Tag Archives: registration

Texas election roundup: Registration deadline Monday!


An important deadline is approaching ahead of the critical Nov. 3 election! Monday, October 5 is the last to register to vote if you are not already registered in the county in which you plan to cast your ballot.

Everyone, whether you think you are registered or not, should check their registration status NOW via the Texas Secretary of State (SOS) website. In order to check your status, simply click the link above and locate the section on the right hand side of the page that says “Login.” Choose one of the three choices for identity verification: Voter unique identifier (VUID) and date of birth (DOB); Texas drivers license (TDL) and date of birth; or name, county, and date of birth.

You can find your VUID on your voter registration card that you received from your county voter registrar, but the easiest option for many people may just be to use their drivers license and date of birth. Once you’ve entered your information and clicked “Submit,” you will be taken to a second screen that displays your voter status. Look on the left hand side of the screen under the section labeled “Voter Information.” Find where it says “Voter Status” to confirm your status.

If your voter status shows you are not registered or if you receive a pop-up notification that reads “Voter not found using the information provided,” then you will need to contact your county voter registrar in order to confirm your registration or just fill out new registration paperwork. You can find the voter registrar for your county by clicking here.

The SOS website allows you to request a voter registration application by mail, which you can then turn into your county voter registrar, but that application is not likely to reach you in time for the Monday deadline. For that reason, you should use the SOS online registration feature. The site allows you to fill out a registration form online. Once the application is filled out:

  • Print the application
  • Sign it;
  • Insert in an envelope addressed to the county (the address is at the top of the form);
  • Place a first class stamp on the envelope; and
  • Drop it in the Mail – by October 5!

If you don’t have access to a printer, you can also register directly through your county voter registrar. In most cases, the process is as simple as going down to the county offices and filling out a simple form. Whichever method you use, be sure that your ballot is delivered or postmarked by Monday, October 5!

That’s the long and short of it. Make sure you are registered to vote in the county in which you plan to vote, and make sure every eligible voter you know is registered as well. That means if you are a college student, whether you decide to vote in your home county or in the county where you go to school is up to you — but the key is that you must be registered in the county in which you plan to vote. Registration is critical. Every vote will count in this election.


In other election news, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that there will be no straight-ticket voting in Texas for the Nov. 3 election. The Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a state law passed in 2017 that ended the practice of straight-ticket voting in Texas and overturned a ruling last week by a lower court judge who attempted to reinstate straight-ticket voting ahead of the election.


As we previously reported, state Rep. Drew Springer (R-Muenster) and metroplex salon owner Shelley Luther will head to a special runoff election to represent North Texas in the Texas Senate after Tuesday’s special election in Senate District (SD) 30. In the final tally, Luther led Springer by a microscopic margin of 32.17% to 31.93%, with just 164 votes separating the two. Gov. Greg Abbott will determine when to hold the runoff.


Gov. Abbott issued an order Thursday limiting counties to a single drop-off location for mail-in ballots. With a nationwide uptick in mail-in voting expected as a result of concerns over COVID-19 exposure, several cities have offered multiple locations for voters to hand deliver their mail-in ballot in order to reduce pressure on the postal service to deliver millions of mail-in ballots to county election officials on time. Harris County, which spans more than 1,700 square miles and is home to 2.4 million registered voters, offered a dozen locations for voters to drop off mail-in ballots. Travis County, which is home to more than 700,000 voters spread across 1,000 square miles, offered four locations. Gov. Abbott’s order limits each county to a single location regardless of size, citing an effort to “strengthen ballot security protocols.”

The governor did not describe how decreasing the number of drop-off locations would strengthen security protocols, and Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir called the move “a deliberate attempt to manipulate the election.” Despite the spread of misinformation regarding the security of mail-in voting, every study conducted thus far has affirmed that widespread voter fraud does not exist.


More than 73 million people tuned in to watch Tuesday night’s debate between President Donald Trump and former Vice-President Joe Biden. It was the first of three debates the campaigns have agreed to, in addition to one debate between vice-presidential candidates Mike Pence and Kamala Harris. The rest of the schedule is as follows:

  • Wednesday, October 7: Vice-presidential Debate
  • Thursday, October 15: Presidential Debate
  • Thursday, October 22: Presidential Debate

That means the last two presidential debates will happen while Texans are casting their ballots. Early voting in Texas begins Oct. 13 and runs through Oct. 30. Gov. Abbott extended the normal two-week early voting period to three weeks in order to facilitate better social distancing at polling locations. But it won’t do you any good if you’re not registered to vote. Check your registration today!

