the commission were unwilling to acknowledge the reality of the limitation of our state’s current funding levels out of fears of sparking litigation.”

Improving the school finance system is ATPE’s top priority for the legislative session that begins in January, along with related priorities for increasing teacher pay, shoring up the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) pension plan, and making healthcare more affordable for active and retired educators. ATPE’s lobby team looks forward to working with lawmakers on these issues and will provide updates here on the Teach the Vote blog as bills move through the legislative process.

 


Kate Kuhlmann

Today is the last day at work for ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann, who is leaving our team to take on a new career opportunity starting in January. We thank Kate for her years of service to our governmental relations department and wish her the best of luck in her new endeavor.

 


 

Our Teach the Vote bloggers will be taking a break until Jan. 7 as the ATPE state office will be closed during that time period. ATPE wishes you and your family a joyous and safe holiday season.

 


From The Texas Tribune: Texas school finance panel approves final report to lawmakers

By Aliyya Swaby, The Texas Tribune
Dec. 19, 2018

Texas Commission on Public School Finance member Todd Williams of Dallas, left, speaks with Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath and state Sen. Royce West, D-Dallas, on Jan. 23, 2018. | Photo by Bob Daemmrich for the Texas Tribune

Texas school finance panel approves final report to lawmakers” was first published by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

After hours of discussion Wednesday, a state panel studying school finance stripped its final report of language that blamed the state for inadequate education spending — and that added urgency to a need for more money to improve student performance.

The original version of the report, unveiled last Tuesday, included stronger language that held the state accountable for the lack of education funding and urged lawmakers to immediately inject more than a billion dollars of new funding into public schools. Scott Brister, the panel’s chairman and a former Texas Supreme Court justice, led the charge to make those changes, which he said would be more palatable to lawmakers and keep Texas from being sued in the future.

“I do have a problem several places where it says our school system has failed. I do think that’s asking for trouble,” he said.

Some lawmakers and educators on the panel pushed back before agreeing to compromise.

“I think we have failed our schools and we haven’t funded them, in my view, adequately or equitably,” responded state Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston, who chairs the House Public Education Committee.

Despite the conflict, the 13-member commission unanimously approved more than 30 recommendations on Wednesday aimed at boosting public education funding, improving student performance, cleaning up a messy funding distribution system — and providing property tax relief for Texans.

A final report will be sent to lawmakers, who are convening next month amid calls from state leadership to overhaul a long-embattled school finance system. Gov. Greg Abbott supported the panel’s vote in a statement Wednesday afternoon: “Today’s school finance commission report made clear that the state must reform the broken Robin Hood system and allocate more state funding to education. This session, we will do just that.”

The vote was the culmination of nearly a year of meetings and hours of testimony from school superintendents, education advocates and policy experts.

Panel members have bickered for months about basic foundational concepts, including whether the state had been underfunding public schools and whether they actually need more money in order to improve. The report takes a middle ground approach, promising more money to school districts that meet certain criteria or agree to offer specific programs such as dual language or merit pay for teachers.

Many of the debates among panel members Wednesday reflected their political divisions, with Brister — a conservative and Abbott appointee — arguing against citing a specific amount lawmakers should infuse into the public school funding system and school officials saying the panel should take an explicit stand based on its research.

An earlier version of the report said lawmakers should take the “important first step” of approving more than $1.73 billion in “new funding” for “the vast majority (if not all)” of the proposed programs.

The recommendation the commission approved Wednesday dropped that dollar figure.

Brister said he was uncomfortable sending a report to lawmakers that pressured them into making specific financial decisions.

“I am willing to say we will have to add new money to do these things. I am not willing to say, ‘And the first step is, every dime has to come from new money,” he said.

Nicole Conley-Johnson, chief financial officer of the Austin Independent School District, unsuccessfully argued to keep the paragraph in its original form.

“The spirit by which we were convened is to establish the changes and make recommendations,” she said. “I feel like we need to have the foresight to put in the estimated cost.”

Education advocacy groups criticized Brister’s decision. “There can be no real school finance reform that fails to address adequacy,” said Shannon Holmes, executive director of the Association of Texas Public Educators, in a statement after Wednesday’s vote. “ATPE is disheartened that some members on the commission were unwilling to acknowledge the reality of the limitation of our state’s current funding levels out of fears of sparking litigation.”

The report still includes cost estimates for recommended programs and changes to how funding is divvied up among schools. But it no longer implores state lawmakers to pay for them.

