Tag Archives: school safety

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 20, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Ellis and Bahorich

Dr. Keven Ellis (R) of Lufkin has been appointed as the new chair of the State Board of Education (SBOE). Dr. Ellis assumes the role after the previous chair, Donna Bahorich (R) of Houston, served the maximum of two terms over the last 4 years. Bahorich presided over last week’s SBOE meetings, which we covered here on our Teach the Vote blog, and she will remain a member of the board. Dr. Ellis has been an elected member of the board since 2016, and he recently represented the SBOE as vice chair of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance. Read more about Monday’s announcement of the SBOE change of leadership here on Teach the Vote.


ELECTION UPDATE: Tuesday, September 24, will mark the eighth annual National Voter Registration Day (NVRD), a non-partisan effort to increase civic participation. For more information on NVRD and other election news, including announcements about a key senator’s retirement and the race to succeed him, check out this week’s election update from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


This week’s edition of our “New School Year, New Laws” blog series on Teach the Vote covers the topic of special education. Following media reports and a federal investigation that found Texas had for years imposed an arbitrary, de facto cap on enrolling students into special education programs, this year’s legislative session was heavily focused on addressing special education, from increasing funding to enacting laws to raise awareness of students’  and parents’ rights. Read the latest blog post in our series by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier for a breakdown of new legislation that affects special education.


The TRS board met in Austin this week discussing topics ranging from healthcare affordability to retirees’ recently issued 13th check and potential office moves for the agency. Read more about the discussions in this new post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, who attended the TRS meetings this week.


A pair of hearings on the subject of school safety and preventing school violence took place this week in Texas and in Washington, DC, with more meetings scheduled in the near future.

First, in the nation’s capital this week, the U.S. House Committee on Education and Labor met Wednesday for a markup of H.R. 4301, the “School Shooting Safety and Preparedness Act” filed by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D – Hawaii). The measure calls for an annual report by the U.S. Department of Education on school violence data and would define in federal statute the terms “mass shooting” and “school shooting.” After a heated debate, the committee approved the bill by a party-line vote of 27-22, with some Republicans on the committee, including its ranking member, deriding it as a “publicity stunt.” For members of the Texas congressional delegation serving on the committee, Democrat Joaquin Castro voted for the measure, while Republicans Van Taylor and Ron Wright voted against it.

Here in Texas, the new House Select Committee on Mass Violence Prevention and Community Safety held its first meeting on Tuesday. During the organizational meeting, committee members heard invited testimony only from state law enforcement officials and mostly focused their conversation around the topic of threat reporting and investigations. A similar select committee established in the Texas Senate will hold its first meeting next week on Sept. 26.


Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 6, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


In the wake of the tragic shootings in El Paso and Odessa, Gov. Greg Abbott has issued executive orders addressing public safety. While most of the orders focus on improving agency-level responses like developing standardized intake questions and guidelines on when to submit Suspicious Activity Reports, executive orders number five and six deal directly with schools. The orders are as follows:

  • Order No. 5 The Department of Public Safety shall work with the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board on ways to better inform schools, students, staff, and families about the importance of Suspicious Activity Reports and how to initiate that process.
  • Order No. 6 The Department of Public Safety shall work with local law enforcement, mental-health professionals, school districts, and others to create multidisciplinary threat assessment teams for each of its regions, and when appropriate shall coordinate with federal partners.

Learn more about the executive orders in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


Earlier this week U.S. Rep. Bill Flores (R-TX 17) announced that he would not be seeking re-election in 2020. This season has seen the announcement of a number of departures from Capitol Hill as well as many campaign launches. The special elections to fill the seats vacated by Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond), Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston), and Rep. Eric Johnson (D-Dallas) have been set to coincide with voting on the constitutional amendments on Nov. 5th. The deadline to register to vote in the Nov. 5th election is Oct. 7. For more on the races in the upcoming election check out this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. 


