Tag Archives: pre-k

Senate Education Committee takes up school finance bills

After a long wait and repeated delays, the Senate Education Committee is hearing school finance reform legislation today, Thursday, April 25. Chairman Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood) laid out committee substitutes for the Senate’s school finance bill, Senate Bill (SB) 4, and the school finance finance bill passed by the House, House Bill (HB) 3 this morning. The Senate’s proposed substitute language is the same for each bill, and the committee is hearing testimony on both simultaneously.

Below are highlights of some of the main points of the Senate’s version of HB 3/SB 4:

EDUCATION

  • Would expand free pre-K eligibility to teachers’ children.
  • Would grant full-time teachers and librarians a $5,000 pay raise for the 2019-20 school year, and create an allotment to provide related funding to school districts for salaries of teachers and librarians.
  • Would institute a merit pay program by creating recognized, exemplary, and master teacher designations. The program would require districts to adopt new teacher evaluation criteria to be approved by the commissioner of education for purposes of ranking all teachers and determining which ones might qualify for additional incentive pay. The bill states that districts and the commissioner may not rely “solely” on students’ standardized test results in making those determinations. However, ATPE believes that criteria for the distinctions and awards would still be based largely upon STAAR test results in order to facilitate statewide comparisons of teachers. School districts would be required to share all their teachers’ evaluations with the Texas Education Agency.
  • Would create outcomes-based funding by which districts may receive additional funding based upon third grade reading STAAR test results and college, career, or military readiness indicators. This could increase the high-stakes emphasis on student testing and adversely affect funding for struggling schools that are in the greatest need of additional resources.
  • Would call for a study of education cost drivers and geographic differences in education costs.
  • Would create early reading funding for grades K-3 or full-day pre-K.
  • Would create additional funding for dyslexia, dual language, and blended learning programs.
  • Would require that high school students complete a free application for federal student aid (FAFSA) in order to graduate.
  • Would break the STAAR test into smaller tests and prohibit testing on a Monday.
  • Would create a campus turnaround plan as proposed in SB 1412, which includes incentive pay. Under this plan, teachers would be incentivized to work at campuses with higher needs, although there would likely be a student testing component. The plan also requires contracting with a third-party vendor.

SCHOOL FUNDING

  • Would increase the basic allotment to $5,880 from $5,140, but eliminates the adjusted basic alloment.
  • Would increase compensatory education funding and would fund based upon a spectrum that acknowledges students’ varying degrees of economic disadvantage.
  • Would switch to tax collections based on current year property values.
  • Would repeal certain formulas, such as the cost of education index (CEI) and high school allotment, and roll them into the basic allotment.
  • Would attempt to ensure that recapture does not reduce school district budgets.
  • Would base transportation funding on mileage, but without setting a minimum rate.
  • Would require charter schools to pay into the Teacher Retirement System (TRS).

PROPERTY TAX

  • Would increase the homestead exemption by $15k to $40k contingent upon voter approval of a one cent sales tax increase, bringing the overall sales tax to the nation’s highest at 9.25 percent.

During this morning’s explanation of the bill and early testimony by Commissioner Mike Morath and other TEA staff, Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston) voiced “grave concerns” with the portion of the bill that makes property tax relief through an increase in the homestead exemption contingent upon Texas voters approving a sales tax increase. Sen. Bettencourt, who chairs the Senate Property Tax Relief Committee, argued that such a tax swap would not be neutral, and he suggested alternatives such as expanding the tax base to online sales.

SENATE VS. HOUSE

Senate Education Committee meeting April 25, 2019.

The version of the school finance bill discussed Thursday differs from the version of HB 3 that the House passed by a nearly unanimous vote. The new Senate version brings back outcomes-based funding and the merit pay provisions that ATPE  opposed and House members wisely stripped out of HB 3. The Senate version increases the basic allotment to $5,880 versus $6,030 in the House version. The Senate version of HB 3/SB 4 includes a $5,000 pay raise for teachers and librarians, but the Senate proposal currently includes no language to ensure that the educators receive those raises in future years (unlike SB 3 that the Senate passed earlier this session). The property tax relief proposed in the Senate school finance bill includes an increase to the homestead exemption that is contingent upon a sales tax swap, while the House version does not offer an increase to the homestead exemption.

Both the Senate and House versions include additional funding for dyslexia, dual language, and blended learning programs. Both would increase compensatory education funding and would fund based upon a spectrum that acknowledges varying degrees of economic disadvantage. Both versions would base transportation funding on mileage and repeal outdated formulas, such as the cost of education index (CEI) and high school allotment, and roll them into the basic allotment.

The Senate Education Committee will be hearing public testimony on the bill throughout the day. Chairman Taylor indicated that the committee most likely will vote on the bill later next week. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote and follow us on Twitter for updates as the school finance hearing continues today and additional witnesses provide testimony, including ATPE.

House Public Education Committee hears 31 bills on playgrounds, pre-K, and more

House Public Education Committee meeting, April 23, 2019

On Tuesday, April 23, 2019, the House Public Education Committee heard 31 bills relating to a variety of topics, including the use of school counselors’ time, special education evaluation notices, the role of the fine arts curriculum, and creating inclusive playgrounds that are accessible to all students.

ATPE supported several bills considered at the hearing, including:

  • House Bill (HB) 142 (Moody, D-El Paso): Would require TEA to develop a notice for distribution and internet posting that includes reporting changes for special education indicators and the rights of children to special education evaluation. Would also require districts to include additional information on the notice about initiating a referral for special education services. Rep. Moody stated that there is money set aside in the proposed state budget to accomplish the goals of his bill.
  • HB 727 (Gonzalez, M., D-Clint): Would require that school boards adopt a policy requiring school counselors to spend at least 80% of their time on core counseling duties. If the district can’t meet this requirement, the policy must include reasons why, duties the counselor will have to do, and set the actual percentage in the policy.
  • HB 1763 (Blanco, D-El Paso): Would add children of educators employed by school districts to the eligibility list for free pre-kindergarten.
  • HB 4030 (Dominguez, D-Brownsville): Would provide funding for school districts to provide at least one playground in the district that is inclusive and accessible for students with disabilities.
  • HB 4414 (Allison, R-San Antonio): Would require TEA to develop a rubric for Regional Education Service Centers (ESCs) to use for identifying resources related to student mental health. ESCs would be required to use the rubric and report back to TEA. TEA would also have to create a statewide inventory of mental health resources and a statewide plan for student mental health.

