Tag Archives: runoff

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 21, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


The Board of Trustees of the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) met this week to discuss such topics as premiums for the state’s healthcare plan for retired educators. After receiving a more favorable update on the estimated shortfall for TRS-Care and hearing lawmakers indicate that the legislature will provide needed funding, the board intends to try to keep premiums and benefits stable. Read more about the board’s discussions this week in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter.

 


Senator-elect Pete Flores (R-San Antonio)

Voters in Senate District 19 turned out for a special election runoff on Tuesday to decide who will represent them in the Texas Senate until the 2020 elections. Gathering 53% of the vote, Republican Pete Flores was the race’s clear winner and will be filling the seat left vacant by former Sen. Carlos Uresti who resigned this year.

Flores’s win flips the seat long held by Democrats into the Republican column heading into the 2019 legislative session. The change makes it that much easier for the upper chamber’s Republican super-majority to pass Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick’s agenda, especially with another Democratic vacancy generated by the anticipated race to replace Senate District 6’s Sen. Sylvia Garcia, who is running for Congress. Garcia’s seat would not be filled until a special election occurs well after next year’s legislative session begins.

ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins breaks down how this impacts the upcoming legislative session and what it means for contests in the November election in this blog post.

 


Are you already registered to vote? If so, don’t stop there…  take the next step!

Tuesday, September 25 is National Voter Registration Day, and thousands of volunteers across the U.S. will be mobilized to help others register to vote and get informed about elections. Perhaps if you’re already to vote you can go the extra mile by asking friends and family if they’ve registered and reminding them of these important dates:

  • The deadline to register to vote in November is Oct. 9, 2018.
  • Early voting runs Oct. 22-Nov. 2, 2018.
  • Election Day is Nov. 6, 2018. 

You can also encourage your friends and family to check out the Candidates section of TeachtheVote.org for more information on the candidates vying for seats in the Texas House, Texas Senate, State Board of Education, Governor, or Lieutenant Governor.

The first Friday of early voting, Oct. 26, is Student Voting Day in Texas. Encourage the students you know to get registered and participate in the upcoming election. Voting is more than just a civic duty; it’s how we work together to create positive change in our communities and its important that we get everyone involved.

 


Recap: SD 19 upset significantly alters Senate math

An upset victory by Republican Pete Flores in the Senate District (SD 19) special runoff election last night will have a significant impact on the balance of power in the Texas Senate. It’s also a wake-up call.

Flores, a retired game warden, beat the Democratic favorite, former U.S. Rep. Pete Gallego, in Tuesday’s special runoff election to finish the unexpired term of Democratic state Sen. Carlos Uresti, who resigned earlier this year in scandal. That seat will now move to the Republican column until at least 2020, when Flores will come up for reelection.

There were warning signs early on that the SD 19 race would likely be close. The district has historically elected Democratic state senators, and broke for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump in 2016 by a margin of 11.5 percent. Yet just two years earlier during the 2014 mid-term elections, Republican Greg Abbott edged Democrat Wendy Davis in SD 19 by 0.1 percent in the gubernatorial race, and Republican U.S. Sen. John Cornyn outpaced Democratic challenger David Alameel by 7.3 percent.

The timing of Sen. Uresti’s resignation allowed Gov. Abbott to set a special election in the middle of summer, guaranteeing a low-turnout special election that would mitigate Democrats’ general election advantage and allow the race to turn on whichever party could do a better job of getting out the vote (GOTV).

For context, SD 19 recorded 478,000 registered voters in 2016. Based on that number, roughly 5.4 percent of voters participated in the July 31 special election and 9.2 percent turned out for the September 18 special runoff. By contrast, turnout in SD 19 for the 2016 presidential election was 52.7 percent, and turnout for the 2014 mid-term elections was 27.7 percent.

As we previously reported on Teach the Vote, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick was keen to flip the SD 19 seat from blue to red in order to boost his party’s mathematical advantage in the Texas Senate. The lieutenant governor and his allies spent a prodigious amount of money in support of Flores between the special election and the special runoff. We’ll take a closer look at that spending as the official figures become available.

All of this had an appreciable effect on the final outcome. According to the Texas Secretary of State, roughly 26,000 people voted in the July 31 special election. More than 44,000 voted in the September 18 special runoff election — representing a 69.75 percent increase in turnout. Flores ultimately won with 53 percent of the vote, compared to 47 percent for Gallego.

So what does this mean?

