Tag Archives: runoff

Runoff Spotlight – Get to know the candidates in House District 62

This post is the latest in ATPE’s blog series for Teach the Vote where we are highlighting some of the high-profile primary races that will be decided by a runoff election on May 22. We’re only a few months away from the start of the 2019 legislative session, where lawmakers will be making such crucial decisions as how to fund our schools, achieve and measure student progress, and provide for competitive educator pay and benefits. The 2018 elections will determine who gets to make those decisions and more, making it extremely important for all eligible educators to exercise their right to vote. Learn more about candidates running in the Republican primary runoff for House District (HD) 62 in today’s spotlight blog post. To read even more about the candidates’ views on public education, check out their full profiles on Teach the Vote by clicking on either candidate’s name below.

The Candidates: Brent Lawson (R) vs. Reggie Smith (R)

Texas House District (HD) 62 covers a section of Northeast Texas that includes Sherman, Bonham, and part of Collinsville. The district was previously represented by Rep. Larry Phillips (R-Sherman) who resigned in April.

Candidate Reggie Smith is an attorney who resides in Van Alstyne with his family. In his response to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, he stated that his top priorities for public education would be to reform the school finance system, reduce reliance on local property taxes for school funding, reduce standardized testing, and empower parents and teachers. Smith has been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC .

Candidate Brent Lawson is an electrician engineer who resides with his wife in Grayson County. Lawson declined to respond to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, however he is endorsed by the Texas Home School Coalition PAC, which supports using public funds for private and home-schools and by Texans for Fiscal Responsibility (Empower Texans), a group that supports budget cuts and limiting state spending on public education.

For additional information on this race or the primary runoff elections in general, contact ATPE Government Relations at government@atpe.org.

Are you ready for the May 22 runoffs?

If you’re a frequent reader of our blog, you know that ATPE’s lobby team often writes about the importance of primary elections in Texas. In fact, most of our state’s elected officials are seated as a result of primary election results instead of the general election that occurs in November. This is a result of redistricting that happens every decade, when electoral maps are redrawn, often in a strategic manner that will allow the political party holding that seat at the time to have an advantage in keeping that seat in future elections. Some districts favor one political party so heavily that races to fill those seats may only attract candidates from a single political party, meaning that the entire contest is decided by the primary. Many of those races conclude in March, but sometimes a runoff is required if no candidate earns a majority of the vote in the initial primary.

Here in Texas, we’ve got an important primary runoff election scheduled for May 22, 2018. That’s why ATPE is encouraging you to read about the runoff elections coming up this month and find out if you’re eligible to vote in one or more of the runoffs. Those eligible to vote in this runoff election include certain registered voters who participated in March’s primary elections, as well as registered voters who did not vote in either of the previous party primaries.

Eligibility for voting in the primaries is as easy as matching apples to apples and oranges to oranges.  If you voted in a March primary, you must vote in the same party’s primary runoff election. For example, if you voted in the Republican primary in March, you may only vote in a Republican primary runoff election in May. If you voted in the Democratic primary in March, you may only vote in a Democratic primary runoff election. However, if you are a registered voter who did not participate in either of the party’s primaries back in March, then you are still eligible to participate in the runoff election, but you must choose which primary runoff to participate in. You cannot vote in both primary runoffs or vote in the runoff of the party opposite the primary you chose back in March.

Early voting for the runoffs will take place May 14 – 18, 2018. Runoff election day is May 22, 2018. Most polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on voting days, but you should check the times and locations locally to find information on your polling place.  Don’t forget to bring an acceptable form of identification with you when you vote, and print out any notes ahead of time, as cell phones must be turned off at the polls.

To help you learn about your choices at the polls, ATPE shares profiles here on Teach the Vote for all candidates running for the Texas House, Texas Senate, Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or State Board of Education. The profiles help educators and other voters find out more about the candidates’ stances on education issues, in particular. This month ATPE is also spotlighting on our Teach the Vote blog a few of the runoff races where education has emerged as a preeminent topic. Check out highlights of these races using the links below:

To view a list of all the runoff candidates whose profiles are featured on Teach the Vote, check out this related blog post. If you have additional questions about runoff voting or candidates please contact ATPE Governmental Relations or call 1-800-777-ATPE.

