Tag Archives: rules

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Feb. 7, 2020

Check out what happened this week in education news from Texas and the nation’s capital, courtesy of the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


ELECTION UPDATE: Voting in the Texas primary elections will begin in less than two weeks. Early voting starts February 18, 2020, which is also Educator Voting Day, and ends February 28. Our state’s primary elections on “Super Tuesday” will be March 3, 2020.

This week on our blog, ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter shared information about education-related recommendations in the ballot propositions being put to voters by the Texas Republican and Democratic Parties in this primary election. The ballot propositions help each political party fine-tune its platform based on views expressed by voters in the primary election on various issues. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins looked at some of the latest campaign fundraising news, takeaways from the Iowa caucuses earlier this week, and more in his election roundup blog post from yesterday.

With the primary elections inching closer, ATPE is focusing on helping educators find resources that will help them learn more about the candidates vying for their votes. Read up on the people running for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education in 2020 by viewing their candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote. The profiles include candidates’ responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey, legislators’ voting records, campaign contact information, and additional information. ATPE does not endorse candidates and invites all candidates to participate in our survey project and share information for their profiles that appear on Teach the Vote. Watch this new instructional video to learn the different ways you can search for candidate information using Teach the Vote.

For additional resources to help you prepare for early voting, visit TexasEducatorsVote.com, or attend one of the “For the Future” education-themed candidate forums being hosted by the Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation. Click here for details on the events.


FEDERAL UPDATE: President Donald Trump delivered his State of the Union (SOTU) address on Tuesday, the third of his presidency. In the speech, as ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins reports for Teach the Vote, the president expressed his opposition to public schools and called on Congress to pass a school voucher bill proposed by U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas). The bill in question, S. 634, proposes to divert taxpayer dollars that may otherwise go to public education away from local schools and use those tax dollars to subsidize private and for-profit programs. The president cast public schools disparagingly as “failing government schools.” It’s worth noting the Texas Constitution guarantees a right to a free public education as being key to a healthy democratic society, and our state has a long history of independent school districts run by the communities they serve. ATPE’s Wiggins spoke to the Houston Chronicle and previewed the president’s remarks on Tuesday in this blog post.


Last year’s House Bill (HB) 3 included a Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA) intended to provide additional funding to school districts that create an incentive pay system for teachers. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins reports that districts interested in creating a TIA program were asked to submit letters of intent to the Texas Education Agency (TEA) by January 24 of this year. Anecdotal reports indicate that more than 700 of the state’s over 1,000 school districts have responded to date. TEA is implementing this initiative with a series of presentations to stakeholders around the state, and the agency is expected to publish rules in March 2020.

ATPE successfully lobbied the 86th Legislature to ensure that districts would not be required to use the STAAR test to measure teacher performance as part of a TIA program, but questions remain over the degree to which these programs may rely on student test scores. We will be paying close attention during the rulemaking process to see how these programs are allowed to be structured in order to qualify for the additional state funding. You can read more about TIA programs from TEA here.


Members of the ATPE Governmental Relations team gave a presentation on advocacy at this week’s Texas Computer Education Association (TCEA) Convention and Exposition in Austin. Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell, Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, Lobbyist Mark Wiggins, and Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier spoke to attendees about the implementation of major bills passed in 2019, what’s at stake in the 2020 elections, and ways educators can get involved in advocacy efforts.

ATPE lobbyists Wiggins, Mitchell, Exter, and Chevalier at the TCEA Convention, Feb. 4, 2020

ATPE advocacy never stops. Get involved outside the legislative session.

When people think about public education advocacy, many naturally think about the legislature and the 140-day legislative session that occurs every two years. To be sure there is a lot of action during session, but there are also plenty of ways for public education advocates, including ATPE’s professional lobby team and members of the general public who care about the issue, to stay engaged outside of a legislative session.

Two primary areas of engagement during the interim are interacting with state regulatory boards and agencies and following interim charges to legislative committees.

Boards and agencies, such as the State Board of Education or the Teacher Retirement System, do the day-to-day work of implementing the laws enacted by the state legislature. This work happens year-round and these entities have a huge impact on shaping the law through their interpretation and implementation of it. Stakeholders can share their input with boards and agencies through administrative rulemaking processes and at public meetings.

State board and agency rules are contained in the Texas Administrative Code. Each week, proposed and newly adopted rules are published in the Texas Register through the Secretary of State’s office. Both resources are available to the public.

For example, just this week ATPE submitted comments on multiple administrative rules.