Texas election roundup: More court rulings

A pair of court decisions this week could make a significant impact on the November elections.

On Tuesday, the Texas Supreme Court ruled that three Green Party candidates must be restored to the November ballot, despite a lower court’s order to remove them because they had not paid the required filing fees. The conventional wisdom is that Green Party candidates tend to attract some voters who may have otherwise voted for a Democrat, and their presence in a close race could tip the balance toward the Republican candidate. The Texas Democratic Party filed the original complaint to remove the candidates, while the Republican justices on the Texas Supreme Court overturned the decision.

Another Texas Supreme Court decision announced Tuesday blocked Harris County from sending mail-in ballot applications to all registered voters in the county. As previously reported here at Teach the Vote, ballot applications are not the same as ballots themselves. In the Harry County case, voters would still have to make the determination of whether they are eligible to apply to vote by mail, then fill out and return the application in order to receive an actual ballot in the mail. If think you may be eligible and are considering voting by mail, check out this post by Teach the Vote that explains the process in detail.

These decisions underscore the importance of every single vote in this election. These decisions are likely to impact a relatively small number of votes, but the reason they are the subject of litigation in the first place is an acknowledgement of just how close the November elections could be.

Now onto lighter topics!

If you watched ABC this week, you may have caught the network special VOMO: Vote or Miss Out. The comedy special hosted by Kevin Hart featured guest appearances by Tiffany Hadish, Michelle Obama, Tim Allen, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and other celebrities urging Americans to vote. If you need a little comedic motivation, you can watch the full special here or watch clips on YouTube.

The Texas Tribune reported this week that new voter registrations in Texas have plummeted during the COVID-19 pandemic. The deadline to register to vote in the November 3 election is less than three weeks away. Voters have until October 5 to register to vote if you have not already done so in the county in which you plan to cast your ballot. If you’re unsure whether you are registered, you can use this tool on the Texas Secretary of State’s website. For more information about registering, click here.

Texas election roundup: Registration deadline approaching!

It’s hard to imagine, but we are quickly approaching another important election in Texas! The primary runoff elections that were postponed to July 14 from their original May 26 date are almost upon us. In fact, Monday, June 15, 2020, is the last day to register to vote before this election.

Not sure if you are registered to vote? Check your status online using this handy resource provided by the Texas Secretary of State. It’s a great habit to get into to take two minutes to make sure your voter address and registration status are correct and up-to-date. If you need to register or make corrections to your registration, click here.

While the following saying may or may not be attributable to founding father Thomas Jefferson, it is nonetheless true:

“We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.”

This is why ATPE continues to emphasize the importance of voting, and why your vote in a runoff election may be the most influential vote you cast throughout the entire election cycle. That’s because turnout is typically so low in a runoff election that the outcome of each race may be decided by just a handful of voters.

This is a critical time for our state. The candidates voters choose to represent them will have tremendous influence over school funding, state assessments, teacher pay, school safety, and countless other issues that will be even more important in light of the pandemic and the resulting economic recession. To put an even finer point on the matter, candidates elected this year to the Texas Legislature could make the difference in next year’s state budget decisions that will have a direct impact on school district staffing.

Remember also that in many cases here in Texas, the winners of the July 14 runoffs will become the ultimate winners of the final election in November, since so many races in Texas are decided by the primaries and not the general election. If you are eligible to vote in the upcoming runoff, as many of you are, we encourage you to learn about the candidates ahead of the election, and make sure your family and friends turn out to vote, as well.

Find out who is running in your district by checking out the Candidates section of our Teach the Vote website. Read their responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey, check out the incumbent legislators’ voting records on education issues, and arm yourself with the information necessary to make an informed choice in support of public education.

Make your voice heard. Early voting in the runoff elections begins June 29, 2020.