Among the recommendations the commission plans to send to lawmakers are:

  • $100 million a year to school districts that want to develop their own teacher evaluation metrics and tie pay to performance. The total amount available should increase $100 million each year until it reaches $1 billion.
  • Up to $150 million to incentivize school districts to offer dual language programs, which instruct students in both English and Spanish, and to improve their dyslexia programs.
  • $800 million to incentivize school districts to improve students’ reading level in early grades and to succeed in college or a career after graduating high school.
  • $1.1 billion to improve education for low-income students, with school districts that have a higher share of needy students getting more money.
  • Create a new goal of having 60 percent of third-grade students reading on or above grade level and 60 percent of high school seniors graduating with a technical certificate, military inscription, or college enrollment without the need for remedial classes.
  • Cap local school district tax rates in order to offer property tax relief and a small amount of funding for schools —a proposal from Abbott.
  • No extra funding for special education programs until the state has completed overhauling those programs in line with a federal mandate.

This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2018/12/19/texas-school-finance-panel-approves-final-report/.

 

Texas Tribune mission statement

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Dec. 7, 2018

Here’s the latest update on education news and legislative developments from your ATPE Governmental Relations team:


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today in Austin. On the agenda was the approval of new teacher certification standards, performance standards for preparation program accreditation status, and principal and teacher surveys. The board gave final approval (subject to SBOE review) to the pedagogy and professional responsibilities (PPR) standards for the new Trade and Industrial Workforce Training Certificate and to updated performance standards under the accountability system for educator preparation programs (EPPs). The board also approved final versions of the previously piloted principal and teacher surveys to be used for EPP accountability. Minor changes were made to the surveys; a number of duplicative questions were removed to avoid data overlap.

The bulk of the meeting was spent on a discussion item regarding a proposal from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to redesign the teacher certification process in Texas. The item was not up for action today, but still drew a large number of testifiers. The addition of a performance-based, portfolio-style certification assessment drew the most attention. Testifiers expressed concerns with cost, problems with the edTPA design, and fears of shrinking the teacher candidate pool, among others. Supporters raised the need for higher rigor in order to ensure teacher candidates receive adequate preparation, and they stressed that more than just a multiple choice certification exam should be required to demonstrate knowledge. The redesign item was only a discussion today, so no action was taken. For more on the discussion today, read this Twitter thread from ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann.

 


With the regular session of the 86th Legislature only a month away now, school finance continues to dominate discussions about which education-related issues lawmakers will tackle earnestly in 2019. ATPE’s lobbyists have been reporting on the deliberations this year of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance, which was tasked with making recommendations for legislative changes to the state’s beleaguered school funding system. A final report is expected from the commission this month.

Many of those recent school finance discussions involving legislators and policymakers have centered around the desire to provide property tax relief for homeowners and cap the amount of local taxes that can be levied by school districts and other municipalities. Decreasing the taxing burden at the local school district level is a popular idea, along with requiring the state to assume responsibility for funding a larger portion of the state’s education budget. But as Ross Ramsey writes in his analysis this week for the Texas Tribune that we’ve republished here on Teach the Vote, it remains unclear where additional revenue might be generated to offset the reduction in local property taxes. ATPE’s lobby team will continue to participate in and report on the discussions about school finance as we head into the upcoming legislative session.

Rep. Gary VanDeaver, ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes, and Rep. Travis Clardy at the TAMS conference, Dec. 6, 2018

On the heels of a competitive 2018 election cycle, many elected officials have also been talking about raising teacher pay. This week, two state representatives debated the issue of teacher compensation during a conference hosted by the Texas Association of Midsize Schools. ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes was invited to moderate the panel discussion, and ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins provided this blog post about the event.

 


Register to attend the 2019 ATPE at the Capitol event taking place in Austin on Feb. 24–-25, 2019! ATPE members, this is your opportunity to be a part of the process when the Texas Legislature convenes next month.

On Sunday, Feb. 24, you’ll learn about the top education issues that will be on the front burner next session and receive training on how to become an effective advocate for your profession. On Monday, Feb. 25, you’ll head to the Texas Capitol along with hundreds of ATPE members to directly speak to legislators and their staff.

To learn more about this exciting event, please log in to atpe.org/advocacy-central to register (there is no registration fee). The deadline to register online for this event and book hotel rooms is Jan. 24, 2019. Take advantage and register early as hotel rooms are booking up fast. Please feel free to contact government@atpe.org. with any questions.

 


Houstonians will be heading to the polls once more on Dec. 11 to determine who will represent them in the state senate during the upcoming legislative session. After Sen. Sylvia Garcia vacated her seat to run for Congressional District TX – 29, a seat she won last month, a Senate District 6 special election was called by Gov. Greg Abbott in order to fill her seat. The two women leading the race to replace Garcia are well known Houston Democrats Rep. Carol Alvarado of Texas House District 145 (HD 145), Rep. Ana Hernandez of Texas House District 143 (HD -143), Democrat Mia Mundy, and Republican Martha Fierro. If a single candidate fails to capture 50 percent of the vote on Tuesday, there could be a runoff in January after the legislative session has begun. Early voting in the race ends today. Harris County voters can find poll locations and sample ballots here.