  • ATPE formally commented on proposed changes to commissioner’s rules governing school district-charter partnerships under Senate Bill 1882 of 2017.
  • We joined with the Texas Association of Future Educators in recommending rule revisions by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) that could benefit high school students who are interested in careers in the classroom.
  • ATPE also shared concerns about SBEC rules relating to master teacher certificates that are slated to be eliminated as a result of 2019’s House Bill 3 (2019).

In addition, we attended this week’s State Board of Education meetings, as ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins has reported on here and here for Teach the Vote. These are examples of advocacy efforts that, while related to actions taken by the legislature, take place in entirely different arenas. Rulemaking happens at the federal level, too. Through our Washington, DC-based lobby team, we are able similarly to stay on top of federal regulatory actions that might affect ATPE members.

Legislative committees have also begun conducting interim hearings that will continue to ramp up over the summer. These hearings give lawmakers an opportunity to monitor the implementation of recent legislation and to discuss the House interim charges and Senate interim charges. Public testimony is often allowed at these meetings, and committees may also invite expert witnesses to sit on panels or speak about an issue. Interim charges, and the hearings at which they are discussed, often provide the basis for major legislation in the upcoming legislative session. Becoming involved in the shaping of bills before they are ever filed puts savvy advocates way ahead of the game.

ATPE will engage in these and many other advocacy opportunities throughout the interim on behalf of our 100,000 members, and we encourage educators and others who care about public education to do the same. Take the time to share your input with decision-makers during this important, sometimes overlooked advocacy period. ATPE advocacy never stops!

Recap of the Dec. 2019 SBEC meeting

Certification board discusses educational aide certificates, teacher and principal survey data, and more at the fifth and final SBEC meeting of 2019.

Last Friday, Dec. 6, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met for the last time this year. The board discussed several agenda items, including reader teacher certifications, allowing high school students to obtain the educational aide certificate, an update on various educator certification statistics, and the latest on the EdTPA and T-TESS pilots. The board also elected a new Chairperson, Dr. Arturo Cavazos (Superintendent of Harlingen CISD), Vice-Chairperson, Rohanna Brooks-Sykes, a counselor in Klein ISD, and Secretary, Jose Rodriguez, an elementary school teacher in Leander ISD.

Master Reading Teachers

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified before SBEC on Dec. 6, 2019

The board is undertaking a standard, four-year rule review of 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 239, Student Services Certificates. These rules pertain to the school counselor, school librarian, educational diagnostician, and reading specialist certificates. Under House Bill (HB) 3 of the 86th Legislature, the Master Reading Teacher (MRT) certification was repealed and replaced with a “Legacy Master Teacher” designation. For affected teachers, the Legacy designation will disappear when their existing Master Teacher certificate expires, leaving some teachers unable to maintain their current teaching assignments.

ATPE is urging SBEC to honor the work that MRT certificate holders have accomplished by allowing them to transition over to the Reading Specialist certificate, which has identical teaching assignments. ATPE previously submitted written testimony to the board on this topic at its October SBEC meeting. At Friday’s meeting, ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier again provided written and oral testimony (watch archived video here at the 41:00 mark) in support of MRTs who may be negatively affected by this aspect of HB 3 and the elimination of their certificate.

Potential changes to the language in these SBEC rules will be acted upon at a future meeting. The board will accept public comments on this topic from Jan. 3 to Feb. 3, 2020, through the Texas Register. Additionally, interested educators can testify or submit written comments to the board at its next meeting on Feb. 21, 2020. (Witnesses must submit comments or register to testify at least 48 hours before the meeting.)

Other action items on the agenda:

The board voted to amend disciplinary rules contained in 19 TAC Chapter 249, implementing several educator misconduct bills passed during the 2019 legislative session, including Senate Bill (SB) 1230, SB 1476, and HB 3, as well as SB 37, which eliminates student loan default as a ground for SBEC discipline. This agenda item originally included proposed rule changes to allow SBEC to deny certification to someone who had abandoned a contract within the preceding 12 months. The proposed amendment sought to address intern and probationary certificate holders who abandon their contracts before SBEC can take disciplinary action against them, since their certificates are only valid for one year. The board voted to postpone discussing the contract abandonment language until after a planned stakeholder meeting in January, which ATPE will attend.

The board also adopted the required four-year rule review for two more sets of SBEC rules: 9 TAC Chapter 232, General Certification Provisions, which regulates certificate renewal, continuing education, and criminal history records; and 19 TAC Chapter 230, Professional Educator Preparation and Certification, which deals with procedures for issuing certificates and permits, testing requirements and fees, and the types and classes of certificates issued by the board.