Curriculum and instruction is the subject of this week’s installment of ATPE’s blog series, “New School Year, New Laws.” This blog post examines bills such as House Bill 4310 by Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston) which stipulates that sufficient time be given for students to learn the scope and sequence of TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills); and parts of House Bill 3 that provide funding for gifted and talented programs. For the full list of laws visit this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier. 


The latest edition of the Texas Education Agency’s weekly video series, “HB 3 in 30,” covers special education and dyslexia. You can find a link to this week’s video and all previous videos here.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) has announced a time frame for retirees to receive their 13th ThinkstockPhotos-465016790_moneycheck. According to the TRS.Texas.gov website, retirees will receive their 13th check on or around Sept. 15, 2019. A list of frequently asked questions about the check can be found here. More of Teach the Vote’s coverage of Senate Bill 12 (the bill responsible for the 13th check) can be found in this blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter..


 

Breaking news: Gov. Abbott issues executive orders in response to shootings

In response to the recent El Paso and Odessa shootings, Gov. Greg Abbott today issued eight executive orders aimed at addressing public safety regarding gun violence. The executive orders are focused on tightening the alignment between reporting suspicious behavior and the actions taken by law enforcement officials in response to potential threats. Executive orders numbers five and six are likely to have the most impact on schools.

  • Order No. 1 Within thirty days of this order, the Texas Department of Public Safety shall develop standardized intake questions that can be used by all Texas law-enforcement agencies to better identify whether a person calling the agency has information that should be reported to the Texas Suspicious Activity Reporting Network.
  • Order No. 2 Within thirty days of this order, the Department of Public Safety shall develop clear guidance, based on the appropriate legal standard, for when and how Texas law-enforcement agencies should submit Suspicious Activity Reports.
  • Order No. 3 Within sixty days of this order, the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement shall make training available to educate all law-enforcement officers regarding the standards that will be developed pursuant to Order No. 1 and Order No. 2.
  • Order No. 4 The Department of Public Safety shall create and conduct an initiative to raise public awareness and understanding of how Suspicious Activity Reports are used by law-enforcement agencies to identify potential mass shooters or terroristic threats, so that the general public and friends, family members, coworkers, neighbors, and classmates will be more likely to report information about potential gunmen.
  • Order No. 5 The Department of Public Safety shall work with the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board on ways to better inform schools, students, staff, and families about the importance of Suspicious Activity Reports and how to initiate that process.
  • Order No. 6 The Department of Public Safety shall work with local law enforcement, mental-health professionals, school districts, and others to create multidisciplinary threat assessment teams for each of its regions, and when appropriate shall coordinate with federal partners.
  • Order No. 7 The Department of Public Safety, as well as the Office of the Governor, shall use all available resources to increase staff at all fusion centers in Texas for the purpose of better collecting and responding to Suspicious Activity Reports, and better monitoring and analyzing social media and other online forums, for potential threats.
  • Order No. 8 Beginning January 1, 2020, all future grant awards from the Office of the Governor to counties shall require a commitment that the county will report at least 90 percent of convictions within seven business days to the Criminal Justice Information System at the Department of Public Safety.  By January 1, 2021, such reporting must take place within five business days.

Before the 86th legislative session, Gov. Abbott declared school safety as an emergency item, which led to the passage of several bills on the topic. See our blog post on school safety, part of ATPE’s “New School Year, New Laws” series here on Teach the Vote, for more information on changes coming to school districts this year. For more information on the funding and policy decisions made over the last two years to address school safety, view the governor’s recently released report entitled “Improving School Safety in Texas”.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 30, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


On Wednesday, Gov. Greg Abbott issued a new report lauding efforts aimed at “Improving School Safety in Texas.” The school safety update details recent legislative and administrative actions taken, including the approval of 17 new laws and $339 million in state funding. Additionally, the report highlights a 37% increase in the number of teachers and school resource officers (SROs) being trained in mental health first aid; improvements to communications between various state agencies that deal with school safety issues; and new authority for charter schools to hire security personnel. Read more about the new report in this blog post from ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.