Dec. 11 will also be election day for a number of local races across the state, so find out what’s on your local ballot here.


ATPE’s Shannon Holmes facilitates teacher pay discussion

ATPE Executive Director Dr. Shannon Holmes moderated a panel discussion on teacher compensation Thursday at a conference for the Texas Association of Midsize Schools (TAMS). The discussion included state Reps. Gary VanDeaver (R-New Boston), who is a member of the Texas House Public Education Committee, and Travis Clardy (R-Nacogdoches), who filed a high-profile teacher compensation bill in 2017 during the 85th Texas Legislature.

Both representatives agreed about the need to increase teacher compensation, which has become a major topic of discussion heading into the 86th Texas Legislature. Some of the most serious plans proposed thus far have featured differentiated pay, in which top-performing teachers are eligible for higher paychecks. Rep. VanDeaver noted that the major concern with these plans revolves around how top-performing teachers are identified. ATPE has consistently warned that student test scores should not be the primary metric for this purpose.

Rep. Gary VanDeaver, ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes, and Rep. Travis Clardy at the TAMS conference on Dec. 6, 2018

Rep. Clardy acknowledged that a critical part of any raise this session will be identifying state funding for that purpose. Legislation addressing teacher pay during the 2017 special session did not include state funding and instead asked districts to pay for raises out of their own pockets, which effectively tabled the discussion.

The conference featured other panels related to public education, including one featuring state Reps. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) and Ken King (R-Canadian), both members of the House Public Education Committee, as well as State Board of Education (SBOE) Member Keven Ellis (R-Lufkin). All three serve on the Texas Commission on Public School Finance, which was created in part by the failure of a House-sponsored school finance reform bill last session. Rep. Bernal vowed that if the commission fails to come up with a real plan to reform the finance system before the new session begins, the House will come up with its own plan and challenge the Senate to pass it.

Thursday’s event furthered underscored the extent to which the focus will be on public education in the upcoming legislative session. Many lawmakers who have seemed uninterested in addressing school finance in the past are now championing reform efforts. Rep. King and others suggested Thursday that the results of the most recent election sent a strong message that Texas voters want legislators who will advance the interests of public education.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 20, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Shannon Holmes

This week included some big news for our central office. ATPE announced Hardin-Jefferson ISD Superintendent Dr. Shannon Holmes will take over the reins as our new ATPE executive director starting in September. Dr. Holmes was recommended by a search committee composed of ATPE stakeholders and was approved by a vote of the ATPE Board of Directors.

Dr. Holmes has led HJISD, a 4A school district based in Sour Lake in Southeast Texas, since 2005. He brings 20 years of experience with Texas public schools, a long history of involvement with public education organizations, a strong background in business and finance, and proven engagement with issues facing public education in Texas. He currently serves as chair of the 2018 Legislative Council for the University Interscholastic League (UIL) and has experience testifying before committees of the Texas Legislature.

We’re excited to welcome Dr. Holmes to the ATPE family! Please join us in making him feel at home. You can read more about Dr. Holmes in the official ATPE press release.


The Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Security met again Wednesday of this week at the Texas Capitol. This marked the third meeting of the committee formed by Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick in the wake of the horrific shooting in Santa Fe, Texas. The Texas House of Representatives has held similar hearings through its Public Education and Public Health committees. The agenda for Wednesday’s meeting was laid out as follows:

Examine the root cause of mass murder in schools including, but not limited to, risk factors such as mental health, substance use disorders, anger management, social isolation, the impact of high intensity media coverage — the so-called “glorification” of school shooters — to determine the effect on copy cat shootings, and the desensitization to violence resulting from video games, music, film, and social media. Recommend strategies to early identify and intercept high-risk students, as well as strategies to promote healthy school culture, including character education and community support initiatives.

Lawmakers heard plenty of calls for additional resources, such as counselors and psychologists, to address these issues. However the Senate in particular has a history of being resistant to initiatives that involve increasing state spending on schools. You can read a recap of the hearing by ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann here.


A busy and successful ATPE Summit last week in Dallas didn’t slow down ATPE’s state officers, who were back to work Monday morning advocating for ways to keep campuses safe.

ATPE State President Carl Garner, State Vice President Byron Hildebrand, State Secretary Tonja Gray, and State Treasurer Jimmy Lee were invited by the governor’s staff to participate in stakeholder meetings covering a range of topics pertaining to school safety.

This included feedback relating to law enforcement in schools, the marshal program, and students removed from traditional classrooms for disciplinary reasons. ATPE leaders were able to share their personal experiences with Gov. Greg Abbott’s staff and make suggestions for ways to maximize campus safety. Read more about their meeting in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann.