Tag Archives: master teacher

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: April 24, 2020

Educators won’t see their classrooms filled with students anytime soon, so “emergency remote learning” and teacher parades will have to suffice in the meantime. Here is a look at this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: As we reported on our blog last week, Gov. Greg Abbott is slowly rolling out plans for a gradual reopening of Texas businesses, with more information expected to come from the governor on April 27. Abbott has ordered schools to remain physically closed through the end of the school year, while allowing educators to access school buildings to carry out their duties. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has shared guidance on entering school buildings, which states that teachers should self-screen, maintain social distancing, and wear a face covering, among other things.

TEA has also added to its website a COVID-19 Support page for Texas educators. This resource page has a more limited scope than TEA’s main coronavirus resource section, focusing on topics of interest to educators, such as certification and evaluation.

The educator support page features new guidance this week for individuals pursuing educator certification, including details on a waiver from Gov. Abbott that allows certain educator certification candidates to apply for a one-year probationary certificate. These candidates will have to complete the fingerprinting process, which – while safer for students – will also cause some hiccups as many fingerprinting locations are closed or have limited appointments. TEA announced last week that out-of-state educators who are on a one-year certificate will receive an automatic one-year extension. Next Friday, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is set to discuss other COVID-19-related educator issues, stay tuned to Teach the Vote and @TeachtheVote on Twitter for coverage. Find the May 1 SBEC agenda here.

As we previously reported, the State Board of Education (SBOE) briefly discussed funding concerns associated with COVID-19, a thought that is on the minds of many educators. ATPE is monitoring the Texas economy and has taken action by sending a joint letter to TEA Commissioner Mike Morath requesting the suspension of charter school expansions during this pandemic. Current charter expansions could cost the state $90 million dollars at a time when state agencies and other public institutions foresee budget cuts on the horizon. ATPE has not received a reply to this request, though there was affirmation at the SBOE meeting that TEA would provide a response.

ATPE also hopes to hear back from the commissioner on our request for statewide action in the application of educator appraisals. Several other states have suspended appraisals, while others, like Texas, have left the decision up to individual school districts. Many educators have expressed that they feel like first-year teachers again and some say they haven’t heard from certain students since they last saw them in school. While feedback is essential for professional growth, this unique situation is likely to yield unfair and invalid appraisal results.

For more resources related to the pandemic, visit ATPE’s Coronavirus FAQ and Resources page for frequently updated information for educators, and follow the ATPE lobby team via @TeachtheVote on Twitter for the latest legislative and regulatory news. Also, keep reading below for updates on federal developments pertaining to COVID-19.


FEDERAL UPDATE: More COVID-19 developments at the federal level occurred this week as the U.S. Department of Education (ED) released the long-awaited application for Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Act funding. The CARES Act provides waivers of various federal laws and $13.5 billion in education-dedicated funding, 90% of which is divvied up through Title I formulas. According to the Learning Policy Institute, Texas is expected to receive on average $264 per pupil for a total of over $1.4 billion dollars from the CARES Act. This amount includes the Texas portion of the $13.5 billion and assumes half of the Texas portion of the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) Fund, which could send over $307 million to Texas, will go to PK-12 with the other half going to higher education. Without any additional federal funding, a statewide cut to education of just 6% would zap the boost from the CARES Act. Texas has also been approved for federal spending waivers, which will allow districts to move federal funds around more freely to address new expenditures and potential shortfalls in the future (though this will not solve overall cuts).

Congress also passed a fourth coronavirus aid package this week, which sends hundreds of billions of dollars to small businesses and provides assistance for hospitals and COVID-19 testing needs. For more information about how the other coronavirus aid packages impact you, including paid family/sick leave and cash rebates, visit ATPE’s Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) page here and the CARES Act page here.