Also this week, ATPE’s lobbyists posted the second installment of our “New School Year, New Laws” blog series here on Teach the Vote with a look at school safety legislation. Check out Monday’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier to learn more about bills that were passed during the 2019 legislative session to address safety issues such as student mental health, school marshals, and school preparedness for emergencies and traumas. Next week we’ll be posting an update on new laws pertaining to curriculum and instruction.


A product of the 85th Texas Legislature, Senate Bill 1882 that was passed in 2017 allows public schools that are at risk of being shut down to partner with charter schools for turnaround initiatives. In the recently released “A-F” accountability grades for school districts and campuses, seven of the 12 public school campuses that have partnered with charters or nonprofits received an “F” rating.

While it may be too soon to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the partnerships, and there are serious questions about the utility of the A-F system, the accountability ratings offer an early glimpse at how the partnership program is working. Our friend Aliyya Swaby at the Texas Tribune wrote about the findings in this article republished on our Teach the Vote blog this week.


We’ve reached that point in the year when campaign announcements are coming out practically every day. Find out which legislators have announced their re-election bids in our latest election update from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. This week Mark offers insights on the districts where contested races are shaping up and highlights new resources available from the Texas Educators Vote coalition. Read the newest election news roundup here.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) continues its “HB 3 in 30” video series with two new video presentations uploaded this week. The latest entries in the series highlight funding changes under this year’s major school finance and reform bill for charter schools and Gifted and Talented programs. View the HB 3 video resources here.


 

Breaking news: Governor releases Texas School Safety Update

Gov. Greg Abbott released his 23-page Texas School Safety Update today. As we have reported here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog, Gov. Abbott convened a series of roundtable discussions on the issues of school shootings and school safety following the tragic shooting that occurred last year at Santa Fe High School. The governor also designated school safety as an emergency item for the 86th Texas Legislature to work on during the 2019 legislative session. 

The Texas School Safety Update is aimed largely at highlighting in one document the funding and policy decisions that have been made over the last two years to address school safety. Entitled “Improving School Safety in Texas,” the report shared with the public today details both legislative and administrative actions that have been taken at least partly in response to the governor’s focus on school safety and his recommendations for dealing with the issue. View the full report here.

New School Year, New Laws: School Safety

In the aftermath of the shooting at Santa Fe High School in May 2018, Gov. Greg Abbott hosted a series of roundtable discussions to gather input from students, teachers, lawmakers, law enforcement and other stakeholders, including ATPE state officers, on how to prevent such a tragedy from reoccurring. Additionally, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick created the Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Security, which held a series of hearings to generate legislative recommendations. Both the roundtables and the hearings considered issues ranging from hardening school facilities to mental health to gun control. Similar discussions are taking place now in a new set of roundtable discussions convened by Gov. Abbott following another shooting in El Paso this month.

At the start of the 86th Legislative Session, Gov. Abbott gave school safety and mental health legislation special expedited status by declaring these issues as emergency items. Lawmakers then deliberated on these issues and passed several bills aimed at helping to prevent future tragedies involving violence in schools. In this week’s installment of “New School Year, New Laws,” we will fill you in on some changes you can expect in your school when it comes to safety.

The following bills go into effect in the 2019-20 school year:

Senate Bill (SB) 11 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood): Omnibus School Safety Bill

SB 11, which was effective with Gov. Abbott’s signature on June 6, 2019, made a big policy statement about how Texas “thinks” about school safety. The bill emphasizes student mental health and incorporates many strategies to address the psychological factors of school violence in addition to other practices, such as school hardening and emergency preparedness. Here are some ways the bill could impact you:

School safety allotment: Districts are set to receive $100 million over the next two years from a new “school safety allotment.” These funds are estimated at $9.72 per student in average daily attendance and can be used to secure facilities, purchase security technology, hire security and mental health personnel, and provide training (including programs to address adverse childhood experiences).