During Tuesday’s hearing, ATPE also provided written testimony against HB 3623 by Rep. Matt Schaefer. The bill would affect teachers employed under continuing contracts, making them eligible to stay in their jobs only if the majority of their students meet a “minimum growth standard” to be determined by the district and approved by the Commissioner. ATPE testified that HB 3623’s reliance on an unspecified “minimum growth standard” hints at the use of value-added modeling (VAM), which has been widely criticized as a tool that improperly uses students’ standardized test scores for high-stakes purposes. ATPE also pointed out that many teachers do not teach tested subjects or grades. ATPE’s testimony also questioned what the due process protections would be for affected teachers whose students do not meet the standard. In the hearing, Rep. Schaefer faced questions from Reps. Allen, Gonzalez, and Talarico on the vagueness of what “growth” means in the bill and on the importance of other non-academic factors. Read ATPE’s written testimony on HB 3623 here.

The following bills were also heard by the House Public Education Committee on Tuesday:

  • HB 535 (Neave, D-Dallas): Would require students to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TAFSA), in order to graduate, with some exceptions. Rep. Neave noted that this was recommendation #27 in the Texas Commission on Public School Finance final report issued last year.
  • HB 2217 (Raymond, D-Laredo): Would provide that school boards do not have to hear complaints concerning parent participation in extracurricular activities that do not involve a violation of a right.
  • HB 2526 (Leach, R-Plano): Would enable students whose parent(s) reside within the school district to be granted automatic admission. Rep. Leach shared that this bill would fix the predicament of his constituent who had the district boundary line in her backyard.
  • HB 3005 (Talarico, D-Round Rock): Would open college preparatory math and English language arts courses to 11th graders who demonstrate that they would otherwise be unable to take it in their 12th grade year and complete the requirements for high school graduation. Rep. Talarico said the bill was requested by Pflugerville ISD.
  • HB 3025 (Talarico, D-Round Rock): Would allow districts or schools to provide parents with a facilitated meeting with the school counselor regarding accepting or declining a special education evaluation on behalf of the student, should the parent dispute the referral. Rep. Talarico said this bill was brought to him by special education advocates.
  • HB 3026 (Talarico, D-Round Rock): Would require that school districts with 400 or more students have a ratio of 400:1 students to behavioral health professionals (which includes school counselors, licensed specialists in school psychology, social workers, and licensed professional counselors). The bill also outlines duties of the mental health professional within the school setting.
  • HB 3153 (Raymond, D-Laredo): Would allow a nepotism exception for a teacher in a subject or geographic area certified as a critical shortage area.
  • HB 3179 (Stucky, R-Denton): Would require the Commissioner to adopt rules to allow districts to submit information in the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) on the cost of assessments, including administration, participation, preparation, and training.
  • HB 3316 (White, R-Hillister): Would expand the campus crime stoppers program by adding school districts and charters to the entities that a crime stoppers organization reports to, as well as adding threats to public safety or an individual to the activities that the crime stoppers report on. This bill would also add a student advisory member to the program.
  • HB 3344 (Bucy, D-Austin): Would add fine arts to the required foundation curriculum. Rep. Bucy stated that students in fine arts have better educational outcomes.
  • HB 3452 (Dutton, D-Houston): Would require the Commissioner to evaluate all dropout recovery schools under the alternative education accountability system, and to only consider performance at the level of “approaches grade level.” The “closing the gaps” domain would be used for reporting purposes only.
  • HB 3489 (Cole, D-Austin): Would require TEA to create a task force on sex-based harassment in schools to evaluate and provide recommendations and best practices, including school district professional development.
  • HB 3651 (Davis, Y., D-Dallas): Would require the Commissioner to conduct a study on the relationship between district size, cost, and academic effectiveness.
  • HB 3851 (Lang, R-Granbury): Would require the Comptroller to publish and maintain a list of unfunded mandates and report to the legislature on findings about the benefits and costs of each mandate.
  • HB 3880 (Wilson, R-Marble Falls): Would transfer the duty to develop and provide information to students about steroids from the State Board of Education (SBOE) and TEA to the Department of State Health Services Mental Health and Substance Abuse, in conjunction with the University Interscholastic League (UIL).
  • HB 3888 (Ramos, D-Richardson): Would add suicide to the conditions addressed by the school health advisory council (SHAC). Would also add require SHACs to provide strategies to increase parental awareness regarding risky behaviors, early warning signs of suicide risks, and available community programs and services to address these. The bill would require districts where at least 70% of the students are educationally disadvantaged, homeless, or in foster care to develop and implement a plan to increase parent and student knowledge of behavioral health disorders and treatment options.
  • HB 4094 (Beckley, D-Carrollton): Would require districts to make at least one attempt by phone or e-mail during each week of a student’s meal account grace period to make arrangements with the parent for payment of a negative balance and help the parent complete an application for free or reduced price lunch (FRPL). After the grace period ends, the district may allow the student to continue purchasing meals or provide alternative meals at no cost. The bill would also allow districts to pay a negative balance using donations.
  • HB 4186 (Sanford, R-McKinney): Would create the “Next Generation Commission on Digital Learning” to make recommendations for a framework for digital teaching and learning in public schools following the same structure as last year’s school finance commission.
  • HB 4302 (VanDeaver, R-New Boston): Would prohibit issuance of subpoenas for audio/video surveillance of special education settings unless they meet under Texas Education Code (TEC) Section 29.022. Rep. VanDeaver cited a case  in which video was subpoenaed to observe the “educational record” of a student that did not involve complaints of abuse or neglect. Only cases of abuse or neglect were the focus of the original intent of the video camera law enacted in 2015.
  • HB 4313 (Dominguez, D-Brownsville): Would require the UIL to create an adaptive sports program for students with disabilities.
  • HB 4324 (VanDeaver, R-New Boston): Would allow the Commissioners of both TEA and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) to approve a format of electronic submission of student records, such as the Texas Records Exchange (TREx), that allows for the transfer and efficient and effective extraction of data elements from student transcripts.
  • HB 4383 (Bohac, R-Houston): Would require school districts and charters to prepare a list of instructional materials provided to students that cover each Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) element. This list would be part of an existing annual certification that each district and charter school must submit to the SBOE and Commissioner.
  • HB 4578 (Gervin-Hawkins, R-San Antonio): Would require the SBOE, TEA, and stakeholders to enter into a memorandum of understanding on the development of culturally inclusive instruction.
  • HB 4589 and HJR 150 (Anchia, D-San Antonio): Would add a “global competitiveness” objective to the public education mission in the Texas Constitution by stating that students will earn a post-secondary credential after high school. This bill would also require that each legislature establish standards that public schools must satisfy and align then with the state’s “60×30” plan, which provides that by 2030, at least 60 percent of Texans ages 25-34 will hold a certificate or degree.