Runoff Spotlight – Get to know the candidates in House District 54

ATPE has been taking a closer look at some of the Texas primary election runoffs that will be decided on May 22, 2018. If you’ve been following this series of posts on our blog, you know that the outcome of the primary runoffs will have a major impact on the direction our Texas Legislature will take in the 2019 legislative session. Issues at stake will include such matters as how we fund our schools, what type of healthcare benefits we’ll provide teachers, how much our educators will be paid, what we should teach our students, and how we will measure the progress of students and schools. Today’s spotlight post is about the Republican primary runoff for House District (HD) 54. If you or your friends and family are eligible to vote in this runoff election, learn more about the candidates and their stances on public education issues. Click on a candidate’s name below to view his full profile on Teach the Vote.

The Candidates: Rep. Scott Cosper (R) vs. Brad Buckley (R)

Texas House District (HD) 54 spans a small section of central Texas that includes Harker Heights, Lampasas, Lometa, Salado, Kempner, and parts of Killeen. The district is currently represented by Rep. Scott Cosper (R-Killeen) who has held the seat since 2017.

Prior to representing the district, Cosper served as the Mayor of Killeen, and before that he served on the Killeen City Council. In his response to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, Cosper stated that his top priorities for public education are to ensure the adequate and efficient funding of public schools and to address the funding challenges facing TRS-Care and TRS Active-Care so that those healthcare plans are affordable for current and retired educators. Rep. Cosper has been endorsed in the 2018 primary and runoff elections by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC.

Candidate Brad Buckley is a veterinarian who resides in Killeen. He declined to respond to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey.

For additional information on this race or the primary runoff elections in general, contact ATPE Government Relations at government@atpe.org.

Runoff Spotlight – Get to know the candidates in House District 8

ATPE has been taking a closer look at some of the Texas primary election runoffs that will be decided on May 22, 2018. Many of these races will play an important role in determining how the 86th Legislature responds to challenges such as fixing our broken school finance system and determining teacher pay and benefits when it convenes for the 2019 legislative session. To help educators and other voters make informed decisions in these critical runoffs, we’re showcasing some of the candidates’ stances on public education issues. Today, we’re focusing on the Republican primary runoff for House District (HD) 8. Click on each candidate’s name below to view a full profile on Teach the Vote with even more information.

The Candidates: Cody Harris (R) vs. Thomas McNutt (R)

Texas House District (HD) 8 covers a swath of Northeast Texas spanning east to west from Palestine to Corsicana to Hillsboro. The district is currently being represented by Rep. Byron Cook (R-Corsicana) who announced late last year that he would not seek re-election.

Candidate Cody Harris resides in Palestine and owns a real estate business that specializes in ranch management and development. According to his response on the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, his top priorities for public education are reducing unfunded mandates on local ISDs, reforming education so that less standardized testing is required, and providing districts with more local control. Harris has been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC.

Candidate Thomas McNutt lives in Corsicana and is the Vice President of the Collin Street Bakery. He also ran unsuccessfully for the same seat in 2016. McNutt declined to respond to both the 2018 and 2016 ATPE Candidate Surveys. McNutt was endorsed by the Texas Home School Coalition, which supports using public funds for private and home-schools, and by Texans for Fiscal Responsibility (Empower Texans), a group that supports budget cuts and limiting state spending on public education.

For additional information on this race or the primary runoff elections in general, contact ATPE Government Relations at government@atpe.org.

Runoff Spotlight – Get to know the candidates in House District 4

When it comes to public education, the Texas Legislature has incredible power to decide how our students are educated, how our schools are funded, and how our educators are treated. From per-pupil funding to student testing to teacher pay and benefits, these issues and more will be at the forefront of the 2019 legislative session, making the 2018 election cycle extremely critical. Most of the legislators who will make up the ranks of the 86th legislature next January were decided on March 6 when Texas held its primary elections, and the bulk of the rest are looking toward competitive races in November. For the residents of a few key districts, however, the decision on who will represent them next session will be made on May 22, 2018, which is the date of the primary runoff election.