In a separate agenda item, the board amended 19 TAC Chapter 230 to implement SB 1839, HB 2039, and HB 3349 (85th Legislature), plus HB 3 (86th Legislature). The changes include reducing  the time for certification test retakes from 45 to 30 days, and requiring candidates to take the English as a Second Language Supplemental assessment for issuance of an intern certificate obtained through the intensive pre-service route. ATPE is pleased with a change in this chapter to allow the Educational Aide I certificate to be issued to high school students who have completed certain courses within the Education and Training career and technical education cluster. Other changes include the addition of the Early Childhood: Prekindergarten-Grade 3 certificate to the list of certificates that cannot be obtained via certification by exam.

The board also took several actions relating to EPPs, including the approval of the accreditation statuses of 10 programs. Additionally, the board approved a request by East Texas Baptist University to offer the School Counselor class of certificate. Two programs, South Texas Transition to Teaching Alternative Certification (STTT) Preparation Program and Teaching via E-Learning (TEACH) Alternative Certification, were approved to continue to operate with conditions following SBEC orders to improve their programs due to inadequate performance. The board also approved the continuing approval review and lifted the board orders from August 2015 for TeacherBuilder.com Alternative Certification Educator Preparation Program.

Discussion only agenda items (no action taken):

The board discussed several possible future revisions to 19 TAC Chapter 228, which covers requirements for EPPs. The revisions would simplify a table of requirements in the chapter; implement portions of HB 18 of the 86th Legislature; authorize teaching sites outside of Texas under certain situations such as military assignment; provide admittance policy guidance to EPPs that are closing or consolidating; restrict a summer-only practicum unless it is part of a year-round school or extended year program; add language for a dismissal policy for candidates who violate the code of ethics; provide concise reasons that an EPP would no longer support a candidate in an internship; and clarify the number (three) and spacing of the formal observations conducted during a practicum.

Later in the afternoon, the board discussed possible amendments to 19 TAC Chapter 235 on certificate standards, including a TEA-recommended split certification for special education, with separate certificates for EC-5 and 6-12. TEA staff also presented information on two supplemental certificate sets of standards: one for bilingual Spanish, grades EC-12 that focuses on bilingualism, biliteracy, and biculturalism; and another for “DeafBlind” grades EC-12. The proposals reflect input from stakeholders in the bilingual and special education communities and from an April 2019 SBEC work group meeting.

TEA also updated the board on the EdTPA performance assessment pilot, which is almost halfway through its first year. In November, 34 candidates submitted their portfolios. Thirty-two applications have been submitted for the second year of the pilot, including 15 from alternative certification programs. Dr. Stacey Edmonson, Dean of the College of Education at Sam Houston State University, is directing an alternative pilot to the EdTPA pilot that is based on the T-TESS. The pilot attempts to use the T-TESS as a performance assessment tool.

Finally, the board discussed proposed revisions to 19 TAC Chapter 232 on general certification provisions and professional development, which would implement several bills passed by the 86th Legislature. These include continuing professional education instruction regarding mental health and substance abuse training (HB 18 and SB 11); training requirements for superintendents regarding sexual abuse and human trafficking (HB 403); and the removal of student loan default as grounds to deny the renewal of a certificate (SB 37). The chapter would also be simplified and reorganized as suggested by ATPE and other stakeholders.

Facts and figures:

Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff updated the board on Texas educator certification statistics from fiscal year (FY) 2018 (September 1, 2017 to August 31, 2018) to FY 2019 (September 1, 2018 to August 31, 2019). Of note, the number of standard certificates issued increased from 67,748 to 85,708. Nearly half (49%) of all initial teacher certificates issued are through alternative certification programs. The percentage of EPPs accredited as warned or on probation greatly increased, from 5.1% to 27.6% and 5.1% to 13.4%, respectively. This increase is due to additional ASEP standards becoming operational. As for educator leadership and quality, most legal cases opened were due to contract abandonment, the number of which increased by 124% from 111 up to 249 in FY 19.

TEA staff also updated the board on the results of the 2018-19 principal survey of first-year teachers and new teacher survey, which are part of the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP). The survey results show that principals find their first-year teachers from alternative certification programs to be the least prepared. Similarly, new teachers from alternative certification programs indicated they felt the least prepared. Forty-nine percent of new teachers in 2019 were prepared in alternative certification programs, compared to 32 percent from traditional, undergraduate programs.

Additionally, TEA updated the board at its request on educator testing data. The data show that pass rates even into the third test attempt can be quite low. A representative from an EPP suggested that programs be given more time to remediate candidates who cannot pass tests.

Future meetings:

Mark your calendars! The approved SBEC meeting dates for 2020 are:

  • Feb. 21, 2020
  • May 1, 2020
  • July 24, 2020
  • Oct. 9, 2020
  • Dec. 11, 2020

SBEC considers EdTPA pilot, special education certification, and more

SBEC meeting, April 26, 2019

On Friday, April 26, 2019, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met in Austin to take up an agenda including several important items. Items considered by the board included final approval of the EdTPA pilot, discussion of a new framework for special education certification exams, and approval of final details for the new “Principal as Instructional Leader” certificate.

