Tag Archives: PRB

Pension review board discusses recent legislation

The Texas Pension Review Board (PRB) met Thursday, June 27, 2019, in Austin with a focus on reviewing pension-related legislation passed by the 86th Texas Legislature.

Members began by recognizing outgoing Chair Josh McGee, who passes the gavel to new Chair Stephanie Leibe. The PRB governmental relations team then walked the board through a handful of items resulting from the most recent legislative session. The bills include:

  • Senate Bill (SB) 2224 by Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston) requires every public retirement system to adopt a written funding policy that details the system’s plan for achieving a funding ratio equal to or greater than 100 percent. Each plan must be submitted to the system’s sponsor and the PRB.
  • SB 322 by Sen. Huffman relates to the evaluation and reporting of investment practices and the performance of certain public retirement systems. Public retirement systems must now include in their annual financial report information about how much investment managers are being paid, as well as hire an independent firm to evaluate the system’s investment practices.
  • SB 12 by Sen. Huffman relates to contributions into and benefits under the Teacher
    Retirement System of Texas (TRS). This bill increases the annual base employer contribution, supplemental employer contribution, and member contribution rates over a five-year period. Certain retired members will also receive a 13th check this year capped at the lesser of the amount of their monthly TRS annuity check check or $2,000.
  • House Bill (HB) 2763 by Rep. Dan Flynn (R-Canton) relates to the police pension fund in certain municipalities.

The agenda book for the current PRB meeting included additional bills related to pensions, such as HB 3. While the school finance bill does not directly address TRS, PRB staff suggest that a significant increase in the salaries of some educators could affect the financial position of TRS over the short term. You can read the full agenda book for today’s meeting here.

PRB Executive Director Anumeha Kumar also explained the agency’s legislatively approved budget, as well as the revised rule review plan for the board. This plan will lay out the process by which the board will review rules for adoption, revision, or repeal.

Staff indicated that as a result of legislation passed this session, the TRS pension’s amortization period is projected to drop from 87 years to under 30 years. This would meet the minimum requirements for being considered actuarially sound and therefore eligible to provide members a cost of living adjustment (COLA). The plan’s amortization period jumped to 87 from 32 last year as a result of the TRS board’s decision to change actuarial assumptions to reflect more conservative economic forecasts.

TRS is by far the largest active plan under the purview of the PRB, with more than $154 billion in assets. The next largest plan, the Texas County & District Retirement System, is worth $30 billion. The PRB briefly mentioned a new resource that is available for members of the public to see a snapshot of the health of the state’s various public pension plans. The Texas Public Pension Data Center can be found here.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: June 22, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


A full meeting of the Texas Pension Review Board (PRB) was held on Monday, and the body voted to adopt voluntary guidelines designed to work as best practices for how retirement plans are funded. While the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) meets many of the PRB’s voluntary standards, it fails to meet standards in two critical areas that can be crippling to TRS members. Read more about the guidelines in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter.

 


Earlier this month the State Board of Education voted unanimously to adopt curriculum standards for  a high school elective course entitled “Ethnic Studies: Mexican American Studies”. This comes after months of back and forth between members of the board and stakeholders over content and curriculum standards for the course as well as what it should be named. In this commentary, SBOE Chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) reflects on how working together made this course a reality and how that gives her hope, both for the state of Texas and the nation.

 


School may be out, but the fight for Texas public schools is ongoing. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins breaks down the ways you can engage with the legislature and advocate for your profession during the summer in this blog post.

Texas Pension Review Board adopts principles of retirement plan design

A subcommittee of the Texas Pension Review Board (PRB) has been working over the last several months on a set of non-binding guidelines meant to impart what the board feels are best practices with respect to retirement plan design for use by the retirement plans that are required to report to the board.

Despite some concern expressed by smaller funds over how the board’s non-mandatory recommendation on vesting periods might be made into a legal mandate by the Texas Legislature, the full PRB unanimously adopted the proposed principles, which can be found here, at its most recent meeting.

The Texas Teachers Retirement System (TRS) pension fund is one of the many funds, and certainly the largest fund, required to report to the PRB. While the design of the TRS pension fund by and large already meets the voluntary standards enumerated in the PRB’s principles document, the two areas where it does not are notable. First, the principles document calls for “contributions to retirement plans [to] be consistent with the PRB Pension Funding Guidelines.” Those guidelines call for plans to be funded at a level that would allow the plans’ unfunded liability to be amortized over less than 30 years. Second, the PRB principles say that a plan’s “retirement benefits should be protected against the erosion of the benefit’s value due to inflation.” Essentially that means plans should include built in COLAs (Cost of Living Adjustments). In both instances, that the TRS pension plan does not comply with these best practices is a function of the Legislature choosing not to fund the plan adequately.

Perhaps the Legislature and the Governor should take a note from the PRB, a body the legislature created whose chairman the Governor appoints, and fund TRS adequately to comply with the PRB’s newly adopted principles.