Training and professional development: Since 2005, districts have been required to create multi-hazard emergency operations plans to address preparedness (including employee training) and responses to a variety of emergency situations, such as weather events. SB 11 adds a requirement that these plans cover a variety of new preparedness provisions, including ensuring employee training for suicide prevention, psychological first aid, and grief-informed and trauma-informed care. District employees, including substitute teachers, must also be trained in responding to an emergency.

Campus changes: Employees must have classroom access to a telephone or other communication device that allows for immediate contact with emergency services. Additionally, each campus will be required to establish a threat assessment and safe and supportive school team. Team members must include those with expertise in classroom instruction, special education, counseling, and school administration, among others.

Read our session recap coverage of SB 11 in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins for more information.

House Bill (HB) 19 by Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo): Mental Health Resources

HB 19 utilizes local mental health authorities (LMHAs) to provide mental health resources to public schools. LMHAs are community mental health centers that contract with Texas Health and Human Services to provide services to specific geographic areas. (Find your LMHA here). Under HB 19, LMHAs will employ a non-physician mental health professional to collaborate with the Education Service Center (ESC) in their region and serve as a mental health and substance use resource for that ESC’s school districts. HB 19 is effective on Sept. 1, 2019. This means you might start to see the mental health professional providing training for school district personnel early this school year, if your district has decided to participate in the program. The mental health professional is required to provide monthly training on mental health first aid, the effects of grief and trauma, and substance abuse prevention and intervention. The legislature appropriated $4.6 million dollars to provide grants in order to implement this bill.

HB 1387 by Rep. Cole Hefner (R-Mount Pleasant): Removing the Cap on School Marshals

In 2013, the 83rd Texas Legislature created the school marshal program. School marshals are employees, such as teachers and principals, who are appointed by the governing body of public school districts, charter schools, two-year public junior colleges, and private schools. The individual must have a valid license to carry firearms, pass a psychological exam, and complete an 80-hour school marshal course. Due to the secretive nature of the program (marshals are anonymous), it is unclear exactly how many school marshals there are in Texas or how many districts are participating. Since the enactment of the law, the number of school marshals in a district has been limited to the greater of either one marshal per 200 students in average daily attendance per campus or one marshal per building of the campus where students are regularly being taught. Under HB 1387, this limit on the number of marshals is removed. This law goes into effect Sept. 1, 2019.

HB 2195 by Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Highland Park): Active Shooter Policy and Training

HB 2195 adds that district multi-hazard emergency plans should also include a policy for responding to an active shooter and that school district peace officers or resource officers must complete an active shooter response training. This law took effect immediately after it was signed by the governor on June 14, 2019.

The following bill will begin to impact educators in the 2020-21 school year:

HB 18 by Rep. Price (R-Amarillo): Public School Mental Health Training, Curriculum, and Continuing Education

HB 18 addresses school safety with a focus on professional development and curriculum regarding student mental health and substance abuse. Here are some ways the bill might impact you in the near future.

Training and professional development: HB 18 will affect professional development by adding required training on students receiving special education or Section 504 services, students who are engaged in substance abuse or those with mental health conditions, and students with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Under HB 18, these mandatory topics and others already in state law must comprise at least 25 percent of the five-year training cycle. Current law limits them to not more than 25 percent. Educators will also get double the credit hours for completing an evidence-based continuing education program in mental health first aid or grief-informed and trauma-informed care. In 2020-21, district-provided staff development can include positive behavior intervention and supports and must include training on suicide prevention, responding to grief and trauma, recognizing the signs of mental health conditions, bullying, and strategies for positive relationships among students.

Curriculum: Effective Dec. 1, 2019, the health curriculum that may be offered in your school will integrate mental and physical health instruction, to include skills such as managing emotions and maintaining positive relationships. If you are a health teacher, get ready to see the State Board of Education propose new curriculum standards (TEKS) that include science, risk factors, and causes of substance abuse.