At the end of Tuesday’s House Public Education Committee hearing, Chairman Huberty announced that the committee will meet again on Wednesday afternoon, April 24, to vote on pending bills that have already been heard. He added that next week the committee will meet to hear mainly Senate bills that have made their way over to the House and been referred to House Public Education. Up to this point, the committee has not yet heard any public testimony on Senate bills, so stay tuned!

House Public Education Committee hears bills on pre-K, tech apps, educator prep, data transparency, and more

On Tuesday, April 2, 2019, the House Public Education Committee heard several bills related to a variety of topics.

ATPE registered positions in support of three of the bills heard in committee:

  • House Bill (HB) 1517 (Coleman, D-Houston): Would require schools, including charters, to notify parents if they do not have a full-time nurse for 30 or more consecutive instructional days. The bill excludes schools that enroll fewer than 10,000 students.
  • HB 2030 (Turner, John, D-Dallas): Would allow eligible three-year-olds enrolled in pre-K to continue their eligibility the next school year, which helps parents avoid intensive paperwork of re-registration and reduces the administrative burden on districts.
  • HB 2184 (Allen, D-Houston): Would create collaborative policies for improving a student’s transition from an alternative education setting back to the regular classroom. A committee substitute for the bill clarifies that teachers who implement the transition plan are included on the planning committee.

The following bills were also heard by the committee:

  • HB 963 (Bell, C., R-Magnolia): Would add technology applications courses to the career and technical education (CTE) allotment, so that students in those courses would receive the same weighted funding as students in CTE courses.
  • HB 1468 (Talarico, D-Round Rock): Would create a “public school mental health task force” to determine the effectiveness of school counseling programs and ways to improve school climate and report that data to the Texas Education Agency (TEA).
  • HB 2984 (Allison, R-San Antonio): Would require the State Board of Education (SBOE) to add essential knowledge and skills (TEKS) to the technology applications curriculum related to coding, computer programming, computational thinking, and cybersecurity. One witness noted that the TEKS are set to be revised in 2021 regardless.
  • HB 3007 (Turner, Chris, D-Grand Prairie) Would require TEA to provide districts all source data that was used in computing their accountability ratings. Rep. Turner stated that districts are not given access to all the data used to determine their A-F accountability ratings and that his bill gives districts the opportunity to view the data during the appeals process. Witnesses representing Arlington ISD, who requested the bill, testified that their college, career, and military readiness data was missing information on 206 students.
  • HB 3217 (Ashby, R-Lufkin): Would reauthorize institutions of higher education to offer a bachelor’s degree in education and eliminate the 18-semester-hour cap on the number of education courses allowed for a degree. One witness testified against the bill, stating that Texas needs subject matter specialists and that content hours should not be decreased. The Texas Association of Colleges for Teacher Education spoke to the importance of pedagogy and testified that students would not experience longer degrees as a result of the bill.
  • HB 3323 (Burns, R-Cleburne): Would require a school district to post employment policy documents on its website.
  • HB 3435 (Bowers, D-Garland): Would establish March 1 as Texas Girls in STEM Day.
  • HB 3966 (Raymond, D-Laredo:  Would require the governor to designate Holocaust Remembrance Week in public schools.
  • HB 3710 (Bell, K., R-Forney): Would require TEA to develop free, electronic tutorials for end-of-course assessments at an estimated cost of $3/student.
  • HB 4310 (Dutton, D-Houston): Would require districts to allow teachers sufficient time to teach a given curriculum and states that districts may not penalize a teacher for failing to follow the scope and sequence timeline if the teacher determines that the students need more learning time.
  • HB 4487 (Frullo, R-Lubbock): States that students sent to the campus behavior coordinator are not considered to have been removed from the classroom for purposes of reporting in the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS).
  • HCR 59 (Guillen, D-Rio Grande City): Would designate the second week of November as School Psychologist Appreciation Week.

The House Public Education Committee will meet again on Thursday, April 4, to hear bills on UIL and student health, and again on Tuesday, April 9, to hear bills related to charter schools. In news from the full House, Chairman Huberty’s school finance and tax reform bill, House Bill 3, will be up for debate in the House chamber on Wednesday, April 3. Follow @TeachtheVote and your ATPE lobbyists (@ATPE_AndreaC, @ATPE_MontyE, @ATPE_JenniferM, and @markwigginstx) on Twitter for updates on the action!