Some action items on the board’s agenda last week will result in a public comment period that will run from May 31, 2019, through July 1, 2019. These include proposals to prompt a routine four-year review of rules regarding the certification of appraisers and rules establishing the certificate categories within the certificate class for classroom teachers (e.g. Science 4-8, Social Studies 7-12, Music EC-12). The board is also proposing changes to rules regarding how districts are required to make personnel assignment decisions. For instance, if you have a certificate in Ethnic Studies: Mexican American Studies 9-12, you are allowed to teach a variety of social studies and history courses. Due to public testimony, three changes were made to the proposed rules following the February meeting: allowing with agriculture certificates to teach Principles of Architecture: Principals of Construction, Grades 9-12;  allowing those with Physics/Math certificates to teach Robotics 1, Grades 9-12; and allowing those with technology education certificates to teach Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics, Grades 9-12.

Another major rule-making item on the SBEC agenda that will require a public comment period was the approval of proposed changes to rules on Teacher Certification Redesign, including certification requirements, testing requirements, and types of certificate classes and permits issued (probationary, intern, etc.). The proposed changes include the following:

  • A maximum 45-day waiting period between test attempts, which supports test reliability.
  • The option of a four-week, intensive pre-service pathway towards an intern certificate, which is meant to incentivize alternative certification and post-baccalaureate programs to have pre-service teaching.
  • The use of EdTPA, a portfolio-based performance assessment, as a testing option that educator preparation programs (EPPs) can opt into using during a two-year implementation pilot.
  • Updates to fees, including a shift to subject-matter-only assessments for EPPs that require pre-admission content tests (PACT), which would cost $106 (proposed effective January 1, 2020). EdTPA would cost $281 and only affect candidates who choose to use EdTPA and participate in an EPP that is in the pilot, with a cost of $111/task for retakes (three tasks total).

Testimony on the EdTPA proposal was voluminous during Friday’s meeting. An overwhelming majority of EPPs (university, alternative, and post-baccalaureate) testified in opposition to the proposed new assessment, citing concerns with test integrity, cost to candidates, and pilot design. Those in favor of the change, including Teach Plus Texas and four Teach Plus Texas policy fellows, stated that authentic assessment will be effective at inciting change in EPPs that will lead to better prepared teachers. While the board voted in favor of beginning the pilot, certain board members such as Dr. Art Cavazos, Dr. Rex Peebles, Dr. John Kelly, Carlos Villagrana, and Tommy Coleman expressed concerns with the structure and viability of data obtained from the pilot. Dr. Cavazos strongly advocated for a simultaneous alternative to EdTPA to be developed, so that additional data and options are available after the two-year pilot concludes, should the EdTPA data turn out to be inconclusive or negative. Again,a  public comment period on these proposed changes to the certification exam rules will run from May 31, 2019, through July 1, 2019, and will be published in the Texas Register.

Here are additional agenda items on which SBEC took action last Friday:

  • Final approval of the review of rules regarding educator disciplinary proceedings, sanctions, and contested cases. This is a standard four-year review that all state agency rules are subject to on an ongoing, cyclical basis.
  • Final approval of a new rule specifying certification standards for the English as a Second Language (ESL) Supplemental Certificate (proposed effective July 21, 2019). One of the changes to the standards is a section on culturally responsive teaching in order to construct mutually adaptive learning environments for English language learners.
  • Final approval of the deadline for candidates to qualify and apply for the current Principal Certificate (August 31, 2019) so that all certificates under this category can be issued by October 30, 2019. SBEC also heard an update on the 59 EPPs that have been approved to offer the new Principal as Instructional Leader Certificate. See more about Principal Certification Redesign here.
  • Approval of the membership of the Bilingual Education certificate advisory committee, which will work with TEA staff to draft educator standards that define the content of EPPs and certification exams. The committee will convene in June 2019.
  • Approval of the rest of the EPP accountability ratings (56), as most others (77) had been approved during the February SBEC meeting.
  • Approval/action on disciplinary cases involving educator misconduct.