ELECTION UPDATE: With Texas’ July 14 primary runoff elections on the horizon, many Texans are contemplating the safety of voting in person. The option of mail-in voting, while recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), has become a partisan issue. Ruling on one of two lawsuits filed by the Texas Democratic Party, a Texas district judge sided with voters last week by effectively allowing all Texans to vote by mail. This decision is expected to be appealed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, who has already refuted the arguments used by the district judge. Do you think all Texans should be allowed to vote by mail? Read more in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Related: This year’s state legislative elections have even more significance with redistricting on the horizon. The 87th Texas Legislature is set to redraw district boundaries during the 2021 legislative session that begins in January. That’s why it’s important for Texans to respond to the 2020 U.S. Census. Talk to everyone you can about completing the census online, especially if they have small children. The census is crucial for funding public schools and informing redistricting decisions next year. Learn more about the 2020 Census and find FAQs here.


Master Teacher certification was eliminated last year as part of House Bill (HB) 3 passed by the 86th Texas legislature, reportedly to avoid avoid naming confusion with the “master teacher” designation in the new Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA) program. This has left Master Teachers wondering if they can keep their current teaching assignments once their certificates expire. The ATPE lobby team has been working on this issue with state leaders to find a solution and has made significant progress. Read more in this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


ATPE member and award-winning, 17-year teaching veteran Amy McKee of Leander ISD planned to have her annual show week for her dance students this week. McKee’s spring show is the culmination of months of hard work, growth, and team spirit, and is an emotional capstone for seniors who ceremoniously hang up their uniform hats at the end of the show. Not about to let her students miss out on the joys of show week, McKee put her creative skills to work and curated a series of special, “socially-distanced” events to honor her students.

Thank you to all educators who are transitioning to the unique needs of students during this time! #TeachersCan

Do you have a story to tell? ATPE wants to hear how you are adapting to a new educational environment during the coronavirus pandemic. Click here to email us your stories, best practices for distance learning, or strategies you’re using to stay upbeat during the crisis.

ATPE continues advocacy for Master Teacher fix

While it is not uncommon for Texas teaching certificates to come and go as they keep up with the needs of an evolving education system, the legislature’s abrupt decision in 2019 to eliminate prestigious Master Teacher certificates caught many by surprise. To address this issue, ATPE’s lobbyists have been working diligently with state leaders and officials to ensure that the expertise and value of Master Teacher certificate holders is upheld.

Under House Bill (HB) 3 passed by the 86th Texas legislature in 2019, Master Teacher certificates can no longer be issued or renewed, effective September 1, 2019. The bill also repealed the authorizing statutes for those Master Teacher certificates, which were offered in Reading, Mathematics, Science, and Technology, essentially wiping them from existence. Master Teacher certificate holders will now find their certificates marked with a “legacy” notation, as designated by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC).

This change has left many of our state’s nearly 5,000 Master Teachers perplexed as to the status of their certificates and their teaching assignment prospects. Once their Master Teacher certificate expires, will they be able to continue teaching in their current position? Take the popular Master Reading Teacher certificate as an example (82% of Master Teachers hold this certificate). First issued in 2001, this certificate was designed for those who wanted to go above and beyond – only obtainable by educators who had already been teaching on a standard certificate. Because the certificate is EC-12, in some cases it allows an educator to obtain a teaching assignment for which they wouldn’t otherwise be eligible if they held only their underlying standard certificate. Teachers in this situation who want to maintain their current assignments must either pay to take a test for earning an appropriate credential, request permission to remain in their assignment on an expired certificate, or find another job.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies before SBEC, Dec. 6, 2019

ATPE has been working with SBEC, the Texas Education Agency (TEA), members of the legislature, and state leaders to remedy this issue for several months. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier submitted written testimony at an SBEC meeting on October 4, 2019, written and oral testimony at the December 6, 2019 SBEC meeting, and written and oral testimony at the February 21, 2020 SBEC meeting. ATPE also submitted public comments on the rule review of Chapter 239, Student Services Certificates, which is where the original Master Teacher certificates were housed in the Texas Administrative Code.

These efforts have led to important developments, including a letter of intent being shared by House Public Education Committee chairman and HB 3 author Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) and a decision to add a discussion item to the agenda for an upcoming SBEC meeting on May 1, 2020, aimed at finding solutions to the Master Teacher issue. (The May 1 SBEC meeting starts at 8:30 a.m. and will be broadcast here. ATPE will also provide updates on the meeting here on our Teach the Vote blog.)

In unexpectedly dramatic fashion, Chairman Huberty’s letter in response to ATPE’s advocacy was delivered into SBEC members’ hands as ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier was delivering her testimony on the Master Teachers issue during the February SBEC meeting. The letter stated that the intent of the elimination of the Master Teacher certificates was to avoid naming confusion with the newly created “master teacher” designations under the state’s new Teacher Incentive Allotment, also included in HB 3.

“Our intent was never to abandon the expertise of these highly trained educators,” Huberty wrote in the letter. “Holders of legacy master teacher certificates should be entitled to maintain their existing assignments without interruption, additional cost, or the need to seek additional certifications.”

Responding to the requests from ATPE and the letter from Chairman Huberty, SBEC members voted to create a separate agenda item for the May SBEC meeting to discuss options for Master Teacher certificate holders. ATPE has also sent a letter letter to Gov. Greg Abbott expressing our appreciation for his interest in the issue.

Master Teacher certificate holders underwent time-intensive, rigorous, and often costly educator preparation programs in order to receive this extra credential. Their roles are content-specific and include teacher mentoring duties as they support the other professionals on their campus. Master Teachers are also highly educated, with 67% having either a master’s or doctorate degree. In many cases, the Master Teacher certificates (especially the Master Reading Teacher certificate) are highly prized, and at least in the early days of the certificate, were accompanied by stipends. Furthermore, Master Reading Teachers’ focus on literacy is crucial to the reading success of the state and is directly related to many of the aims of HB 3.

As this issue progresses, ATPE will continue to work carefully to preserve the hard work and expertise of Master Teacher certificate holders and share updates here on our advocacy blog.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Feb. 21, 2020

It’s the first week of early voting in Texas! Whether you’ve already voted or are making your plan to vote by March 3, stay up-to-date on the latest education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


ELECTION UPDATE: Early voting for the 2020 Texas primary election started this week on February 18, which was also Educator Voting Day. Many counties saw record numbers of voters at the polls on Tuesday. The early voting period ends February 28 and Texas’s primary elections on “Super Tuesday” will be March 3, 2020. If you haven’t made it out to the polls yet, be sure to get the scoop on voting procedures and reminders! (Doesn’t that make you want ice-cream?) Also, check out the latest “Texas election roundup” blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins here.

Why vote in the primaries? ATPE’s lobbyists explained why it’s so important in this “Primary Colors” blog series for Teach the Vote. In many cases, the winning candidate is chosen in the primary rather than in the November general election, as ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell described in Part I of the series (with a list of affected races). In  Part II of “Primary Colors,” ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins explains that for educators who face imminent attacks, it is imperative to show up at the polls and make informed choices so that the next legislative session is as positive as our last.

Read up on the people running for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education this year by viewing their candidate profiles on Teach the Vote, which include responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey. ATPE does not endorse candidates and invites all candidates to participate in our survey project for Teach the Vote. If your favorite candidate has not answered our survey, please let them know it’s not too late! Encourage them to contact ATPE Governmental Relations for additional details.

 

  • Watch this instructional video to learn the different ways you can search for candidate information using Teach the Vote.
  • Learn about the non-binding ballot propositions proposed by the state Democratic and Republican parties that will appear on the primary ballot. These measures don’t affect the law, but they help state party leaders learn more about their voters’ opinions on key issues. Check out this Teach the Vote blog post for more information.
  • Read all the fantastic election features in our latest issue of ATPE News for Spring 2020.
  • Use Vote411.org to build a customized ballot that you can print out and take with you to the polls.
  • Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com to find additional election-related resources created for educators.
  • Find additional election reminders and tips on ATPE’s main blog at atpe.org.