Immediately, it means that the Texas Senate is now composed of 21 Republicans and 10 Democrats. Under the current 3/5 rule, the lieutenant governor only needs 19 votes for his party to pass major legislation, which in the recent past has included voucher bills aimed at stripping public school funding and anti-teacher payroll deduction bills. These bills passed the Texas Senate largely along party-line votes. As its newest member, Flores brings to the Senate an alliance with Lt. Gov. Patrick and his openly expressed support for private school vouchers.

Furthermore, outgoing state Sen. Sylvia Garcia’s (D-Houston) failure to effectively secure a clear retirement date means that the 2019 legislative session will begin with a vacant seat, for a total of 21 Republicans and 9 Democrats in the Senate. Voters in SD 6 will choose Garcia’s successor in another special election that will be held while the legislature is in session next spring. Until then, only 18 votes will be needed to pass major legislation out of the upper chamber.

At the 30,000-foot level, Tuesday’s outcome in San Antonio highlights the importance of two things: First, the November elections are of even more critical importance. Second, turnout is paramount.

While it’s easy to think of elections in terms of Democrats versus Republicans, this discounts the reality that many Republican officeholders — even some in the Senate — support public education. The challenge is that Senate Republicans are under an enormous amount of pressure from the lieutenant governor to cast anti-education votes. The surest path to helping them is to change the math by electing senators who are not beholden to the lieutenant governor.

Of course, electing pro-public education candidates means showing up. Make no mistake, the forces trying to defund and privatize our neighborhood schools do not suffer from voter apathy. They are capable of raising and spending countless millions of dollars in order to motivate low-information voters to turn out and vote against their own interests and those of their children. The only way to fight back is to ensure that you and everyone you know makes it to the polls this November to cast an informed vote for public education.

To put it simply: If we don’t vote, we will lose.

If that happens, not only do we lose, but our schools and our kids lose as well. The result of the special runoff election Tuesday came as a surprise to many, but it should not come as a shock. It should serve as a reminder of the powers at play and the stakes of sitting out.

 

 

Why November is important: It’s the maths, y’all

Politics involves a lot of math.

A candidate needs fifty percent of voters plus one in order to get elected to office. The Texas Legislature meets for 140 days, but can’t pass legislation until 60 of those days have passed – unless acting upon an emergency item declared by the governor.

Here’s another equation for you:

The Texas Senate consists of 31 members and requires a vote of three-fifths of those present and voting to pass most major legislation. That means if everyone is present, a bill needs the support of 19 senators to pass. In the current makeup of the Texas Senate, 20 are Republicans and 11 are Democrats.

This actually is an important bit of math for supporters of public education.

In the past legislative session alone, we’ve seen legislation harmful to public education pass along largely party line votes under the direction of Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick. This includes voucher bills to strip funding from public schools in order to create taxpayer-funded subsidies for private schools. It also includes payroll deduction bills designed to rob teachers of their influence at the Capitol by making it more difficult to join educator associations such as ATPE.

A recent article by the Texas Tribune put the Senate math in the context of the 2018 general election, and pointed out that the outcomes of a handful of races this November could have some very significant ramifications when it comes to the next legislative session.

Multiple senators who voted for vouchers and against teachers last session are currently up for reelection and facing serious challenges this November. The Texas Tribune highlighted three of the most high-profile races in which sitting senators now find themselves in the hot seat, in large part due to their past anti-public education votes: Sens. Don Huffines (R-Dallas), Konni Burton (R-Colleyville), and Joan Huffman (R-Houston).

If just one of those incumbents lose their race, a single Republican could defy the lieutenant governor and stop a voucher bill in its tracks. If two are defeated, the lieutenant governor won’t have enough votes to force through anti-education bills along party lines as he did last session.

In the latter case, members would be forced to work across party lines – and the balance of power would shift away from the lieutenant governor, giving individual members more freedom to vote in the interests of their constituents, rather than party leaders.

There’s also a twist.

The special runoff election underway this week to fill the Senate District 19 seat previously held by a Democrat has attracted the lieutenant governor’s attention; Lt. Gov. Patrick knows flipping that seat would change the math again. That’s why it’s no surprise to see Patrick loudly campaigning for the pro-voucher Republican candidate running in that San Antonio-area special election that will be decided on Tuesday, Sept. 18:

Also, an unresolved dispute between Gov. Greg Abbott and retiring Sen. Sylvia Garcia (D-Houston) means the 2019 legislative session will begin with the Senate one seat short. That lowers the magic number for passing bills via one party’s super-majority to only 18.