The following additional items were on the board’s agenda last week for discussion only:

  • Discussion of changes to rules regarding accountability standards and procedures for EPPs, including new commendations for high-performing EPPs, adoption of the accountability manual, and how accreditation statuses are determined.
  • Discussion of proposed changes to admission requirements into EPPs to reflect changes to the PACT, which is a part of the Teacher Certification Redesign mentioned above. The purpose of the PACT is to allow candidates admittance to EPP programs by demonstrating subject-matter-only knowledge (if they don’t have the commensurate coursework and minimum 2.5 GPA). Currently, candidates can gain admission through a content pedagogy test, which tests for teaching strategies that the candidate hasn’t been exposed to yet. The proposed revisions would also implement SB 1839, HB 2039, HB 3349 of the 85th Legislature, which created an Early Childhood through Grade 3 (EC-3) certificate and a Trade and Industrial Workforce Training: Grades 6-12 certificate.
  • Discussion of recommendations made by the Special Education policy forums and an update on the upcoming certification test development process. This includes four new special education certifications and a Deaf/Blind supplemental certification. The four new certification tests would be a “Mild/Moderate Support, Grades EC-8”, “Mild/Moderate Support, Grades 6-12”, “High Support, Grades EC-8”, and “High Support, Grades 6-12”.
  • Discussion of the 5-year EPP continuing approval review process and the current results for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 reviews. This item will come up again at the October 2019 meeting as an action item.

SBEC will hold a work session on July 25, 2019 and will hold its next formal meeting on July 26, 2019. There will be an opportunity for public testimony at the July 26 meeting for items that will result in a public comment period (see above) and for the discussion items above. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates.

House Public Education Committee kicks off its session work

House Committee on Public Education, 86th Texas Legislature

This week, the Texas House Public Education Committee met for the first time this session. State representatives serving on the committee this session are as follows:

Chairman Huberty, who is returning for his third session as chair of the committee, opened the first hearing by welcoming new and returning members and emphasizing the non-/bi-partisan nature of the committee’s work. He shared a story about the glass apple he keeps in front of him on the dais during each hearing. The apple was given to him by a supporter, friend, recently retired teacher, and long-time ATPE member, Gayle Sampley.

After the chairman’s opening remarks, the committee heard a series of presentations from various high-level staff at the Texas Education Agency (TEA) meant to update the committee on a range of education issues. Links to the individual presentations can be found below:

It is worth noting that during Franklin’s presentation on educator certification, the chair questioned whether the State Board of Education (SBOE) should continue to have oversight and veto authority over rulemaking by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). Under state law, the elected SBOE has the ability to review and reject rules that have been adopted by SBEC board, whose members are appointed by the governor. The SBOE cannot change SBEC rules, however, and any veto of an SBEC rule, which is extremely rare, essentially requires the certification board to start its rulemaking process over to correct perceived flaws in the rule. ATPE has supported and often relied on SBOE’s oversight of SBEC rules to help prevent the enactment of policies that would be detrimental to teachers or overall teacher quality,.

During the hearing, Chairman Huberty also laid out the committee’s schedule for the next two weeks. First, the committee will meet twice next week on Feb. 5 and 6 to hear from selected members of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance regarding the current condition of Texas’s school finance system and the commission’s recommendations for changes to tit. During the following week, on Feb. 11 and 12, the committee plans to hear invited testimony from a broad range of experts and stakeholders who have comments and concerns with the commission’s plan, or who may want to offer solutions of their own for the committee to consider as it begins its work moving forward a bill to overhaul the state’s school finance system.

SBOE welcomes new members at first meeting of 2019

The State Board of Education (SBOE) welcomed newly-elected members Monday, marking the board’s first meeting of 2019. Senate Education Committee Chair Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood) administered the oath of office to recently reelected members and newly-elected Members Pam Little (R-Fairview), Matt Robinson (R-Friendswood), and Aicha Davis (D-Dallas).

Legislators and SBOE members gathered for oath of office ceremony, January 28, 2019.

Members then adopted the board’s operating rules. Among the changes, audience members will not be allowed to carry flags or noisemakers into the gallery area. This stems from an incident in 2018 in which a disruptive member of the audience brought a confederate flag into the gallery. Visual aids will still be permitted in the hallways and atrium outside the gallery.

The board engaged in a lengthy discussion of its authority with regard to charter schools, in particular when it comes to charter revisions or amendments. The board has the authority to veto new charter applications, but not necessarily when it comes to revisions or amendments. Some members expressed a desire to increase the transparency of amendment applications, but Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff suggested amendments are under the sole purview of the commissioner of education.

Members elected Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo) as vice-chair of the board and Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) as secretary. Members then assigned committees, which will each elect their own chair when they meet on Thursday. On the Permanent School Fund/School Finance Committee are Pat Hardy, Ken Mercer, Lawrence Allen, Donna Bahorich, and Tom Maynard. On the Instruction Committee are Sue Melton-Malone, Georgina Perez, Pam Little, Aicha Davis, and Marty Rowley. On the School Initiatives Committee are Barbara Cargill, Keven Ellis, Marisa Perez-Diaz, Matt Robinson, and Ruben Cortez.