ATPE is taking a closer look at some of the runoffs that will be decided in May, where the candidates squaring off against each other have identified public education as a key campaign issue. Today, we’re analyzing the Republican primary runoff for House District (HD) 4. To learn more about the candidates vying for this seat, click on the candidate’s name and you will be taken to that candidate’s full profile on Teach the Vote.

The Candidates: Keith Bell (R) vs Stuart Spitzer (R)

HD 4 covers all of Kaufman and most of Henderson counties. The incumbent Rep. Lance Gooden (R) is running for a U.S. congressional seat, creating an open seat.

Candidate Keith Bell is a business owner and rancher who has served on the Forney ISD school board for 20 years. Responding to the ATPE Candidate Survey, Bell has said enhancing school funding is his biggest priority, should he get elected. He has been endorsed by the pro-public education groups Texas Parent PAC and Texans for Public Education.

Candidate Stuart Spitzer represented HD 4 during the 84th legislative session before losing his seat to Gooden. While he did not respond to this year’s ATPE Candidate Survey, Dr. Spitzer stated in response to the 2014 ATPE candidate survey that he believes TRS is a part of the “nanny” state and called 401(k) style investment of teacher retirement dollars a “liberty issue,” adopting language  commonly used by  those who support dismantling the TRS defined benefit pension system. Spitzer has been endorsed by the Texas Home School Coalition, a pro-voucher organization, and by Empower Texans/Texans For Fiscal Responsibility, which supports limiting state spending on public education; eliminating educators’ right to use dues deduction; private school vouchers; and privatizing the management of existing public schools.

For additional information on this race or the primary runoff elections in general, contact ATPE Government Relations at government@atpe.org.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: April 27, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


This May, many Texans will be making not one, but two trips to the ballot box. ATPE wants to ensure that all educators are aware of the two important elections taking place next month.

Saturday, May 5th is the uniform election date when municipal propositions, elections, and issues will be decided. Meanwhile, Tuesday, May 22nd is when state level primary runoff elections will be held. While any registered voter can participate in the May 5th municipal election, participation in the primary runoffs depends on whether you previously voted in the March primaries and in which primary election you voted.

For more information about the candidates and your eligibility to vote in the upcoming primary runoffs, check out this new blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter.

 


Texas has a new “Grow Your Own” grant program designed by the Texas Rural Schools Taskforce to address  challenges faced by rural school districts and foster a more robust and diverse teaching force. This week, TEA released the names of the 25 school districts that received the 2018-19 “Grow Your Own” grant. Read more about them in this blog post from ATPE Governmental Relations Specialist Bria Moore.

 


The Texas Education Agency has finalized its plan to address special education. Professional development for special education teachers; resources and outreach for parents of special needs children; funding at the district level for students previously denied access to special education services; and additional staffing and resources were the four final measures proposed by TEA in its efforts to redress issues plaguing special education in the state. While the proposed measures would cost the state $212 million over the next five years, TEA is unable to commit additional funds to support the plan leaving the burden to fund these measures on the shoulders of the 86th Legislature which is set to reconvene in 2019. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann explains more about the plan in this blog post.

 


Houston ISD has notified district teachers of its plan to begin staff layoffs. As reported by the Houston Chronicle this afternoon, district employees received correspondence informing then that an unspecified number of layoffs would begin shortly due to budget constraints in the district. The financial strain of Hurricane Harvey coupled with new recapture woes have resulted in a projected deficit of $115 million for the district. The HISD administration has said that the number of layoffs will depend on how many teachers leave the district through attrition at the end of this school year.

Today’s announcement comes on the heels of a highly contentious HISD board meeting earlier this week that was shut down when protests broke out over a planned vote to turn over management of some of the district’s struggling campuses to a charter school operator. That move is part of a plan authorized by new legislation that ATPE opposed in 2017. Schools otherwise facing closure have an option to partner with charter holders for a temporary pause in their progressive sanctions, and HISD has proposed this course of action for 10 of its campuses despite heavy opposition from the community. Waco ISD also took similar action this week, opting to partner with a charter operator to avoid the closure of five struggling campuses in that district.

Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates on this developing story.

 


May elections – A Texas two-fer

Most everyone knows about the general election in November, and more folks are becoming aware of the importance of the March primaries, but May is also an important, albeit confusing election month. Like November, May hosts a general uniform election date. This year that election is on Saturday, May 5th. But the month of May, also hosts the separate primary runoff election date, which this year is on Tuesday, May 22nd.

In addition to municipal ballot issues, many of the school districts around the state hold their school board and school bond elections on the May 5th uniform election date. These are important elections that set the tone for the local policy decisions and funding of your community’s public schools. As a part of adopting an overall culture of voting, Texas educators should always vote during this election.

What is not on the May 5th ballot are any state or federal candidates. Those candidates* are on the May 22nd primary runoff ballot. This year’s state level runoff races include:

Governor                         D           Andrew White vs. Lupe Valdez

SBOE 12                         D          Suzanne Smith vs. Laura Malone-Miller

Senate District 17           D           Rita Lucido vs. Fran Watson

House District 4              R           Keith Bell vs. Stuart Spitzer

House District 8              R           Cody Harris vs. Thomas McNutt

House District 13            R           Jill Wolfskill vs. Ben Leman

House District 37            D           Rene Oliveira vs. Alex Dominguez

House District 45            D           Rebecca Bell-Metereau vs. Erin Zwierner

House District 46            D           Chito Vela vs. Sheryl Cole

House District 47            D           Vikki Goodwin vs. Elaina Fowler

House District 54            R           Scott Cosper vs. Brad Buckley

House District 62            R           Reggie Smith vs. Brent Lawson

House District 64            D           Mat Pruneda vs. Andrew Morris

House District 107          R           Joe Ruzicka vs. Deanna Maria Metzger

House District 109          D           Deshaundra Lockhart Jones vs. Carl Sherman

House District 121          R           Steve Allison vs. Matt Bebe

House District 133          D           Sandra Moore vs. Marty Schexnayder

*To see more about each candidate, click on the candidate’s name above.

While everyone who is registered to vote can cast a ballot in the May 5th election, you must be eligible to vote in the May 22nd runoff election. So who is eligible and qualified to vote in the runoffs? The simple answer is anyone who is registered to vote and who did not vote for the opposing party during the March primary election. Some examples:

  • If you voted in the Republican primary election in March, you are eligible to vote in the Republican runoff in May.
  • If you didn’t vote at all in the March primary, you ARE eligible to vote in either runoff election (but not both) on May 22nd.
  • If you voted in the Republican primary election in March, you would not be eligible to vote in the Democratic runoff election in May.

Regardless of who you vote for in March or May, you may vote for a candidate of any party or even independent candidates in November. Your (wise) decision to vote in a partisan primary in March/May is in no way binding on your November ballot.

If you have additional questions about voting or candidates please contact ATPE Governmental Relations or call 1-800-777-ATPE

Don’t miss the next voter registration deadline

Texas has two elections coming up in May 2018 for which the deadlines to register to vote are quickly approaching.

First there is an election date on May 5, 2018, for local political offices. You must register by this Thursday, April 5, in order to be eligible to vote in your local elections next month.

Next up, on May 22, 2018, many voters will head back to the polls for runoffs in several primary election contests. You are eligible to vote in a political party’s runoff election as long as you did not vote in another party’s primary back in March. But you must also be registered before the deadline! Your last chance to register to vote in a primary runoff election this year is April 23.

For additional information on registering to vote, visit VoteTexas.gov. Learn more about which races are headed to a runoff in this article from the Texas Tribune. Also, be sure to check out our candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote.

 

Now that you’ve voted in the primaries…

Congratulations, you made it through the March 6 primaries!

Okay, now what?

I’m glad you asked! But before we get to the answer, let’s start with a 30,000-foot review of what went down last Tuesday.

Less than 24 hours before the polls opened on primary election day, the Dallas Morning News reported that Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton had escalated his attempts to intimidate educators and suppress their vote. It was the latest assault by a band of politicians bought and paid for by Empower Texans, a funded by a handful of West Texas billionaires and obsessed with attacking educators and their allies.