UPDATE: Texas election roundup: Runoff registration

*This post has been updated to reflect the governor’s decision to extend early voting in the July 14 primary runoffs by one week in an attempt to accommodate greater social distancing. Early voting will begin Monday, June 29, as opposed to July 6.

With the endless daily news updates on the coronavirus, it’s easy to forget that there’s still an election creeping up on us. The primary runoff elections that were originally scheduled to be held this month are now set for July 14, although a fierce battle is being waged over the best way to conduct this election in order to ensure the safety of Texas voters. We’ll provide an update on that important battle in a separate post. Instead, today’s post will brush up on who can vote in the runoffs.

In Texas, you don’t have to declare a political party. The primary elections are open, which means that anyone can vote in any primary they choose — but only one! If a single candidate doesn’t win at least 50% of the vote in a primary election with three or more candidates, the top two finishers head to a primary runoff election.

Anyone can vote in the runoffs — even if they didn’t vote in the the primaries! If you didn’t vote in the primary elections, you can vote in whichever party’s runoff you choose. It’s as simple as that.

Now here’s where the rules for runoffs get slightly more complicated. If you voted in the March 3 primary elections, you can only vote in the same party’s primary runoff election. So for example, if you voted in the Republican primary on March 3, then you can only vote in the Republican party’s runoff on July 14. You can’t switch.

So, how do I know if I’m eligible to vote? You have to be registered to vote in the county in which you live. If you’re not sure whether you’re registered — maybe you recently moved — you can check your registration status by clicking here. If you’re an eligible citizen 18 years or older and are not registered, the deadline to register to vote in the runoff elections is Monday, June 15, 2020. If you need to register, click here.

Here is a list of key dates leading up to the election:

  • Monday, June 15: Last day to register to vote in the July 14 elections.
  • Thursday, July 2: Last day to apply for a mail ballot. Applications must be received by the  election administrator on this date.
  • Monday, Jun 29: First day to vote early in person.
  • Friday, July 10: Last day to vote early in person before Election Day.
  • Tuesday, July 14: Primary Runoff Election Day.

Polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. Mail ballots must be received by the county election administrator by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day, with some exceptions, in order to count.

If you’re unsure of whether there is a runoff election in your district, just check the Candidates tab here at TeachtheVote.org and enter your address. You can also find the full list of runoff races in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

As we’ve previously reported, the low turnout typical of runoff elections means your vote in these races could be the single most influential vote you cast this election season! Consider this: Just 23.8% of registered voters participated in the March 3 primaries this year. That’s fewer than one in four! A little under 9% of voters cast ballots in the 2018 primary runoffs, which included a runoff for a statewide race. That means your vote in a runoff election is more than twice as likely to influence the outcome of an election as it is in a primary. And with the unprecedented level of uncertainty around this election in particular, each vote will represent even more.

Speaking of uncertainty, one of the biggest questions remains whether Texas leaders will provide a safe process for voting while the deadly coronavirus is still in circulation. Many voters have expressed a desire for mail-in voting eligibility to be expanded during the pandemic, but state officials are pushing back against the idea. We are monitoring this topic closely and will post new information here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog as developments occur.

Election 2020: The runoff rundown

Super Tuesday has come and gone, but many Texans have a runoff election just around the corner! In any primary election where a single candidate failed to win more than 50% of the vote, the top two candidates will head to a runoff election on May 26, 2020, to determine who wins their party’s nomination. This is your comprehensive guide to the runoffs from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.

The Candidates

The easiest way to know if you have a runoff election where you live is to visit the Candidate Search page here at Teach the Vote and enter your address. Here’s a list of all the runoffs around the state:

Some of the more high-profile races include the Republican runoff for State Board of Education (SBOE) District 5, in which controversial figure Robert Morrow came out on top in the primary election polling. Other hot races include the Democratic primary in Senate District (SD) 27, in which Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. is headed to a runoff after serving three decades in the Senate. In House District (HD) 59, Rep. J.D. Sheffield, a longtime Texas Parent PAC-endorsed officeholder, is facing a runoff opponent. Another Texas Parent PAC-endorsed candidate, Glenn Rogers, is headed to a runoff for the open seat in HD 60. Our Texas Primary election results blog post has more information on what happened Super Tuesday.