 

TEA encourages education stakeholders to share rulemaking input

In a letter addressed to school administrators Tuesday, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) requested that school districts and open-enrollment charter schools include upcoming rulemaking actions on their websites in order to encourage school leaders, parents, and teachers to participate in the rulemaking process. The agency is asking districts and charters to post links to the TEA’s web pages that host proposed rules of the Commissioner of Education, the State Board of Education (SBOE), and the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC).

Along with legislative action at the Texas Capitol, administrative rulemaking is one of the two main ways education policy is made. However, unlike the Texas Legislature, which is only active for 140 days every two years, state administrative bodies make rules year-round. When it comes to public education, the Commissioner of Education, the SBOE, and SBEC each have express rulemaking authority over a defined set of topics. While very different from the legislative process, the rulemaking process also makes use of public input. To increase public accessibility, the TEA has implemented new electronic forms to provide public comment on proposed rules, which can be found by clicking on the corresponding links above. The agency has also created a frequently-asked questions (FAQ) page about the rulemaking process.

ATPE’s lobby team regularly participates in the rulemaking proceses by giving written and oral input to the commissioner and state boards on issues of concern to our membership. Also, we frequently post about significant rulemaking actions here on our blog at TeachTheVote.org, and we encourage you similarly to follow rulemaking developments that affect you, your colleagues, your students, and your classrooms. Submitting feedback on these rulemaking actions is a great way to continue to have your teacher voice heard on important education policy matters throughout the year!

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 18, 2017

Here’s your post-special session edition of ATPE’s Teach the Vote weekly wrap-up:

 


ThinkstockPhotos-455285291_gavelTuesday night marked the end of the 85th Legislature’s special session, and ATPE is pleased that a number of anti-public education proposals were defeated. The legislature declined to grant Gov. Greg Abbott’s request for a private school voucher program for students with special needs, opting instead to fund state grant programs that will aid public school students with autism, dyslexia, and other challenges. Also blocked were discriminatory bills to take away educators’ access to payroll deduction for their association dues. ATPE is thankful for the educators who called and wrote to their lawmakers or visited the capitol to take a stand for educators having the same rights as other public employees and being able to continue to manage their own money as they choose.

The special session also resulted in some gains for public education through the passage of House Bill (HB) 21 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood). Although the Senate would not agree to the $1.8 billion in additional public school funding that the House approved or to tapping into the state’s rainy day fund, the final bill does add $563 million over and above the budget passed by lawmakers during the regular session. That extra money will help some districts facing the loss of Additional State Aid for Tax Reduction (ASATR) funds this year, provide assistance for charter school facilities, and significantly, inject $212 million into the TRS-Care health insurance program for retired educators. The Senate rejected any long-term structural changes to our school finance system, which were favored by the House, but they included language in HB 21 to create a school finance commission that will study the issue over the next two years.

The Senate approved its version of HB 21 by a vote of 25 to 6 late Monday night. The House voted 94 to 46 to accept the Senate’s version of HB 21 Tuesday evening, with a number of representatives expressing disappointment that the bill did not do more, and many who stated they were reluctantly voting for it in the interest of preserving some modest gains for the schools in their districts. Shortly thereafter, the House surprised many by adjourning sine die upon a motion by Chairman Huberty, one day before the expiration of the 30-day special session. The Senate similarly adjourned sine die a few hours later after declining to accept a House version of a property tax bill. In a press conference late that night, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick was quick to blame the House and its leadership, including Speaker Joe Straus, for preventing more of the governor’s special session agenda from being passed. For his part, Gov. Abbott similarly complained that the House had obstructed bills, despite the fact that legislators gave final approval to bills covering half the items on the governor’s special session call.

With the governor’s signature on the bill, the next step for HB 21 will be for the Commissioner of Education and TRS board to propose and adopt rules implementing various aspects of the law. (Read more about the TRS-Care changes being considered next week in the next section of today’s wrap-up.) We’ll keep you posted on all the rulemaking developments and let you know how you can provide input to state policymakers during that process here on Teach the Vote.

ATPE Executive Director Gary Godsey said in a press statement, “We appreciate those in the legislature who fought for additional funding and structural improvements to our school finance system. ATPE looks forward to working with lawmakers during the interim to recommend longer-term solutions that will help all Texas students excel and enable us to recruit, reward, and retain the best educators in our public schools.”