Turns out, they had good reason to want to shut educators up.

When the dust cleared Wednesday morning, the anti-education organization and its accomplices lost more than a dozen races. As politics watchers surveyed the fallout, most reached similarly damning conclusions regarding the erstwhile political puppet-masters at Empower Texans. At the same time, 72 percent of pro-education candidates supported by ATPE PAC won their races outright, and another eight percent are headed to May 2018 runoffs as the top vote getters.

Compounding the troubles facing public education opponents, the Texas Civil Rights Project (TCRP) filed a public information request this week seeking to uncover communications between Empower Texans and Paxton, as well as state Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston), the Texas Public Policy Foundation, and others “regarding possible coordination to intimidate voters.”

“Scare tactics, intimidation, and voter suppression have no place in our democracy,” said Beth Steven, director of TCRP’s Voting Rights Program. “Unfortunately, the Orwellian-named ‘Empower Texans’ apparently believes that by scaring educators away from teaching young people about civic participation, they will stem the tide of a new and upcoming generation of voters. More jarring, however, is the possibility that our state’s chief law enforcement official is enabling these dangerous efforts. We sent this request to uncover any communications between the Attorney General’s Office and groups that are trying to suppress the vote. We need to restore trust and faith in our democracy, and that begins with finding out who is attempting to keep Texans away from the ballot box — and why.”

The education community’s biggest antagonist, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, survived his primary intact – yet not necessarily unscathed. As Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey pointed out, more than 300,000 Texas Republicans voted against Patrick and for public education supporter Scott Milder. After losing the primary, Milder announced he would split his ticket in November to vote for the Democrat, Mike Collier, in that race.

Ultimately both Republicans and Democrats exhibited record turnout, but University of Texas Professor Joshua Blank warns against reading too much into how turnout on either side translates to performance in the November general election. Professor James R. Henson offered a more in-depth analysis in this post for The Hill.

But before we turn our focus to November, there’s still some unfinished business in the party primaries – and THAT’S what’s next!

We’re watching 17 races in which no candidate earned more than 50 percent of the vote. The top two vote getters in each of these races will show down in a May 22 runoff election to determine who will represent their party on the November ballot. Early voting for these races runs from May 14 to May 18. You may only vote in the runoff of the party in which you cast your primary ballot. For example, if you voted in the Republican primary, you can only vote in the Republican runoff. Likewise, if you voted in the Democratic primary, you can only vote in the Democratic runoff. You cannot vote in the Democratic runoff after voting in the Republican primary, or vice-versa.

Just as with the March 6 primaries, the outcomes of the May 22 runoffs are incredibly important. We encourage everyone to consult our CANDIDATES page and make plans to vote!

REPUBLICAN RUNOFF RACES

  • HD4: Former Rep. Stuart Spitzer (46%) vs. Keith Bell (26%)
  • HD8: Cody Harris (45%) vs. Thomas McNutt (39%)
  • HD13: Jill Wolfskill (39%) vs. Ben Leman (36%)
  • HD54: Rep. Scott Cosper (45%) vs. Brad Buckley (42%)
  • HD62: Reggie Smith (46%) vs. Brent Lawson (34%)
  • HD107: Deanna Metzger (45%) vs. Joe Ruzicka (27%)
  • HD121: Matt Beebe (29%) vs. Steve Allison (26%)

DEMOCRATIC RUNOFF RACES

  • GOV: Lupe Valdez (43%) vs. Andrew White (27%)
  • SD17: Rita Lucido (49%) vs. Fran Watson (35%)
  • HD37: Rep. Rene Oliveira (48%) vs. Alex Dominguez (36%)
  • HD45: Rebecca Bell-Metereau (45%) vs. Erin Zwiener (31%)
  • HD46: Chito Vela (40%) vs. Sheryl Cole (38%)
  • HD47: Vikki Goodwin (34%) vs. Elaina Fowler (29%)
  • HD64: Mat Pruneda (42%) vs. Andrew Morris (39%)
  • HD109: Deshaundra Lockhart Jones (45%) vs. Carl Sherman (40%)
  • HD133: Sandra Moore (49.92%) vs. Marty Schexnayder (41%)
  • ED12: Suzanne Smith (48%) vs. Laura Malone-Miller (26%)

Runoffs typically see some of the lowest turnout, as far as elections go. It’s not unusual for runoffs to see half of the voter turnout typically seen in the primaries. The problem is that the enemies of public education are counting on educators continuing this trend and sitting at home May 22. There is a very real risk that your efforts to support pro-public education candidates in these races will be for nothing if educators do not show up again in force.