This week, Senator Kirk Watson (D-Austin) announced his plans to resign from the Texas Senate in order to become dean of the University of Houston’s new Hobby School of Public Affairs. Watson has served in the state legislature since being elected to office in 2006, and he was a key member of the Senate Education Committee during the 2019 legislative session. Senator Watson served as mayor of Austin before setting his sights on the legislature. The race to succeed Watson could draw a number of high-profile contenders from the Austin area. State Reps. Donna Howard (D-Austin) and Celia Israel (D-Austin) each indicated this week they are not interested in running for the seat, which is in an overwhelmingly Democratic district. Gov. Greg Abbott will be required to call a special election in order to fill the Senate District 14 vacancy, which could be held on the uniform election dates in May or November of this year.


Two polls of note were released this week that show voter support for public education. A University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll found that Texas voters want increased spending for public education, and lower property taxes, and they believe the quality of Texas public education is excellent or good. Another statewide poll, commissioned by the education-focused non-profit Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation showed that 77% of Texans express trust and confidence in their teachers. Those polled also believe that teacher quality is extremely or very important in overall school quality, teachers are undervalued, teacher pay is too low, standardized tests may not be the best measure of student learning, and public schools have too little money.

These two new Texas polls are consistent with another recent national poll conducted by the National School Boards Action Center, (NSBAC) which we reported on last week. In the NSBAC poll, 64% of the respondents said funding for public schools should be increased, 73% were opposed to public spending on private, religious, and home schools, and 80% expressed favorable opinions of the teachers in their community.


ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified at the Feb. 21, 2020, SBEC meeting.

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today in Austin for its first meeting of the year. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified to urge the board to use its authority to remedy an unforeseen impact of House Bill (HB) 3 on former Master Teacher certificate holders. Under the bill’s repeal of the Master Teacher certificates, Master Teachers will no longer be able to renew their certificates and may face tricky situations trying to keep their current teaching assignments as a result. HB 3 author Rep. Dan Huberty also sent a letter to the board asking for their help in preserving the classroom expertise of Master Teachers.

Read complete details of the meeting in this comprehensive blog post from Chevalier.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) of Texas Board of Trustees also met this week in Austin, and ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter covered the meetings. Hot topics of discussion at the meetings on Thursday and Friday, February 20-21, 2020, included healthcare for active and retired educators and plans for relocating the TRS agency staff.

Read Exter’s latest blog post for Teach the Vote here for highlights of the meeting.


Highlights of the Feb. 2020 SBEC meeting

At their first meeting of the year, the certification board discussed rule changes to implement recently passed legislation, enact numerous technical updates, and approve new supplemental certifications in special education and bilingual education.

On Friday, February 21, 2020, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met for the first time this year and for the first time under the leadership of new Chairperson Dr. Arturo Cavazos (Superintendent of Harlingen CISD). The board discussed several agenda items, including allowing high school students to obtain the educational aide certificate, changes to contract abandonment rules, and educator preparation program (EPP) commendations.

Master Teachers

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified before SBEC on Feb. 21, 2020.

On Friday, SBEC adopted the standard, four-year rule review of 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 239, Student Services Certificates, voting to continue the existence of the chapter without changes. Chapter 239 specifies rules pertaining to the school counselor, school librarian, educational diagnostician, and reading specialist certificates. This chapter formerly housed the rules for the Master Teacher certificates, which were repealed by House Bill (HB) 3 of the 86th Legislature (2019). Master Teacher certificate holders will now find a “legacy” designation on their certificates and an expiration date five years from their last renewal. Unfortunately, these “legacy” certificates are non-renewable, which will leave some teachers unable to maintain their current teaching assignments.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier provided written and oral testimony today urging SBEC to exercise its authority to remedy this situation, specifically through the creation of new certificates that Master Teachers can transition into without having to pay additional fees. (See Andrea’s testimony here at 1:07:00 into the video.) ATPE previously submitted written testimony to the board on this topic at the October 2019 SBEC meeting, written and oral testimony at the December 2019 SBEC meeting, and submitted public comment to SBEC on the rule review earlier this month.