It’s tempting to look at this all in terms of “Rs” and “Ds,” but that ignores important issues like public education, where there are Republicans who disagree with the lieutenant governor, but either don’t number enough to overcome the magic number or fear the lieutenant governor’s current absolute power. Changing the math changes both.

File it under the list of reasons this upcoming general election is important. Maybe your friends aren’t the type to get hyped up about voting. Maybe they just don’t find elections that exciting. I offer an alternative appeal:

Math!

Now that’s exciting!

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 7, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Testifying at the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Article III this week, ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter advocated for an expansion of the list of free and near-free drugs covered by TRS-Care. The subcommittee, which met Wednesday, oversees the state’s education budget, including the Teacher Retirement System’s pension fund and health insurance. A persistent lack of funding over the years has lead to an increased burden on both active and retired educators who have seen healthcare premiums rise with no increase in the percentage contributed to their pensions. The urgent need for more funding and resources for the TRS system will be a hot button issue during next year’s 86th Legislative Session, one that ATPE lobbyists will be tackling head on. Find out more about Wednesday’s subcommittee hearing in this article by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

 


The 2018 general election is right around the corner, but even closer than that is a special election runoff in Texas Senate District 19 (SD 19). The special election was called when former Sen. Carlos Uresti stepped down following his felony conviction. While all Texans are not be able to participate in this one special election, all Texans will feel the effects of its outcome as San Antonio residents decide who will take one of the Texas Senate’s 31 seats.

Next Monday through Friday, Sept. 10-14, voters in the district that runs from the greater San Antonio metroplex to the tiny town of Orla, Texas, will have a say in whether Democrat Pete Gallego or Republican Pete Flores represents them in the state’s upper chamber when the legislature convenes in January. For those who miss early voting, the special election runoff for SD 19 will take place Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018.

 


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) posted its Legislative Appropriations Request (LAR) this week ahead of formally presenting it to the Legislative Budget Board next Wednesday. LARs lay out all of an agency’s intended expenditures for the upcoming biennium and are, as a group, the basis for what will eventually become the state budget. TEA’s LAR includes not only agency-level spending but also all of the funding that flows through the Foundation School Program and out to school districts. As has been the case in the past, the TEA document includes a statement about reductions in the anticipated level of state spending based on the reliance on an assumed increase in local property tax collections. For the upcoming biennium, the agency is assuming the state will supplant $1.5 billion in state revenue by relying on these local dollars. ATPE released the following press statement in response.


The House Public Education Committee released its preliminary report on school safety this week. The report follows the release of similar interim documents by a Senate committee and Gov. Greg Abbott, but the House report is unique in its focus on directing state funding to accomplish a number of goals aimed at preventing future tragedies like the school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas.

The report is the result of several interim hearings held over the summer at the direction of Texas House Speaker Joe Straus and committee chairman  Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood). Read a summary of the report’s findings and take a look at the full report itself in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) is scheduled to meet Tuesday through Friday of next week, and the agenda includes a formal look at its Long-Range Plan for Public Education.

The plan is the result of more than a year of meetings and stakeholder input, which includes in-person conferences and an online survey seeking guidance from educators and community members all over the state. The final product includes recommendations related to attracting and retaining educators and lifting up the education profession. Follow ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins on Twitter (@MarkWigginsTX) for updates on the plan, which will be discussed on Tuesday.

 

From The Texas Tribune: Republican Pete Flores, Democrat Pete Gallego set for runoff for Uresti seat

By Patrick Svitek, The Texas Tribune
July 31, 2018

Former U.S. Rep. Pete Gallegos (left), a Democrat, and Republican Peter Flores are running for state Senate District 19. Photo by Bob Daemmrich: Gallego/Campaign website

Republican Pete Flores, Democrat Pete Gallego set for runoff for Uresti seat” was first published by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Republican Pete Flores and Democrat Pete Gallego are headed to a runoff in the special election to replace convicted former state Sen. Carlos Uresti, D-San Antonio.

With all precincts reporting Tuesday night, Flores led Gallego by 5 percentage points, 34 percent to 29 percent, according to unofficial returns. At 24 percent, state Rep. Roland Gutierrez of San Antonio came in third in the eight-way race, and he conceded in a statement. The five other candidates were in single digits, including Uresti’s brother, outgoing state Rep. Tomas Uresti of San Antonio.