House Public Education Committee hears hours of testimony on school finance plan, HB 3

On Tuesday, March 12, 2019, the House Public Education Committee heard over 12 hours of testimony from 116 individuals on the House school finance plan, House Bill (HB) 3. Testifiers ranged from elementary school students to superintendents and teacher associations. There were 187 individuals registered, with 131 for the bill, 46 neutral (including ATPE), and 10 against. Public comment was largely positive, with concerns bubbling to the surface on the teacher merit-based-pay portion of the bill, increased inequity between property wealthy and property poor districts, and the integration of the current gifted and talented allotment into base funding.

Every testimonial began with gratitude for the many aspects of the bill that improve school funding. These include reimbursements for real costs associated with administration of SAT/ACT and certifications for career and technical education (CTE) students, a substantial increase to the basic allotment from $5,140/student to $6,030/student, new dual language and dyslexia weights, the extension of CTE funding to middle school students, increases to early childhood through the early reading allotment, and efforts to target funds to schools serving students in concentrated poverty.

The majority of testimony, including that from parents and children, focused on the bill’s proposal to roll the gifted and talented (G/T) allotment into the basic allotment instead. Currently, G/T students are funded at a 0.12 weight, but district enrollment is capped at 5%. Most, if not all, districts enroll the maximum of 5% of students. Therefore, districts receive the maximum funding for G/T students. By rolling G/T funding into the basic allotment, the base level of funding is raised and all districts still get the money and are still statutorily required to provide the G/T program. Testifiers advocating for G/T expressed concern that districts would no longer implement G/T programs to fidelity without the allotment, even with the ability under HB 3 for G/T funding to be 100% stripped should a district opt not to certify that it is providing a G/T program.

The concern with the merit-based teacher pay portion of the bill was mainly voiced by teacher groups such as ATPE, the Texas- American Federation of Teachers, the Texas State Teachers Association, and the Texas Classroom Teachers Association, along with a number of teachers who took time to come to Austin to personally express similar disapproval of the inclusion of merit pay in the bill. Testifiers stated that the bill gives the Commissioner of Education (who is un-elected) too much power, assumes that data exists to evaluate all teachers in every subject area, allows for very subjective and potentially biased student surveys to be used for evaluating and ranking teachers, and does not include factors for teachers’ years of experience. Several witnesses told the committee that teachers deserve an across-the-board pay raise before legislators discuss a state framework for differentiated pay, which is similar to but far more acceptable than traditional notions of merit pay. Another area of concern in HB 3, which ATPE noted in our testimony yesterday, is that the bill complicates state laws regarding the minimum salary schedule – creating a new, separate salary schedule for most teachers while keeping counselors, nurses, and librarians on the minimum salary schedule currently found in law – and would allow any school district to simply opt out of using the state’s minimum salary schedule.

The concern over linking teacher pay to student performance metrics, which most see as little more than paying for STAAR scores, is especially concerning amidst ongoing reporting that STAAR has been shown to be unreliable. This spurred discussion from Rep. Ken King (R-Canadian), who repeatedly argued that the bill does not mandate the use of the STAAR test for the teacher designations and merit-pay outlined in the bill. However, a reading of the bill clearly outlines the criteria for the tests that can be used, as well as the requirement for the commissioner to use comparative state data to create forced rankings of teachers.

ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testifying before the House Public Education Committee on March 12, 2019

ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testified neutrally on HB 3, echoing many of the same concerns and was able to tease out many of the push-backs from committee members. Exter expressed that although the bill has some very positive qualities in that it manages to provide at least some level of funding increase for almost all districts while also increasing funding for special populations, a nearly herculean task, aspects of HB 3 that promote merit pay tied to testing are not appropriate for stimulating educational improvement. Exter noted for the committee that ATPE members through the member written and adopted legislative program, “oppose the use of student performance, including test scores as the primary measure of a teacher’s effectiveness, as the determining factor for a teacher’s compensation or as the primary rationale for an adverse employment action.” As with other witnesses testifying on behalf of teachers yesterday, ATPE’s testimony included the fact that we are aware of no other common metric shared by districts across the state that the commissioner could use to rank teachers for purposes of the proposed merit pay program other than STAAR test results.

In the end, Exter implored the committee not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good, noting that the few parts of the bill educators oppose, including merit pay, are not integral to the functioning of the larger bill; if those parts of the bill were removed, Exter tstified, Texas educators could very likely enthusiastically support HB 3. Watch Exter’s full exchange with the committee here beginning at the 5 hour and 24 minute mark. Exter’s testimony was preceded by ATPE member and former Texas Secondary Teacher of the Year Stephanie Stoebe. ATPE State Vice president Tonja Gray also testified later in the hearing. View ATPE’s written testimony on HB 3 here.

Other education stakeholders focused their testimony in yesterday’s hearing more on concerns surrounding financial equity. While we won’t get into the weeds about tax effort and the guaranteed yield of different tax rates (and thus, golden and copper pennies), the general sentiment expressed was that HB 3 would increase inequity between property wealthy and property poor districts over time. For much more detailed information on this issue, please see testimony provided by the Equity Center and the Center for Public Policy Priorities on HB 3.

In addition to the tax inequity aspect, small and midsize districts and their representatives argued against moving the small and midsize adjustment, which adjusts the basic allotment to a higher amount to account for diseconomies of scale, to an allotment under HB 3. In current law, the adjustment is applied to the basic allotment before additional  funding weights (compensatory education, bilingual education, special education) are applied for various types of students, adding more money. Under HB 3, the adjustment would be applied to the basic allotment just like any other student weight, which advocates argue would reduce overall funding for specific student populations.

Yesterday’s hearing was likely to be the only opportunity for public comment on this version of HB 3 in the House. Once HB 3 is brought up in the House Public Education Committee again, which we expect to happen next week, it will likely be in the form of a committee substitute (a changed version) and the committee is not required to take additional testimony before voting on the bill. Follow ATPE Lobbyists on Twitter @ATPE_AndreaC, @ATPE_MontyE, @ATPE_JenniferM, and @MarkWigginsTX to get up-to-date news on HB 3 as it moves through the legislative process.

