Tag Archives: salary

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Oct. 30, 2020

From ATPE Governmental Relations, here are this week’s spooky news highlights in the education world:


ELECTION UPDATE: Early voting ends today, October 30, and Election Day is Tuesday, November 3. As our three-week early voting period comes to a close, Texas continues to break turnout records and is now considered a “toss-up” for which presidential candidate will win the Lone Star state. Read more election news in this week’s Texas election roundup blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

***IMPORTANT: If you requested a mail-in ballot, you may deposit your ballot at your county’s designated drop-off location by Election Day, November 3. With concerns about mail delays and the possibility of mailed ballots not being counted if they arrive too late, your best option is to drop off your ballot or vote in person. If you received a mail-in ballot but decide to vote in person, you must surrender your mail-in ballot at the polling place or risk being stuck with a provisional ballot that may not be counted.

Please continue to post your “I Voted” selfies on social media. Let us know why voting is important to you by sharing your own photo or video on social media using #WhyIVoteTXEd and tag @OfficialATPE and @Teach the Vote. Find additional voting tips here, and don’t forget to check out our candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote.


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: After piloting rapid testing in several school systems for two weeks, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and the Texas Department of Emergency Management (TDEM) announced this week that supplies and resources for COVID-19 testing will be expanded statewide to public and private school systems that opt in and meet certain requirements. To be eligible, the school system must provide in-person instruction to all students whose families request it within the next two weeks. The amount of supplies provided will depend on the COVID-19 conditions in the surrounding area and the population of the school system. Read more about the project here.

Since last week, updates to the Texas Public Schools COVID-19 dashboard show an increase in the number of positive cases reported for the week ending in October 18 for both students and staff. Previously, the data for the week ending in October 18 showed a decline, but new numbers from districts have since been added. The updated data show that between the weeks ending October 11 and October 18, the number of positive cases rose by 7.3% among students and 8.2% among staff. Positive test results are only included for students and staff who participate in on-campus instruction and activities. TEA has indicated that viral spread almost always occurs outside of the school.

Check out ATPE’s frequently updated COVID-19 FAQs and Resources for answers to common questions asked by educators. Here are some additional ATPE resources related to the pandemic:

  • Hear tips to manage pandemic anxiety in this ATPE-hosted webinar with therapist Kathryn Gates, available on demand.
  • Get answers to legal questions about COVID-19 and earn CPE by watching ATPE’s other webcasts on demand through our professional learning portal.
  • Use ATPE’s Advocacy Central website, exclusively for our members, to share your coronavirus-related concerns with state officials, including the governor and commissioner of education. Write your own message or customize one of the sample messages provided for you on the site.
  • Take a look at the public resources available in our Parent-Teacher Toolkit.

FEDERAL UPDATE: This week the two top members of the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee filed a major bipartisan bill aimed at helping Americans save more for retirement. Unfortunately, the “Securing a Strong Retirement Act of 2020” authored by U.S. Congressmen Richard Neal (D–Mass.) and Kevin Brady (R –TX) contains no provision to address the Windfall Elimination Provision that reduces many public employees’ Social Security benefits. Read more about the new bill in this blog post from ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


ATPE and 19 other pro-public education organizations sent feedback to TEA recommending 37 changes to the charter school application process to increase fairness, rigor, and transparency. Among the top recommendations were to have charter applicants include a zip code where the charter plans to locate, and to limit the charter approval process to once every two years in order to sync up with the legislative session and state budget. Read more about the recommendations in this blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


Governor Greg Abbott and TEA released a new 2019-20 compensation report this week showing the pay increases many teachers, counselors, librarians, and nurses received as a result of last session’s House Bill 3. Across the state, teachers with 0-5 years of experience received an average raise of $3,839, and teachers with more than 5 years of experience received an average raise of $5,215. Read more about the report in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


Happy Halloween from the ATPE lobby team! It’s been a scary year, and even though this year’s festivities may not be quite the same as in the past, we hope you can still enjoy a few spooky-themed classroom activities and seeing your students and colleagues in fun costumes. We wish you a not-so-scary weekend filled with candy, classic Halloween movies, and pleasant fall weather.

State issues report on educator compensation increases under HB 3

Texas Governor Greg Abbott and the Texas Education Agency (TEA) released a new 2019-20 compensation report this week showing the pay increases teachers, counselors, librarians, and nurses received as a result of last session’s House Bill (HB) 3.

HB 3, authored in 2019 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), increased the funding for public schools through a variety of provisions, such as raising the Basic Allotment and increasing the state’s Minimum Salary Schedule (MSS). The bill required that at least 30% of a district’s funding increase go toward improving compensation, with 75% of that amount dedicated to raising the salaries of teachers, counselors, librarians, and nurses, prioritizing those with more than five years of experience.