Though HB 18 will be effective on Dec. 1, 2019, any new requirements on school districts will not take effect until the 2020-21 school year.


Next Monday, re-visit the Teach the Vote blog for ATPE’s next post in this series: Curriculum and Instruction.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 26, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


This week Congressman Kevin Brady (R-TX) filed H.R. 3934, the “Equal Treatment of Public Servants Act of 2019.” The ETPSA aims to address unfair reductions to the Social Security benefits for many educators and other public employees under what is known as the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP).

While there are many similarities between this WEP replacement bill and a previous version of the ETPSA filed by Brady in the last congress, H.R. 3934 would produce a higher benefit payment for the majority of retirees, including those future retirees who are over the age of 20. For more details on the newly filed bill, check out this blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


Today, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is meeting to discuss several important items, including the adoption of changes to allow for the implementation of the EdTPA portfolio assessment pilot for teacher certification. The board is also discussing pending rule changes resulting from bills passed by the 86th Legislature, such as the repeal of the Master Teacher certificates within HB 3. Check the Teach the Vote blog later this weekend for a more detailed summary of the meeting by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


ELECTION UPDATE: November is right around the corner. Are you registered and ready to vote? This week the Secretary of State revealed the ballot order for constitutional amendments that voters will consider in November 2019, including one that pertains to education funding. Learn more about the proposed amendment, along with updates on campaign announcements for the 2020 primary elections in this new election update post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


In Washington, DC, the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs held a hearing on school safety on Thursday, July 25, 2019. The specific focus of yesterday’s hearing was on examining state and federal recommendations for enhancing school safety against targeted violence. The committee heard from four invited witnesses: Max Schachter and Tom Hoyer, who are both parents of children killed in the Parkland School shooting; Bob Gualtieri, Sheriff of Pinellas County, Florida; and Deborah Temkin, PH.D., Senior Program Area Director, Education Child Trends. Mr. Hoyer identified three areas where policymakers can impact school safety, particularly with regard to school shootings: securing the school campus, improving mental health screening and support programs, and supporting responsible firearms ownership. Committee members focused their questions and attention on the first two issues. Archived video of the hearing and the testimony of the individual witnesses can be found at the links above.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: June 7, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


If you are a new teacher who participated in an Educator Preparation Program (EPP) and completed your first year of teaching on a standard teaching certificate, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) would like to hear from you. This survey for first year teachers is a part of the Accountability System for Educator Preparation. An email containing the survey link was sent to all eligible teachers on April 3. Be sure to complete your survey by Monday, June 17. For more information check out this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

 


On Thursday, Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law a number of bills related to school safety. Chief among them, SB 11 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood) was the omnibus school safety bill passed as a response to the deadly school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas. A full breakdown of SB 11 can be found in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

The governor also signed HB 11 by Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo), which increases mental health training requirements for school employees, as well as HB 1387 by Rep. Cole Hefner (R-Mt. Pleasant), which removes the cap on the number of school marshals that can work at a single campus. The governor’s press release on Thursday’s signings can be found here.

 


The “86th Legislative Session Highlights from ATPE” is a high level overview of the major bills impacting public education passed during the recently adjourned legislative session. This post has now been updated to include more information on bills passed this session. Continue to follow TeachtheVote.org for the most up to date information regarding public education.

 


ATPE State President Byron Hildebrand and State Vice President Tonja Grey will be traveling to the nation’s capital next week. While there they will meet with members of the Texas congressional delegation and U.S. Department of Education officials. Their meetings will feature discussions  about issues including Social Security offsets like the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP)  and the Government Pension Offset (GPO), as well as ATPE’s stance on federal voucher proposals. Byron and Tonja will be accompanied by ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes and ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter. David Pore, ATPE’s Washington-based lobbyist, will be on hand to assist and coordinate. We’ll provide updates from Washington, DC next week on Teach the Vote.