The first-place finish by Flores, who unsuccessfully challenged Carlos Uresti in 2016, is a boon to Republicans in the Democratic-leaning district. In the home stretch of the race, Flores benefited from a raft of endorsements from Texas’ top elected officials including Gov. Greg Abbott, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, and U.S. Sens. John Cornyn and Ted Cruz.

Their heft will continue to be tested in a district considered friendly to Democrats, if not solidly in their column. After taking congratulatory calls from Abbott and Patrick, Flores issued a statement insisting a second-round victory was within reach.

“I know we can win this runoff,” Flores said. “We will win this runoff. The real work begins tomorrow.”

Rallying supporters in San Antonio, Gallego promised his campaign would not get outworked in the yet-to-be-scheduled overtime round. “I know, in the final analysis, we win,” he said.

The special election was triggered in June, when Carlos Uresti resigned after being found guilty of 11 felonies, including securities fraud and money laundering, tied to his work with a now-defunct oilfield services company. He was sentenced to 12 years in prison days after he stepped down.

Much of the action in the race centered on Gutierrez and Gallego, a former congressman and longtime state House member from West Texas. Gutierrez went after Gallego over questions about whether he lives in the district, among other things, while Gallego highlighted Gutierrez’s history of tax problems.

Flores, a former Texas game warden, was the best-known of three Republicans on the ballot Tuesday. He received 40 percent of the vote against Carlos Uresti two years ago in SD-19, which encompasses a 17-county area that starts on San Antonio’s East Side and sprawls hundreds of miles west.

This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2018/07/31/sd-19-special-election-results/.

 

Texas Tribune mission statement

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Great night for public education in primary runoffs

The votes are in – and pro-public education candidates had a great night across Texas!

Many Texas educators spent the past two months wearing red, volunteering, making phone calls, working the polls, and investing their own personal resources helping these campaigns. Their hard work paid off in spades Tuesday night. In the final tally, 80% of the runoff candidates backed by ATPE-PAC or ATPE Direct won their elections by a whopping average of 22.5 percentage points. Conversely, candidates who were financed by anti-public education pressure groups lost all but a single race.

Statewide turnout figures for the Republican runoffs isn’t available, and statewide turnout in the Democratic runoff was just 2.8 percent. This means that every vote was immensely important, and educators who performed their civic duty by voting in the runoffs likely made the key difference in many of these races.

Retiring Speaker Joe Straus (R-San Antonio), who championed public education legislation in the Texas House, was also active in backing candidates who vowed to stand up for public schools. As the numbers pointed to victory for public education Tuesday night, Speaker Straus issued a statement congratulating the candidates who won their runoffs.

“Once again, Republican primary voters have shown overwhelming support for responsible candidates who will put their communities first and take a serious approach to the state’s challenges,” said Straus. “The results in these runoffs and in the March primaries clearly demonstrate that Republican voters want constructive and pragmatic leadership for our fast-growing state.”

The results from runoff in elections in the Texas House are as follows:

House District 4 (R)
Keith Bell: 59%
Stuart Spitzer: 41%

House District 8 (R)
Cody Harris: 57%
Thomas McNutt: 43%

House District 13 (R)
Ben Leman: 57%
Jill Wolfskill: 43%

House District 37 (D)
Alex Dominguez: 57%
Rep. Rene Oliveira: 43%

House District 45 (D)
Erin Zwiener: 51%
Rebecca Bell-Metereau: 49%

House District 46 (D)
Sheryl Cole: 51%
Jose “Chito” Vela: 49%

House District 47 (D)
Vikki Goodwin: 58%
Elaina Fowler: 42%

House District 54 (R)
Brad Buckley: 58%
Rep. Scott Cosper: 42%

House District 62 (R)
Reggie Smith: 71%
Brent Lawson: 29%

House District 64 (D)
Andrew Morris: 54%
Mat Pruneda: 46%

House District 107 (R)
Deanna Maria Metzger: 56%
Joe Ruzicka: 44%

House District 109 (D)
Carl Sherman: 64%
Deshaundra Lockhart Jones: 36%

House District 121 (R)
Steve Allison: 58%
Matt Beebe: 42%

House District 133 (D)
Marty Schexnayder: 56%
Sandra G. Moore: 44%

Elsewhere, Rita Lucido defeated Fran Watson by 16 percentage points to become the Democratic nominee and challenge state Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston) in Senate District 17. Former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez defeated Mark White, a Houston businessman and the son of the late former Gov. Mark White, in the Democratic gubernatorial primary.