HB 3 also increased the formulas used to calculate the MSS. While this change has not been talked about as much, it was for many educators as big, or even bigger, a driver of any compensation increase they saw as a result of the bill. Increases to the MSS also shifted some of the state’s costs associated with payroll, freeing up additional dollars in all districts that could be spent on compensation increases. It is not yet clear based on the information released in this week’s new report how much each of these provisions of HB 3 contributed to the overall increases in teacher compensation.

Across the state, teachers with 0-5 years of experience received an average raise of $3,839, and teachers with more than five years of experience received an average raise of $5,215. The report indicates higher average raises in rural regions and in smaller districts across the state.

Read the governor’s press release here and find individual district compensation data here. A more detailed analysis of the compensation increases will be forthcoming here on Teach the Vote.

TEA begins deep dives on HB 3 topics

The Texas Education Agency held an information session Monday, July 8, 2019, in which Commissioner of Education Mike Morath briefed education stakeholders, including ATPE’s lobbyists, on various components of House Bill (HB) 3 that will be rolling out over the next several months.

As the session’s major tax compression and school finance bill, HB 3 orders the state and school districts to implement several programmatic changes over the coming months and years. In order to make the process more transparent, TEA has created an HB 3 resource website, which you can view here.

DEEP DIVES

TEA’s website is intended to host a number of “deep dive” updates on various components of HB 3, with a new deep dive posted every week. One of the first is an update on master teacher certifications, which are being phased out as a result of HB 3. The ATPE Governmental Relations team has received several questions about what will happen to teachers who are currently certified as reading masters. The long and short of it is that all master certificates will be converted to “legacy” master certificates and remain valid until their expiration date. Current master teachers should consider whether their underlying certifications are aligned to their current teaching assignments and may reach out to ATPE or TEA with any questions. The official TEA guidance on the subject can be viewed here. The agency’s next deep dive will address compensatory education and is scheduled for release this Thursday, July 11, on the TEA’s HB 3 website. A list of scheduled deep dives can be found here.

SCHOOL FINANCE

The school finance bill should provide additional funding for most districts, worth an average of $635 more per average daily attendance (ADA). Along with the new funding, HB 3 orders school districts to do several things and suggests they do several more. Commissioner Morath conceded to stakeholders Monday that the state has not calculated whether the additional funding schools receive will be enough to do all of what they are being asked, and he indicated that it is likely that roughly 15 school districts will not receive sufficient funding to cover the increase in the educator minimum salary schedule (MSS) mandated under HB 3.

TEACHER PAY

Under HB 3, districts will have the option of accessing a “teacher incentive allotment” if they develop a local program to offer differentiated pay based on teacher quality. This allotment may provide participating districts from $3,000 to $32,000 in additional funding per teacher who qualifies under an approved local program, but it is important to note that this funding will not go directly to the teacher. Instead, that money will go to the district with the requirement that 90 percent of it be spent on compensation for teachers at the participating campus. Schools with existing programs will likely see additional funding in September 2020 for programs in effect during the upcoming school year, and new programs will likely be eligible to receive funding by 2021.

OTHER RULES IMPACTING EDUCATORS

The school finance bill also expanded the “do not hire registry” of public school educators who have been convicted of an inappropriate relationship to non-certified employees. This change is effective immediately, and a deep dive on this topic is scheduled to be released by TEA before the start of the fall semester.

Every teacher in kindergarten through grade 3 must attend a reading academy within the next three years at the school district’s expense. Each academy is expected to include a five-day summer institute, two days of pull-outs, and 12 coaching sessions during the year, plus three days the following summer. Educators will not receive a state stipend for attendance, but the agency indicated there is an expectation that districts will provide them with a stipend. All future K-3 educators will be required to cover the reading academy’s curriculum before placement, which means reading academy instruction will transfer to educator preparation programs (EPPs) going into the future.

New teachers certified for pre-K through grade 6 will also be required to demonstrate proficiency in the science of teaching reading (STR) by January 1, 2021. The agency is currently working on a test for STR proficiency.

OUTCOMES FUNDING

Districts may receive additional outcomes-based funding under HB 3 for each annual graduate above a certain threshold percentage who checks a box indicating they are college, career, or military ready (CCMR). Districts are expected to receive money this year for Class of 2018 graduates.

ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL DAYS

HB 3 allows schools to add instructional days beyond the current minimum of 180 days up to 210 days. These days will not be subject to compulsory attendance and will be optional at each district’s discretion. The funding will not cover the full cost of operating schools on those days, and the agency acknowledged that many districts may simply use this program to subsidize their existing summer school programs.

You can view the complete slide deck TEA presented to stakeholders on Monday by clicking here. This slide deck includes graphical presentations on many of HB 3’s main components. The agency will continue to produce informational content each week, with compensatory education scheduled for this week and pre-K scheduled for next week. You can see what the agency has already published by clicking on the HB 3 resource page.