House Public Education Committee hears first bills of the 86th session

Today, the House Public Education Committee heard the first education bills of the session. The bills spanned topics including prekindergarten class sizes, educator preparation and training, assessment, and special education. ATPE supported several bills on the agenda, including these:

  • House Bill (HB) 55 (Gonzalez, D-Clint) Limit prekindergarten class-size and class size ratios to align with high-quality standards.
  • HB 108 (Gonzalez, D-Clint) Create a digital portfolio assessment pilot program.
  • HB 109 (Martinez, D-Weslaco) Allow charter schools to have a holiday on Memorial Day.
  • HB 111 (Gonzalez, D-Clint) Create educator training requirements on recognizing the abuse and maltreatment of students with severe cognitive disabilities.
  • HB 116 (Gonzalez, D-Clint) Improve educator preparation and training to better prepare teachers to serve students with disabilities.
  • HB 120 (Gonzalez, D-Clint) Add an extra year of delay to testing for recent immigrants who are learning English.
  • HB 165 (Bernal, D-San Antonio) Increase equity and the ability of special education students to receive high school endorsements.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifying before the House Public Education Committee, Feb. 19, 2019

In addition to the bills above, ATPE’s newest lobbyist, Andrea Chevalier, testified in support of HB 102 by Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio). The bill would improve and fund mentoring programs for teachers. As noted in our testimony, the ability of school districts to access additional funding to pay mentor teachers is a great way of providing differentiated pay that rewards the service and expertise of experienced teachers. Additionally, mentor programs have been shown to improve the effectiveness of beginning teachers, as well as teacher retention.

Other bills on the agenda today, for which ATPE did not take a position, included the following:

  • HB 65 (Johnson, E., D-Dallas)- Would require districts to report information on out-of-school suspensions.
  • HB 128 (Hinojosa, D-Austin)- Would require that districts send the results of student physical assessment to parents.
  • HB 134 (Swanson, R-Spring)- Limits bond elections so that only one project or category of projects can be included within each proposition.
  • HB 187 (Reynolds, D-Missouri City)- Alters the composition of the Fort Bend ISD School Board so that one member is at-large and the rest of the members are elected from single-member districts.

 

ATPE and others testify on school finance commission recommendations

This week, the House Public Education Committee received feedback from various stakeholders regarding recommendations of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance. Tuesday and Wednesday, committee members heard testimony from panels including three former House Public Education Committee chairs, superintendents, trustees, teachers, and representatives of education associations. Rural, suburban, and urban districts were represented, as well as charter and traditional public schools.

The overwhelming majority of testifiers expressed support for the commission’s recommended increase in the spectrum weight and the dual language weight. These would help create equity by funding certain student populations at higher levels. Most witnesses also commended the commission’s recommendation to fund early childhood education, but were concerned with its sustainability and with tying it to third-grade reading scores.

Among the concerns commonly expressed by stakeholders was outcomes-based funding. District leaders said they would like  local flexibility in implementing merit-based, outcomes-based, or performance-based funding mechanisms for their teachers. Apprehension with outcomes-based funding derived from mistrust or lack of confidence in the current assessment system’s ability to accurately capture student learning. In fact, an equal proportion of Tuesday’s discussions seemed to focus on assessment as on school finance. Some leaders expressed that tying funding to tests would reinforce teaching-to-the-test, and some stakeholders suggested that base teacher pay be addressed before additional incentive mechanisms.

Stakeholders representing small and midsize districts (up to 5,000 students) also expressed concern with the commission’s recommendation to move the small and midsize funding adjustment out of formula, which could alter funding to these special student populations, affecting the districts’ ability to meet federal obligations for financial maintenance of effort under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

Overall, stakeholders also expressed concerns with any funding changes that were not part of the base formula, given that similar funding approaches in the past have been less reliable. An example cited was Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K) funding under House Bill (HB) 4 of 2015, which created an optional grant program should districts decide to offer high-quality Pre-K. Another potential funding change discussed this week was the Cost of Education Index (CEI). While some testified that they were uncomfortable with the idea of the CEI being eliminated, Chairman Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) reiterated his intent for definite removal of the CEI in any school finance overhaul this session.

While this week’s testimony nearly always touched on teacher compensation, an important aspect of teaching beyond pay arose in the conversations: mentoring. A few witnesses expressed that the best first-year investment is a mentor teacher and that having mentor teachers is another way to provide extra compensation. Special education is another topic that came up during the hours of testimony, even though it was not widely broached by the commission last year other than through a discussion of funding for dyslexia. In testimony, several special education advocates suggested revamping the way special education is funded, which is currently done by placement rather than services. Chairman Huberty was favorable to the ideas presented.

Monty Exter

ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, was last to testify Wednesday evening. He shared that ATPE supports the commission’s recommended changes to the weights, local flexibility in spending weighted dollars, and increases to the basic allotment. He expressed concerns with outcomes-based funding and suggested an adequate base increase for teachers and others on the education team first. Exter also offered that inputs should be incentivized as well, in a similar way to how high-quality Pre-K was incentivized through the HB 4 grant program. Lastly, Exter testified that teacher quality is related to educator preparation, another topic that cannot be forgotten when discussing increasing teacher effectiveness.

School finance commission considers first round of recommendations

The Texas Commission on Public School Finance met Tuesday morning to discuss recommendations from the working group on outcomes, lead by Todd Williams. Commission Chair Scott Brister opened the meeting by requesting suggestions for how to pay for the various recommendations the commission has received.

Texas Commission on Public School Finance meeting July 10, 2018.

Texas Education Agency (TEA) Chief School Finance Officer Leo Lopez was the first invited witness, and provided an overview of how public education in Texas is funded. Currently, the state pays 36 percent of the total cost of funding schools. Excluding local recapture, the bulk of funding – 51 percent – is carried by local property taxes. Recapture, which is also local funding but was counted separately for the purposes of Lopez’s presentation on Tuesday, amounts for three percent of funding. The remainder comes from federal funding.