The Timing

The runoff election date is May 26, preceded by a week of early voting May 18 through May 22, 2020. If you didn’t vote in the primaries because you weren’t registered to vote, April 27 is the last to day to register in order to vote in the runoffs. If you’re newly eligible to vote and not yet registered, or recently moved to a different county and never updated your voter registration, now is the time to register!

Keep in mind, also, that there are two sets of elections taking place during the month of May. First, May 2, 2020, is the uniform election date for local elections, which often include school bond propositions, school board races, and other local matters. This is separate from the primary election runoffs that are decided on May 26, 2020. Check out all of the upcoming 2020 election dates, including early voting periods, as we shared in our Spring 2020 issue of ATPE News. We urge educators to vote in every election!

The Rules

Who gets to vote in a runoff election? If you voted in the Democratic primary this year, then you can only vote in the Democratic runoff. If you voted in the Republican primary this year, then you can only vote in the Republican runoff. If you didn’t vote in either primary this year, then you can vote in either party’s runoff election. The voting procedures are the same as in the runoff election. You’ll want to bring along one of the approved forms of identification or mark a form at the polling location indicating you have a “reasonable impediment” to obtaining that identification.

The Stakes

Why is my vote important? There were plenty of races decided on March 3 by just a handful of votes. Voter turnout in Texas is typically low, especially in primary elections and even more so in runoff elections. Just 23.8% of registered voters — less than one in four — participated in the March 3 primaries this year, despite the fact that this is a presidential election year. A little under 9.0% cast ballots in the 2018 primary runoffs, which included a statewide runoff for the Democratic gubernatorial candidate. That means your vote in a runoff election is more than twice as likely to influence the outcome of an election as it is in a primary. And it’s absolutely critical that educators influence elections in 2020. Everything from funding for schools and teacher salaries to electoral maps that decide who gets elected in the future are up for grabs. You can read more in our Primary Colors blog series here on Teach the Vote.

Now let’s start making a voting plan for the May 26 runoffs!

Last chance to register for Nov. 6 election

If you don’t vote, you can’t complain.

It’s just that simple.

November 6 is less than a month away, and a crucial deadline is upon us. Tuesday, Oct. 9, is the last day for those who have not yet registered to vote to do so in order to cast your ballot.

This is also an important date for those who are registered to vote, but may have recently relocated. For example, you may have registered to vote in Harris County, but recently moved to Travis County. In that case, you have until tomorrow to register in Travis County; otherwise, you’d have to drive back to Harris County to cast your ballot Nov. 6.

So how do I register?

The Texas Secretary of State’s VoteTexas.org website tells you just about everything you need to know. First off, it allows you check if you’re already registered. If you’re not, there are two basic ways you can register.

The first method is to simply find your county’s voter registrar and fill out an application in person. The voter registrar is usually tax assessor-collector or county clerk, and their office is easy to find by doing a web search. The application is generally a single page and should take you less than five minutes. Your other option is to fill out the state’s online application and mail it to your county’s voter registrar by tomorrow. You can read more information about how to find an application by clicking here.

How do I know if I’m eligible to register to vote?

You are eligible to register to vote if:

  • You are a United States citizen;
  • You are a resident of the county where you submit the application;
  • You are at least 17 years and 10 months old, and you are 18 years of age on Election Day.
  • You are not a convicted felon (you may be eligible to vote if you have completed your sentence, probation, and parole); and
  • You have not been declared by a court exercising probate jurisdiction to be either totally mentally incapacitated or partially mentally incapacitated without the right to vote.

The Texas Tribune also put together some voter registration resources here. Once you’ve registered to vote, make sure and go to TeachTheVote.org and click on the CANDIDATES tab to see who’s running in your area. You can view each’s candidate’s answers to our public education policy survey, as well as how incumbent legislators voted on important education issues last session.

If we’ve said it once, we’ve said it a hundred times: Legislative battles are won in November. If we fail to elect strong pro-public education candidates, we can’t expect to prevail when important education questions are debated in the Texas Legislature. This election is CRITICAL to making sure we move the ball forward, not backward.

Even if you’re already registered, you can do your part by informing friends and family that Tuesday is the last chance to register if they haven’t already – and make sure they follow through! Early voting begins Oct. 22 and runs through Nov. 2, and Election Day is Nov. 6.