The bottom line: Educators made a statement on March 6. The job isn’t finished yet, but we’re getting there.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 5, 2016

Read highlights of this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


On Wednesday of this week, the Senate Education Committee convened for an interim hearing on ideas that might evolve into potential changes to the state’s school finance system. The committee has been tasked with studying an interim charge on “performance-based” funding for public schools, as an alternative to attendance-based funding methods and finance formulas that take into account the instructional needs of students. ATPE Lobbyists Monty Exter and Kate Kuhlmann attended the hearing and provided a blog post about it for Teach the Vote this week. Also check out The Texas Observer‘s coverage of the hearing, which includes a quote from Exter and is linked to the blog post from yesterday. The committee has other upcoming interim hearings scheduled to discuss a variety of topics from innovation districts to technology to school choice. Follow our blog and @TeachtheVote on Twitter for the latest developments as interim hearings continue.

 


ThinkstockPhotos-92037734Voters in San Antonio’s House District 120 have selected a new state representative to serve the remainder of the unexpired term of former Rep. Ruth Jones McClendon (D-San Antonio) who resigned earlier this year. Laura Thompson, running as independent candidate in the special election, defeated Lou Miller (D) in the August 2 runoff by a reported margin of just 50 votes. Thompson will only hold the post for a short period of time during the interim. Barbara Gervin-Hawkins (D) won a primary runoff election earlier this year to become the only candidate on the November 2016 general election ballot vying for the seat in a new term that will begin January 2017.

On Saturday, precinct chairs in Harris County will decide who should replace outgoing Rep. Borris Miles (D-Houston) in House District 146. Miles was running for re-election unopposed this fall, but now he has been tapped to replace Sen. Rodney Ellis on the ballot for Senate District 13, which is also an unopposed seat. Ellis is giving up that seat with intent to become a county commissioner, as we’ve reported recently. According to the Harris County Democratic Party, candidates with a verified interest in Miles’s House seat include Erica Lee Carter, Larry Blackmon, Valencia L. Williams, Rashad L. Cave, and Shawn Thierry. We’ll report on the precinct chairs’ decision next week on Teach the Vote.

 


Commissioner of Education Mike Morath released an adopted rule this week for implementation of a 2015 law requiring video surveillance of certain classrooms serving students in special education programs. The final rule as adopted includes some changes made in response to public comments. ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter provided details on the revisions in a blog post earlier today.

 


ATPE submitted written input this week to the U.S. Department of Education on its proposed accountability rules implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). As ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann reported Tuesday on our blog, our comments raised concerns about the department’s proposed requirement for summative performance ratings of schools. As with the controversial “A-F” accountability labels that the Texas legislature has already mandated that our state’s schools receive, we have trepidation about states assigning overly simplistic summative ratings to schools that may not always reflect the many complex factors that contribute to a school’s overall performance. Read Kate’s blog post for more on ATPE’s recommendations for more holistic approaches to accountability ratings in the federal rules.

 


Kuhlmann SBEC testimony Aug 2016The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is holding its regular meeting today and welcoming new gubernatorial appointees to the board as we reported last week. Today’s agenda includes proposed changes to disciplinary rules and the Educators’ Code of Ethics to create mandatory minimum sanctions for educators found in possession of, under the influence of, or testing positive for drugs and alcohol on school property. The board is also voting on changes that have been in the works for many months to increase the rigor of educator preparation and ensure that new teachers enter the classroom well-prepared and with the support of experienced mentors and supervisors. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann is testifying at today’s meeting and will provide an update on the board’s actions.

 


Best of luck to all educators and students heading back to school this month! 

Four children waiting in a row outside the school bus