According to TEA’s numbers, state funding on a per-student basis has remained flat since 2008. When adjusted for inflation, this represents a decline in actual dollars. In the same time period, the biggest increase in funding has come from local property taxes. Legislative Budget Board (LBB) Assistant Director John McGeady explained that while the LBB and TEA use different calculations to determine state spending, both sets of data show the state’s share of funding has steadily declined over the past decade.

Williams introduced the same recommendations the working group approved last week, which include outcome-based incentives at the 3rd, 8th, and 12th grade levels. The 3rd grade reading gateway would be supplemented by increased funding for schools with high populations of economically disadvantaged and English learner students that could be used to provide full-day prekindergarten. The 8th grade incentives would target reading and Algebra I, and 12th grade would focus on indicators of post-secondary readiness.

The recommendations from the outcomes working group also include a performance pay system that would reward teachers who complete more rigorous educator preparation programs, provide higher pay for educators according to locally-developed, multi-metric performance evaluation programs, and incent administrators to direct the highest performing educators into campuses and grade levels with the greatest need.

State Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston), who has argued against increasing school funding, argued fiercely against objective data presented by Williams that indicate Texas will miss its “60×30” goal by two decades years. The goal is to ensure that 60 percent of Texas 25- to 34-year olds obtain a postsecondary degree or certificate by 2030. According to current rates of postsecondary attainment, the state will not reach this goal until 2051. Bettencourt argued businesses rely on net migration into the state, despite the fact that this necessarily reduces the number of high paying jobs available to students educated in Texas.

Williams told the members he would welcome feedback on the recommendations, and suggested more testimony could be taken, specifically from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) regarding 60×30 progress. State Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) suggested the working group could collect comments and produce a revised draft.

Williams estimated the cost of implementing the recommendations at $1 billion annually, or $2 billion per biennium. This would gradually increase to $2.5 billion annually over a ten-year period, as districts meet stretch goals and additional districts phase in the recommendations. This could ultimately save the state money by higher-paid workers contributing more state taxes, and fewer state resources would be needed for uninsured medical costs and incarceration. The expenditures working group is expected to meet August 9 to work on recommendations. House Public Education Committee Chair Dan Huberty (R-Houston), who leads the expenditures working group, said more than 200 recommendations have been received. The full commission does not plan to meet until September.

Brister said the commission will not hold a vote until the total cost of recommendations can be calculated and until the commission can determine from where the money to pay for them will come.

Working group releases first set of school finance recommendations

The Texas Commission on Public School Finance working group on outcomes met Tuesday in Austin to consider recommendations based on more than 60 hours of testimony heard by the commission since its first meeting in January.

School finance commission working group on outcomes meeting July 3, 2018.

Group leader Todd Williams began the meeting reading from a detailed report that suggested the state should invest more dollars in specific strategies to accelerate reaching the “60×30” goal of ensuring 60 percent of students go onto post-secondary success by the year 2030.

Common themes from testimony included the importance of early intervention, since only 60 percent of students arrive at school kindergarten-ready. The report indicated teachers are the most important in-school factor in student outcomes, and funding should ensure that every teacher candidate has access to high quality educator preparation programs, ensure they stay in the profession and classroom, and ensure they address student challenges as early as possible.

In order to achieve post-secondary achievement, the report suggested funding should ensure graduates do not require remediation in higher education and that achievement of a post-secondary credential is not only expected, but achievable, affordable and supported. In addition, the report suggested systemic incentives, including ensuring that financial incentives are tied to the achievement of our most critical outcomes.

The working group’s formal recommendations encompass three core principles: Ready to learn, ready to teach, and ready to earn. According to the report, funding should include some specific incentives within the formula funding tied to specific goals at critical gates.

The first of these incentive gates is 3rd grade reading, and the working group is recommending providing an additional weight for low income and/or English language learners for pre-K through grade 3. At each district’s discretion, dollars from this 3rd grade reading investment would be sufficient to be used to fund full day pre-K, tutoring interventions, expanded dual language programs, specialized multi-year early childhood professional development, and a longer school year.

The second incentive is funding for every 8th grader who meets the state’s standard in reading and Algebra I. This is expected to help increase college readiness. The third incentive is funding for every high school graduate assessed as college or career ready, who successfully achieves industry certification or enrolls in college or the military. Incentives for rewarding low-income student achievement should be higher in recognition of the greater associated challenges. State Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) was emphatic that incentives should not further increase inequity in the school funding system.

The fourth incentive is to provide the optional ability for districts to implement multi-measure evaluation systems and fund higher teacher distinction levels to attract and retain high-quality teachers. The working group noted the issues with current salary levels in recruiting and retaining teachers, and expressed the goal that districts be able to pay top-quality teachers more. Melissa Martin, the only teacher on the commission, said she’s torn over performance pay. Martin voiced concern that evaluations are property constructed and not totally subjective, which could introduce campus politics into the process.