Rep. Dan Huberty addressed the Texas House during final passage of his House Bill 3 in May 2019.

Ahead of today’s meeting, Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), who chairs the House Public Education Committee and authored HB 3, also sent a letter to SBEC members at ATPE’s request to clarify legislative intent behind the bill’s elimination of the Master Teacher certification statutes. Chairman Huberty wrote, “Our intent was never to abandon the expertise of these highly trained educators…. Holders of legacy master teacher certificates should be entitled to maintain their existing assignments without interruption, additional cost, or the need to seek additional certifications.”

Ultimately, the board agreed to allow TEA to present them with options to address the Master Teacher issue at the next SBEC meeting in May.

Other action items on the agenda:

The SBEC board adopted several changes to professional educator preparation and certification rules in 19 TAC Chapter 230. The rules will implement several bills by making changes such as removing master teacher certificates from the list of active certifications, reducing the time for certification test retakes from 45 to 30 days, and specifying that the Early Childhood: Prekindergarten-Grade 3 certificate cannot be obtained via certification by exam. Other changes will require candidates taking the intensive pre-service route to take the English as a Second Language Supplemental assessment before being issued an intern certificate and require requests for certificate corrections to be submitted within six weeks of the original date of issuance.

ATPE is pleased with a change in this chapter to allow the Educational Aide I certificate to be issued to high school students who have completed certain courses within the Education and Training career and technical education cluster. See the public comment ATPE previously submitted in support of this change here. TEA staff made some last minute changes to this item, including a delay on the implementation of testing changes to comply with HB 3 regarding the requirement to take the science of teaching reading exam. Staff said they will propose entirely new certificate names, such as “EC-3 Core Subjects with Science of Teaching Reading”.

SBEC also adopted revisions to general certification provisions and professional development rules in 19 TAC Chapter 232 to implement several bills passed by the 86th Legislature in 2019. These include continuing professional education instruction regarding mental health and substance abuse training (HB 18 and SB 11); training requirements for superintendents regarding sexual abuse and human trafficking (HB 403); and the removal of student loan default as grounds to deny the renewal of a certificate (SB 37). Edits will also be made to the National Criminal History Record process to update the rule with current technology and TEA practice. The chapter will also be simplified and reorganized as suggested by ATPE and other stakeholders.

The board took several actions relating to educator preparation programs (EPPs), including the approval of accreditation statuses under the 2018-19 Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP). Sixty percent of EPPs have an accredited status, 20% are accredited-warned, and 20% are on an accredited-probation status. SBEC also approved proposed 2018–19 commendations for EPPs, which complement the ASEP system by highlighting high-performing EPPs in three categories with indicators such as teacher retention and percentage of prepared teachers in shortage areas. Prairie View A&M University, Texas A&M International University, Baylor University, Austin Community College, and McClennan Community College all appear in the commendations multiple times, among others. The board voted to create a committee to review and evaluate EPP applications for a fourth category relating to innovative educator preparation, to be chaired by SBEC member Jose Rodriguez and include members Laurie Bricker, Shareefah Mason, and John Kelly. Lastly, the board approved an agreed order to close Intern Teacher ACP Alternative Certification Program, which decided to voluntarily close after lack of compliance with administrative rules.

SBEC also voted to formalize an already informal policy that non-voting members of the board may not make or second motions and may not serve as officers. The non-voting members of the board are an employee of TEA, and employee of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, a dean of a college of education, and a person representing an alternative certification program.