 


Drugs and MoneyThe Teacher Retirement System (TRS) Board of Trustees will be meeting next Friday, Aug. 25, to consider changes to the TRS-Care healthcare program for retired educators. As noted above, the passage of HB 21 during the special session means that TRS will have an extra $212 million this biennium to offset rising costs of TRS-Care. ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter has been attending meetings with TRS staff to learn how the additional money will be used to help retired teachers. Check out his blog post for more on the specific changes the TRS board is expected to adopt next week.

 


tea-logo-header-2On Tuesday, the Texas Education Agency announced the 2017 accountability ratings for school districts and campuses. The overwhelming majority of schools (95 percent) earned a “Met Standard” rating this year, and there were fewer campuses receiving an “Improvement Required” rating in 2017. Final 2017 ratings will be shared in December following an appeal period for schools seeking to change their ratings.

View the complete accountability ratings on the TEA website here. ATPE congratulates the students and staff of all our high-achieving public schools!

 


During the special session, ATPE's Governmental Relations staff presented House Speaker Joe Straus with an honorary resolution passed by the ATPE House of Delegates in July.

During the special session, ATPE’s Governmental Relations staff presented Texas House Speaker Joe Straus with an honorary resolution passed by the ATPE House of Delegates in July.

 

SBOE Wrap-Up: November 2016

SBOE logoFriday, Nov. 18, wrapped up a busy November meeting of the State Board of Education (SBOE), which returned to Austin to tackle a wide range of subjects before the holiday break. Here’s a brief rundown of the week’s action.

Mexican-American Studies

The board said “no thanks” to a controversial Mexican-American studies textbook that sparked protests over factual errors and complaints regarding the way Mexican-Americans are characterized in the text. After a morning dominated by demonstrations and a press conference held by opponents of the textbook, the board denied approval and asked for more submissions of ethnic studies materials. The Texas Tribune‘s Aliyya Swaby has a blow-by-blow of the drama that unfolded on Tuesday. Read more about the board’s decision and what it means for both textbook publishers and school districts teaching the elective course in this press release from the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

TEKS in the Crosshairs

Wednesday’s agenda focused primarily on updates to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (curriculum standards) for mathematics, science, English language arts, and reading. On the subject of math, board members heard exhaustive testimony regarding process standards, and whether less emphasis should be given to word problems and process questions both in the curriculum and on standardized tests. Members seemed to generally agree in a reduction in emphasis, but were concerned what the mathematics TEKS would be left with if process standards were done away with altogether.

The committee also heard reports from educator committees assigned to review the science TEKS in several areas, but most of the attention focused on biology. Reviewers recommended edits to the biology TEKS that included sections seen by some on the board as challenging the theory of evolution. In testimony, one biology teacher who sat on the review committee countered that the changes were made for streamlining purposes and preserved encouragement for instructors to engage in healthy debate of scientific theories. The Texas Tribune posted a summary of the arguments.

Bond Guarantees

On Thursday, the Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund delved into a question regarding the use of the fund to guarantee loans for new school buildings. When growing school districts want to build, for example, a new campus, they may not necessarily have the cash on hand to pay for it right away. To get things going, they can issue a bond – basically, a loan – which they can pay off, with interest, over time. Just like you, if a school district has better credit, it can get better financing and pay less interest, which can add up to millions of dollars for a big construction project. In order to get the best financing possible, public school districts with less-than-perfect credit can get the bond “guaranteed” by the $30 billion Texas Permanent School Fund (PSF). It’s a bit like your parents co-signing a loan: You get a better interest rate because they promise to pay the bank if you can’t keep up with your payments.

Dollar fanCharter schools can also take advantage of the Bond Guarantee Program, but on a limited basis. For qualifying charter holders, the amount available under the program is set by a capacity multiplier currently set at 3.25 percent. Charter holders complain the regime creates an annual rush to snap up limited resources. At Thursday’s hearing, they asked the committee to expand the multiplier to 3.5 percent, which would create several hundred million dollars in additional bond guarantees available to charters. Some on the board expressed concern over expanding the debt for which the PSF is liable to charters over which the state has less control. The board gave preliminary approval to raising the multiplier, while halting a related proposal by TEA staff to create additional academic criteria for charter holders to qualify for the program. The Austin American-Statesman‘s Julie Chang has a thorough write-up on the bond program discussion, complete with the following quote from ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter:

“The board’s first priority should always be to protect the fund so that it continues to be available to guarantee new bonding for facilities for all Texas students,” Exter said. “We agree with the commissioner on enhancing academic requirements to access the bond guarantee program. Some board members have expressed concerns about expansion by charter holders who have not utilized their current capacity. ATPE encourages those members to continue to ask those sorts of questions.”