Session Recap: The big school safety bill

One of the largest education-related bills the 86th Texas Legislature passed was Senate Bill (SB) 11 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood), the omnibus school safety bill passed in the wake of the tragic school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas, in May 2018.

The final version of the ATPE-supported SB 11 contained a number of provisions, the most important of which is a school safety allotment, which may be used for a wide variety of purposes, including securing facilities, purchasing security technology, hiring security personnel, and providing training. According to the fiscal note, the allotment is expected to provide an additional $9.72 per student in average daily attendance (ADA) at a cost of roughly $100 million over the next two years. The other major provisions of SB 11 are as follows:

MULTIHAZARD EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLANS

  • Each district’s multihazard emergency operations plan must include measures to ensure employees have classroom access to direct communications with emergency personnel, and the district’s communications infrastructure must be adequate to allow for communication during an emergency.
  • A multihazard emergency operations plan must include a chain of command, provisions that address physical and psychological safety, provisions ensuring the safety of students in portable buildings and people with disabilities, provisions for providing immediate notification to parents of a significant threat, training and strategies for suicide prevention, and implementation of trauma-informed policies.
  • If a district does not comply with the requirements for its multihazard emergency operations plan, the school board must hold a public hearing. The commissioner may also appoint a conservator or board of managers to order the district to put a plan in place. If the district refuses, the conservator or board of managers may take over the district.
  • Local school safety and security committees must include law enforcement and emergency management officials, provide periodic recommendations to update the district’s multihazard emergency operations plan, consult with local law enforcement regarding ways to increase law enforcement presence near district campuses, and hold regular public meetings.
  • The Texas School Safety Center (TSSC) may audit a district’s plan and must establish a regular review cycle.

THREAT ASSESSMENT & SAFE AND SUPPORTIVE SCHOOL TEAMS

  • Each district’s board of trustees must appoint a threat assessment team and a safe and supportive school team to serve at each campus to assess threats and to develop and implement a new safe and supportive school program developed by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and the TSSC.
  • Teams must immediately report to the superintendent any determination that a person poses a threat to himself or others.
  • Teams must report demographic data back to the TEA regarding assessments and disciplinary actions.
  • TSSC must adopt model policies and procedures to assist districts in training threat assessment teams.

TEXAS CHILD MENTAL HEALTH CARE CONSORTIUM

  • The bill creates a new Texas Child Mental Health Care Consortium, established to leverage the expertise of institutions of higher education to address urgent mental health care challenges.
  • The consortium will establish a network of comprehensive child psychiatry access centers and expand telemedicine for identifying mental health needs.
  • The consortium will be funded using $99 million from state general revenue.

OTHER PROVISIONS

  • The commissioner of education must adopt rules regarding best practices for school district and charter school facilities that provide a secure and safe environment.
  • District improvement plans must include a trauma-informed care policy.
  • The commissioner must provide a waiver of operational and instructional time for a district that requires each educator to attend a school safety training course, provided that the waiver does not result in an inadequate number of minutes of instructional time for students or reduce operational and instructional time by more than 420 minutes.
  • Physical health, mental health, and suicide prevention are added to the Health curriculum.
  • The State Board of Education (SBOE) must require each district to incorporate instruction on digital citizenship and cyberbullying.
  • Suicide early warning signs, mental health, and identifying community resources for suicide risks and behavioral health concerns are added to the responsibilities of local school health advisory committees (SHAC).
  • A district that receives a bomb threat or terroristic threat must provide immediate parental notification.
  • The commissioner must adopt rules providing school evacuation procedures and designating school drills, including fire exit, lockdown, lockout, shelter-in-place, and evacuation drills.
  • The TEA must develop a rubric for use by the regional education service centers (ESC) in identifying local mental health resources. Each ESC must create an inventory of local resources and report it to the TEA.
  • The TEA must develop a statewide plan for mental health, which includes connecting people to local mental health resources. The plan must be used to revise the agency’s long-term strategic plan and progress must be reported to the legislature.
  • Districts may issue bonds for retrofitting vehicles for safety or security purposes.