The working group included the following additional recommendations:

  • Adjust compensatory education funding (currently $3.9 billion annually) in recognition that “free and reduced lunch” percentages are a very simplistic measure and do not adequately reflect the varying levels of poverty that exist throughout the state.
  • Strongly consider eliminating the five end-of-course (“EOC”) STAAR assessments and replacing with either SAT or ACT assessments that can measure growth based on a pre-SAT/ACT assessment given in 9th grade vs. a SAT/ACT assessment given in the 11th grade.
  • For districts choosing to implement a full day Pre-K program, consider crediting the appropriate full-day attendance for purposes of funding within the Foundation School Program.
  • TEA financially incent dual language strategies and disallow ELL pullout strategies as an accepted approach toward ELL instruction for larger districts exceeding 5,000 students (this subset of districts educates roughly 80% of all Texas students).
  • Align the current CTE weight of 1.35 (equivalent to $2.2 billion annually) toward CTE programs of study that are vigorously tied to the attainment of living wage credentials aligned with current workforce need and/or which provide students with critical financial literacy skills.
  • Amend legislation to require that failing ISD elementary and middle school campuses may be reconstituted after three years with an ACE-like school reconstitution plan (where better educators have been purposely placed at the struggling campus) with the state providing matching funds to reduce district costs.
  • To reduce prison recidivism and its associated costs to the state, TEA should amend the accountability system to incent school districts to help formerly incarcerated individuals receive their high school diploma or GED.
  • State funding should target professional development training towards schools/districts willing to launch blended learning and personalized learning pilots that help students matriculate faster than their peers if necessary, providing net savings in the long run to the state due to paying for less seat time.
  • Schools should be incentivized by the academic accountability system by creating a separate post-secondary readiness academic distinction. In addition, additional state funding should be awarded if the high school achieves the post-secondary readiness academic distinction.

The working group also expressed support for researching the costs associated with providing all-day pre-K for teachers’ children. The report concludes, “For us to succeed requires very substantive, immediate action on the part of the state (emphasis in original document) – we simply cannot “tweak” our K-12 system to meet this critical objective. Only by making strategic, impactful investments above current levels in the key areas noted, and implementing the innovative structural formula changes that are necessary, can we ensure Texas remains a thriving economy that all of its citizens can participate in.”

The recommendations carry an estimated $1 billion annual price tag, which would average out to about $200 per student and a 4 percent increase in the current basic allotment – still below 2008 inflation adjusted funding levels. This would gradually increase to $2.5 billion annually by 2030, which would average out to $450 per student, which would only be achieved if all districts implement performance pay programs. According to the report, this would still place Texas in the lowest quartile of per-student spending compared to other states.

The report argues these measures could pay for themselves by creating up to $4 billion in incremental potential yearly earnings and up to $250 million in additional state sales taxes for each yearly graduating cohort. Better-prepared graduates will earn more money and pay more in taxes. The report suggests success could also reduce growth in the approximate $12 billion the state spends each year in uninsured medical costs and incarceration.

The report, as amended, was approved with a unanimous vote of the five working group members. You can read all of the recommendations in the full draft report from the outcomes working group here, however some of the recommendations were altered or struck in Tuesday’s meeting. This article contains the most up-to-date versions of the recommendations. The full commission meets July 10.

School finance commission touches on early childhood, funding

The Texas Commission on Public School Finance met Thursday morning in Austin to discuss a lengthy agenda covering early childhood education, weights and allotments, and the permanent school fund.

The hearing began with testimony by early childhood education advocates regarding the well-documented benefits of pre-K, including increased kindergarten readiness, improved third grade reading levels, better long-term student performance and fewer behavioral issues. Alexandra Hale with Good Reason Houston suggested assigning more veteran teachers to early childhood education and allowing districts to count the cost of providing full-day pre-K against recapture.

Texas Commission on Public School Finance meeting May 3, 2018.

Commission Chair Scott Brister suggested any investment in early childhood education would have to come at the expense of any potential increase to teacher salaries, and attempted to goad witnesses into arguing against teacher pay raises. Expanding pre-K and paying educators a professional salary are not mutually exclusive goals, and witnesses correctly pointed out that additional funding is needed across the board.

Former U.S. Undersecretary of Education Linus Wright suggested eliminating Grade 12 in order to spend more money on pre-K for three- and four-year olds. Wright contended that the senior year serves no purpose, and 11th graders are equally capable of going to college. It’s important to note many colleges already complain that Texas high school students arrive at the post-secondary level ill-prepared and in need of remediation. Wright also suggested holding elementary teachers to more rigid certification requirements and treating educators as professionals.

Texas Education Agency (TEA) Chief School Finance Officer Leo Lopez next walked the commission through the list of categories that receive weighted funding under the current school finance formula. These include special education, compensatory education, bilingual education, career and technical, gifted and talented, public education grants (PEG) and the high school allotment. In fiscal year 2018, Texas will spend over $10.2 billion, or 28 percent, of total Tier I funds of $37.1 billion on weighted student funding allotments. Compensatory education receives the greatest share of weighted funding, followed by special education and career and technical.

In fiscal year 2018, the total state special education allotment is estimated at over $3 billion. This allotment is distributed according to subordinate weighted funding calculations for different instructional settings. The compensatory education allotment for fiscal year 2018 is estimated at over $4 billion. This primarily consists of funding for economically disadvantaged students weighted at .20, but also includes pregnancy services weighted at 2.41. Compensatory education spending is primarily calculated based on the number of students eligible for the federal free and reduced lunch program. The bilingual allotment for fiscal year 2018 totaled just over $505 million, and covers instructional materials and stipends for teachers.

After a lunch break, the commission returned to hear testimony regarding the Permanent School Fund (PSF) from outgoing State Board of Education (SBOE) Member David Bradley (R-Beaumont), who chairs the SBOE Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund, and TEA Chief Investment Officer Holland Timmins.

The commission is scheduled to meet again June 5, when it hopes to hear from superintendents and principals regarding costly or unfunded mandates. The working group on expenditures is scheduled to meet Friday morning.