SBEC Rules

Friday wrapped with the board taking up several rule proposals sent to them from the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). All SBEC rules must undergo final review by the SBOE board, which can vote to reject and send back proposals or take no action — which has the effect of approving the proposals. All the SBEC proposals received final approval. Learn more about those educator preparation and discipline proposals in this recent blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann.

Legislative Recommendations

The board also approved its 2017 legislative recommendations, which include a prohibition on vouchers, increased appropriations for TEA staff to adequately oversee and support the TEKS process, support for federal E-Rate support funding, an elimination of TEA’s arbitrary limit on students receiving special education services, and improved student data privacy, among others.

Farewells

This week’s SBOE meeting was the final one for two outgoing board members, Martha Dominguez (D) from SBOE District 1 and Thomas Ratliff (R) from SBOE District 9. Dominguez is an educator and current ATPE member; many of the board members referred to her as the heart or conscience of the board.

Thomas Ratliff

Thomas Ratliff

Ratliff, son of former Lt. Gov. Bill Ratliff, came onto the board eight years ago, after winning a primary election to replace the former board chair and a divisive figure in curriculum battles, Don McLeroy (R). During his tenure, Ratliff helped usher in one of the most productive and cooperative periods in the history of the SBOE.

Both of these members will be greatly missed, and ATPE thanks them for their service. After Dominguez and Ratliff decided not to run for re-election this year, their respective replacements were determined through this year’s elections to be Georgina Perez (D) and Keven Ellis (R). Perez and Ellis will begin their four-year terms in January

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Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Oct. 14, 2016

Happy Friday! Here are education news stories you might have missed this week:


Road sign toward election 2016We’re only 10 days away from the start of early voting for the 2016 general election. Many thanks to all of you who helped get pro-public education voters registered. Read more about Texas’s record-setting voter registration statistics in this recent article from The Texas Tribune, which we’ve republished here on Teach the Vote.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 8. The early voting period will run from Monday, Oct. 24, through Friday, Nov. 4. Early voting enables you to visit any polling place within your county or political subdivision. In most counties, if you wait until Election Day to vote, you’ll be required to vote in the assigned polling location for your precinct. Voters over the age of 65 or those unable to make it to the polls due to certain circumstances such as illness may apply for a ballot by mail. Learn more about the requirements for voting here. Also, click here to find out about ways the Texas Educators Vote coalition, which includes ATPE, is encouraging school leaders to help get their employees to the polls during the early voting period.

I votedNow is a great time to find out where legislative and State Board of Education candidates stand on public education issues. Use our 2016 Races page to search for your districts and read about the candidates in those races. Remember that unlike the primary elections held earlier this year where voters had to choose to vote in either the Republican or Democratic primaries, in November you can vote for any candidate in the general election regardless of party affiliation, including independent candidates.


The House Public Education Committee has scheduled an interim hearing for Monday, Oct. 17, where the main topic of discussion will be private school vouchers. ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter will be testifying at the hearing and will provide a full report for Teach the Vote next week. In the meantime, check out this video press release where Monty explains why ATPE remains committed to fighting efforts to implement a publicly funded voucher or private school scholarship program in Texas.


U.S. Dept of Education LogoThe U.S. Department of Education has released new federal rules for teacher preparation, which include requirements for states to hold educator preparation programs accountable for a number of factors. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann has been following the development of the rules over the last couple of years and provided a full report for Teach the Vote earlier this week.


Sen. John Whitmire (D-Houston) wants teachers to help students learn how to interact with law enforcement officers in the hope of decreasing violent incidents. Whitmire has announced plans to file a bill that would make lessons on police interaction part of the required curriculum for students in the ninth grade. The topic was discussed at a recent hearing of the Senate Committee on Criminal Justice, which Whitmire chairs. Read more about the idea in a recent story from KVUE News here, and check out a related interview with ATPE member Cristal Misplay, who worked as a law enforcement officer before becoming a third-grade teacher in Round Rock ISD. We want to hear your thoughts on requiring the ninth grade curriculum to include lessons on interacting with police. Post your comments below.


Rent on red business binderAustin ISD is considering ways to foster teacher retention by partnering with the City of Austin to explore future affordable housing options for educators and other public employees. Austin ATPE President Heidi Langan spoke to KXAN News this week about the local cost of teacher turnover. Her district has struggled to keep teachers who often leave for neighboring districts that offer higher salaries and where houses are more affordable. Check out the full interview here.


Are you a teacher or parent in a school district that is considering a District of Innovation (DOI) designation? ATPE has a resource page dedicated to helping stakeholders navigate the DOI process and learn about the types of laws that can be waived in districts that avail themselves of the new DOI law. Our resource page includes examples of some Texas school districts that have become DOIs and provides tips on how to share input with your district through the DOI process. Check out the DOI resource page here.