Thank you to everyone who volunteered, contributed, and showed up to vote in these important elections! Educators have gone to great lengths this election season to promote a culture of voting in school districts across Texas, and the work has only just begun. Campaigns will now turn toward the November 6 General Election, when Texas voters will make their final decisions as to who will represent them at the state and federal levels.

Educators: Your runoff vote could be your most impactful!

Early voting is currently underway in the 2018 Runoff Elections, with Election Day set for May 22. Believe it or not, this is your chance to have the biggest impact on any race this year!

Wait, how’s that possible?

First, understand that Texas voter turnout is unfortunately pretty abysmal. Even in big election years like the 2016 Presidential Election, only 59 percent of registered voters in Texas came out to cast their ballot. That’s barely more than half! In effect, the half that voted made the decision for the half who could have voted, but chose to stay home.

When there’s no race for president, the numbers look even worse – especially when it comes to primaries. Just 10 percent of registered voters participated in the 2018 Republican Primary, while seven percent participated in the Democratic Primary. As of Tuesday, turnout for early voting in the 2018 Runoff Elections among the state’s most populous counties was just 1.7 percent of registered voters.

Imagine – that 1.7 percent will end up deciding races that will affect all 28 million people living in Texas. According to the math, each of those voters effectively spoke for 139 people. All that is to say that if you want your single vote to have an impact, now is the time to cast it!

So why is that vote important? There are plenty of reasons.

With Speaker Joe Straus (R-San Antonio) retiring, the first order of business when the next legislature convenes in January 2019 will be to elect a new speaker. Will members choose a leader who, like Straus, works to increase public education funding and defend kids and classrooms against harmful legislation proposed by the lieutenant governor? Or will they choose someone who will lower the gates to vouchers bills and declare open season on educators? The runoffs will certainly make an impact on that vote.

How much so? According to election news website txelects.com, organizations devoted to defunding and privatizing public schools have spent more than a million dollars fighting public education allies in runoff races. These groups accounted for more than a third of the $3.3 million total raised by all candidates in the Republican runoffs. Would you spend a million dollars if you didn’t think you’d get something in return?

Now you see why it’s more important than ever that you vote in the runoff elections underway now. If you voted in the 2018 Primary Elections, then you’re eligible to vote in the runoff for whatever party you voted with back in March. If you didn’t vote in the March primaries, that’s okay! You can vote in whichever party’s runoff election you like!

To find out more about who’s on the ballot in your area, click on the CANDIDATES page here at TeachTheVote.org. Now get out there and use your teacher voice!

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: May 11, 2018

From Austin to the nation’s capital, here’s a look at how ATPE’s lobby team has been working hard for you this week:


Early voting starts Monday for Texas’s Republican and Democratic primary runoffs on May 22. This week ATPE continued to highlight races across the state where education has pushed to the forefront of political discourse heading into the runoffs. We encourage you to learn more about the races in your district by visiting the candidates section of TeachtheVote.org and by checking out our runoff spotlights for candidates in House Districts 4, 8, 54, 62, and 121.

Remember, if you voted in a party primary back in March, you may only vote in the same party’s runoff election this month. If you are registered but did not vote at all in March, you may choose to vote in either party’s runoff election. You can find more information on eligibility to participate in the runoffs and what you need to do here.

Early voting for the runoffs is May 14-18, 2018, and runoff election day is May 22,2018.

 


ATPE’s lobby team has been working to prevent a controversial private school voucher amendment from being added to a national defense bill that is on the move. The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services met this week to consider the National Defense Authorization Act. Our Austin- and Washington-based lobbyists have watched the development of this bill closely since learning that discussions of adding a voucher were underway in the House. As ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann reports today, the potential voucher, in the form of an Education Savings Account (ESA), would funnel existing federal Impact Aid dollars to military families without accountability for how those funds are spent. While the ESA didn’t make it into the bill during committee, it now heads to the floor of the House for debate. There, it could still be added through the amendment process.

ATPE sent a letter this week to Chairman Pete Sessions (R-TX), who leads the committee that determines which amendments will be considered on the House floor, asking him not to allow the voucher amendment. The letter highlights that we join the Military Coalition, a group of 25 organizations representing more than 5.5 million active and former members of the U.S. Military, in opposing the voucher. “The $2,500 voucher program created by HR 5199,” ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell Canaday wrote, “would drain limited dollars from both the public school system in Texas as well the Federal Impact Aid Program, hurting the very military-connected students it purports to help.” Read the full letter here and check back for developments on this issue.