Full implementation of SB 11 will require multiple entities to work in coordination with each other and districts, as well as what will likely be significant rulemaking to implement aspects of the law.

With the legislative session clock ticking, major education bills remain pending

Four days remain in the regular session of the 86th Texas Legislature, and significant deadlines for bills attach to each day that passes.

On Tuesday night, the House worked actively until the midnight hour, which was the deadline for Senate bills to be passed on second reading in order to stay alive. (The deadlines for House bills to make it out of the lower chamber and be sent over to the Senate already passed earlier this month.) This week’s related deadline for passing Senate bills on third reading and final passage on Wednesday night was less dramatic, with House members wrapping up their business by about 7 pm. Over on the other side of the capitol, the Senate worked late into the night last night to catch up and get a number of House bills passed on second and third reading.

Among the bills that survived this week’s deadlines was the ATPE-supported Senate Bill 11, containing a number of school safety and mental health initiatives that were a top priority for the governor this session. Read more about that bill’s curious journey through the legislative process here.

The deadlines hitting this week signal that the overwhelming majority of the thousands of bills filed this session are dead (for the most part), leaving only those bills that have been approved in some form by both the House and Senate. If both chambers have approved a bill in the same form, then the bill is enrolled and sent to the governor. The process is trickier for bills that get amended in different ways by the House or Senate. Each chamber will spend the next couple of days examining their bills that have come over from the other chamber with amendments and deciding what to do with them. The author of each bill can move to concur with the changes made by the other chamber, or can request the appointment of a conference committee to negotiate a final version of the bill. Friday, May 24, is the last day for House members to make such decisions.

Some of this session’s most important bills, especially relating to public education and ATPE’s legislative priorities, remain pending in conference committees at this point. These include the budget, a bill to increase contributions to the Teacher Retirement System (TRS), and a major school finance and reform bill that has dominated the conversations this session.

  • For House Bill 3, the school finance bill, senators and state representatives have taken very different approaches on how to tackle the issue of educator pay. With Speaker of the House Dennis Bonnen repeatedly proclaiming “the time is now” for school finance reform, the House approved HB 3 with an across-the-board pay raise for all school district employees except administrators. Under the leadership of Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, the Senate has favored a larger pay raise for teachers and librarians only, and senators also included in their version of HB 3 a controversial merit pay plan that has been pushed hard by Commissioner of Education Mike Morath. The conference committee for HB 3 also must grapple with differing views on how to help school districts generate sufficient funds for their operations while also facilitating property tax relief to homeowners.
  • The TRS bill, Senate Bill 12, is designed to increase state funding for the educators’ pension fund and give current retirees a 13th check, but its final language largely depends on how much money is available to achieve those goals. That decision hinges on what happens with HB 3 to address the state’s larger school finance needs.

A press conference scheduled for this afternoon by the governor, lieutenant governor, and house speaker may provide insight on the progress of these conference committees.

Sunday, May 26, is the very last day that lawmakers can vote on conference committee reports, which contain the negotiated versions of those bills. The pressure is on those legislators appointed to conference committees to work out agreements between the House and Senate language of these bills. In some cases, conference committees may add entirely new language to the bill and can ask the House and Senate to approve a motion to go “outside the bounds” of the original legislation. Even for the bills that make it all the way through the legislative process, there is another waiting period in which the governor can decide whether to exercise his veto authority. June 16 is the deadline for the governor to act.

The takeaway is that we still have a few days left to wait and see what, if any, compromises are struck on major bills like House Bill 3 and Senate Bill 12. Stay tuned to our Teach the Vote blog for updates and follow us on Twitter for major developments in these final days of the session.