Graduation committees advance in House hearing

The House Public Education Committee met Tuesday morning to consider a large agenda of Senate bills as the session winds down. The committee also approved the following bills Tuesday evening:

  • CSSB 463, which was heard earlier in the day. The bill would extend individual graduation committees (IGCs) through 2019.
  • SB 436, the Senate companion to HB 4226, which would require meetings of the Special Education Continuing Advisory Committee to be conducted in compliance with open meetings laws.
  • CSSB 529, the Senate companion to HB 2209, which would incorporate “universal design for learning” into the required training for all classroom teachers.
  • SB 585, the Senate companion to HB 545, which would require principals to allow “patriotic societies” such as Boy Scouts to speak to students about membership at the beginning of the school year.
  • SB 748, the Senate companion to HB 4027, which would add additional guidelines to the transition plan for special education students preparing to leave the public school system.
  • CSSB 1481, the Senate companion to HB 4140, which would rename the instructional materials allotment (IMA) the “instructional materials and technology allotment” and require districts to consider “open education resources” before purchasing instructional materials.
  • SB 1942, the Senate companion to HB 1692, which would allow a licensed handgun owner to store a firearm in a vehicle parked in the parking lot of a public school, open-enrollment charter school or private school. State Reps. Alma Allen (D-Houston) and Joe Deshotel (D-Beaumont) voted against the bill.
  • SB 2080, the Senate companion to HB 69, which would require each school district and open-enrollment charter school to include in the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) report the number of children with disabilities residing in a residential facility who are required to be tracked by the Residential Facility Monitoring (RFM) System and are receiving educational services from the district or school.

The meeting began with SB 1566 by state Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham), which would hand broad powers to local school boards to compel the testimony of district officials and obtain district documents. It would also require the Texas Education Agency (TEA) develop a website for boards to review campus and district academic achievement data.

House Public Education Committee meeting May 16, 2017.

House Public Education Committee meeting May 16, 2017.

SB 2131 by state Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) would add requirements to counseling regarding postsecondary education, encouraging a focus on dual credit programs. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1294 by state Sen. Dawn Buckingham (R-Lakeway) would prohibit “exclusive consultation,” ensuring that educators on campus-level advisory committees do not all belong to a single professional association. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1660 by Sen. Taylor would allow districts to choose between using either minutes or days to calculate operation. According to the fiscal note, SB 1660 could cost the state $1.7 million through the biennium ending August 31, 2019.

SB 195 by state Sen. Sylvia Garcia (D-Houston) would allow additional transportation allotment funding to districts with children living within the two mile zone who are at a high risk of violence if they walk to school. In the fiscal note, the Legislative Budget Board indicated that there is insufficient data regarding the number of students who are at risk of violence to be able to calculate a fiscal impact. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1854 by state Sen. Carlos Uresti (D-San Antonio) would require district-level committees to review paperwork requirements annually and recommend to the board of trustees instructional tasks that can be transferred to non-instructional staff. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 384 by state Sen. Konni Burton (R-Colleyville) would give the State Board of Education (SBOE) flexibility in scheduling end-of-course exams to avoid conflicts with AP/IB national tests.

SB 1883 by Sen. Campbell would modify the approval process for charter applicants and the review of charter operators. ATPE opposes the bill because the removal of elected officials from the charter school process is irresponsible. Adding unnecessary new appeal and review opportunities for charters only creates administrative bloat.

SB 1005 by state Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels) would allow the use of the SAT or the ACT as a secondary exit-level assessment instrument to allow certain public school students to receive a high school diploma. The fiscal note estimates an annual cost of $2 million per year.

SB 1839 by state Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) would create a certification for early childhood through grade three, and would grant the commissioner authority to set reciprocity rules regarding the ability of teachers from outside the state to obtain a certificate in Texas. ATPE believes that the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC), as the official state body charged with the oversight of educator standards, is the more appropriate authority to set these rules.

SB 2270 by Sen. Lucio would create a pilot program in ESC Region 1 to provide additional pre-K funding for low-income students.

SB 1784 by Sen. Taylor would encourage the use of “open-source instructional materials.”

SB 2188 by Sen. Taylor would specify that a student who is 18 or older in an off home campus instructional arrangement is a full-time student if they receive 20 hours of contact a week. Part-time would be defined as between 10 and 20 contact hours per week. According to the fiscal note, SB 2188 would cost roughly $7 million through the next biennium. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 463 by state Sen. Kel Seliger (R-Amarillo) would extend individual graduation committees (IGCs) to 2019 and order the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to compile a report tracking the progress of IGC graduates. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 2039 by state Sen. Judith Zaffirini (D-Laredo) would develop instructional modules and training for public schools on the prevention of sexual abuse and sex trafficking. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1483 by Sen. Taylor would establish a grant program to implement a technology lending program to provide students with electronic instructional materials. The program would be funded through instructional materials fund. The fiscal note anticipates no additional cost, but indicated the commissioner could use up to $25 million of existing funds from the instructional materials fund each biennium.

SB 1398 by Sen. Lucio makes lots of clarifying and limiting changes to the classroom video camera law. Among them, the bill would require requests in writing and only require equipment in classrooms or settings in which the child is in regular attendance or to which the staff member is assigned.

SB 1122 by state Sen. Donald Huffines (R-Dallas) would create a mechanism to abolish Dallas County Schools, one of two remaining county school districts in the state, which primarily provides transportation services to multiple independent school districts in the Dallas area.

SB 1886 by state Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston) would create an office of the inspector general at TEA appointed by the commissioner to prevent and detect criminal activity in districts, charter schools, and education service centers (ESCs). The bill would allow the new TEA inspector general to issue subpoenas in order to secure evidence.

SB 490 by state Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville) would require a report on the number of school counselors at each campus. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1484 by Sen. Taylor would create a web portal and instructional materials repository to assist schools in selecting open education resources. The bill provides for a third party to provide independent analysis regarding TEKS alignment. According to the fiscal note, SB 1484 would not require additional state funding, but would result in an additional cost of $1.85 million in fiscal year 2018 and $450,000 in subsequent years that would be paid from existing instructional materials funding.

SB 1658 by Sen. Taylor would make changes to laws regarding the ownership, sale, lease, and disposition of property and management of assets of an open-enrollment charter school.

SB 2078 by Sen. Taylor would require TEA develop a model multi-hazard emergency operations plan and create a cycle of review. The fiscal note anticipates a fiscal impact of roughly $215,000 per year.

SB 2144 by Sen. Taylor would create a commission to recommend improvements to the public school finance system. ATPE supports this bill.