 


An article by the Texas Tribune this week explored how charter schools operate in a precarious gray space that makes them a government entity at some times and a private entity at others. ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter is quoted in the full-length article by Emma Platoff, which is republished here on Teach the Vote.

 


In an effort to encourage parents, teachers, and school leaders to actively participate in the rulemaking process, TEA sent a letter to school administrators on Wednesday requesting that school districts and open-enrollment charter schools post upcoming rulemaking actions on their websites. Learn more about the request and ATPE’s involvement in rulemaking changes in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

 


 

House Pensions Committee meeting May 10, 2018, in Dallas.

The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) of Texas was one of the many items discussed at Thursday’s meeting of the House Committee on Pensions held in Dallas, TX. The meeting, which focused on the committee’s interim charges, featured testimony from TRS Executive Director Brian Guthrie plus a number of active and retired educators. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins attended the hearing and provided full details in his blog post here.

 


Runoff Spotlight – Get to know the candidates in House District 121

With an important primary runoff election just around the corner on May 18, ATPE is shining a spotlight on some of the high-profile races that will be decided that day. This post in our runoff spotlight series for the Teach the Vote blog looks at the candidates running in the Republican primary runoff for House District (HD) 121. The person elected to fill this seat will join colleagues in the 86th Texas Legislature in January to begin debating such pivotal issues as school finance, teacher pay, healthcare benefits, student discipline, graduation requirements, and more. Learn about the candidates’ views on public education by checking out their full profiles on Teach the Vote; click on a candidate’s name below to read more. Don’t forget to remind any friends and family who live in this legislative district and are eligible to get out and vote!

The Candidates: Steve Allison (R) vs. Matt Beebe (R)

Texas House District (HD) 121 encapsulates Alamo Heights and some of the Hollywood Park portions of San Antonio. The district is currently represented by Speaker of the House Joe Straus (R), who announced last fall that he would be retiring at the end of his current term.

Candidate Steve Allison is a business attorney with a practice that focuses on businesses, religious organizations, and doctors. He was a 12-year member and three-term president of the Alamo Heights School Board. In his response to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, he stated that his top priorities for public education would be to reassess the school funding structure, strengthen teacher compensation and benefits, and partner with business and industry to address the challenges facing public schools. Allison has been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC, by the editorial board of the San Antonio Express-News, and by outgoing Speaker Straus.

Candidate Matt Beebe owns and operates a cybersecurity business alongside his wife. While he declined to respond to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, he has been endorsed by the Texas Home School Coalition PAC, which supports using public funds for private and home-schools and by Texans for Fiscal Responsibility (Empower Texans), a group that supports budget cuts and limiting state spending on public education.

For additional information on this race or the primary runoff elections in general, contact ATPE Governmental Relations at government@atpe.org.

Runoff Spotlight – Get to know the candidates in House District 62

This post is the latest in ATPE’s blog series for Teach the Vote where we are highlighting some of the high-profile primary races that will be decided by a runoff election on May 22. We’re only a few months away from the start of the 2019 legislative session, where lawmakers will be making such crucial decisions as how to fund our schools, achieve and measure student progress, and provide for competitive educator pay and benefits. The 2018 elections will determine who gets to make those decisions and more, making it extremely important for all eligible educators to exercise their right to vote. Learn more about candidates running in the Republican primary runoff for House District (HD) 62 in today’s spotlight blog post. To read even more about the candidates’ views on public education, check out their full profiles on Teach the Vote by clicking on either candidate’s name below.

The Candidates: Brent Lawson (R) vs. Reggie Smith (R)

Texas House District (HD) 62 covers a section of Northeast Texas that includes Sherman, Bonham, and part of Collinsville. The district was previously represented by Rep. Larry Phillips (R-Sherman) who resigned in April.

Candidate Reggie Smith is an attorney who resides in Van Alstyne with his family. In his response to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, he stated that his top priorities for public education would be to reform the school finance system, reduce reliance on local property taxes for school funding, reduce standardized testing, and empower parents and teachers. Smith has been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC .

Candidate Brent Lawson is an electrician engineer who resides with his wife in Grayson County. Lawson declined to respond to the 2018 ATPE Candidate Survey, however he is endorsed by the Texas Home School Coalition PAC, which supports using public funds for private and home-schools and by Texans for Fiscal Responsibility (Empower Texans), a group that supports budget cuts and limiting state spending on public education.

For additional information on this race or the primary runoff elections in general, contact ATPE Government Relations at government@atpe.org.