Discussion only agenda items (no action taken):

At the July, October, and December 2019 SBEC meetings, the board discussed potential changes to contract abandonment rules for educators. After disagreements surfaced between stakeholders and board members, the board voted to split contract abandonment off from other rules being revised, saving it for future discussion after stakeholder meetings (in which ATPE was involved). Today, the board discussed proposed revisions that would add “change to a position that requires a new class of educator certification” (such as moving from teacher to counselor) to the definition of good cause for contract abandonment. Additionally, the changes would cross-reference the mitigating factors that the SBEC considers when evaluating a contract abandonment case. After several witnesses from both the teacher and administrator perspective shared their feedback on the proposed language, the board seemed to reach a near-consensus that the contract abandonment rules did not need to be altered.

The board also discussed proposed revisions to requirements for EPPs (19 TAC Chapter 228). The changes would simplify a table of requirements in the chapter; implement portions of HB 18 passed by the Legislature in 2019; authorize teaching sites outside of Texas under certain situations such as military assignment; provide admittance policy guidance to EPPs that are closing or consolidating; restrict a summer-only practicum unless it is part of a year-round school or extended year program; add language for a dismissal policy for candidates who violate the code of ethics; provide concise reasons that an EPP would no longer support a candidate in an internship; and clarify the number (three) and spacing of formal observations conducted during a practicum.

SBEC also discussed changes to certificate standards (19 TAC Chapter 235), including a TEA-recommended split certification for special education, with separate certificates for grades EC-6 and 6-12. TEA staff also presented information on two sets of supplemental certificate standards: one for bilingual Spanish, grades EC-12, that focuses on bilingualism, biliteracy, and biculturalism; and another for “DeafBlind” grades EC-12. The proposals reflect input from stakeholders in the bilingual and special education communities and from an April 2019 SBEC work group meeting.

TEA also updated the board on the EdTPA performance assessment pilot. Thirty-five applications have been submitted for Year Two of the pilot, including 16 from alternative certification programs. Two programs participating in Year One have submitted portfolios already and the rest of programs will submit theirs in the spring. Dr. Christina Ellis of Sam Houston State University gave an update on the T-TESS-based alternative pilot to the EdTPA pilot, stating that 13 EPPs are participating. Additionally, TEA staff updated SBEC on certification test development, stating that development of new health and physical education tests is delayed due to the State Board of Education’s (SBOE) work on revamping the standards.

In a final item, the board discussed proposed amendments to the criteria for personnel assignments (19 TAC Chapter 231) to add the word “legacy” to all master teacher certificate references and include new courses approved by the SBOE such as African-American studies.

Future meetings:

The upcoming SBEC meeting dates for 2020 are:

  • May 1, 2020
  • July 24, 2020
  • Oct. 9, 2020
  • Dec. 11, 2020

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Dec. 13, 2019

Gearing up for the holidays? Take a break from shopping to catch up on this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


ELECTION UPDATE: The candidate filing period has ended, bringing us one step closer to the Texas primary elections on March 3, 2020. The deadline to register to vote in one of the primaries is Feb. 3, 2020! Check your voter registration status here. Read more of the latest election news in this week’s election roundup blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins here.

If you live in House District 28, 100, or 148, don’t forget that you’ve also got a special election runoff coming up on Jan. 28, 2020. Early voting begins Tuesday, Jan. 21. If you are registered to vote in one of these districts, you may vote in the runoff regardless of whether you voted in the original special election in November. The deadline to register to vote in that special election runoff is Dec. 29, 2019.

Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com to get involved, find activities you can do to drive more participation in elections, and sign up for voting updates. Also, be sure to check out your state legislators’ profiles on our Teach the Vote website to find out how they voted on education bills in 2019. Read our recent blog posts to learn more about which education bills are featured and takeaways for using the record votes featured on our site. Teach the Vote will soon include profiles of all the candidates vying for seats in the Texas Legislature and State Board of Education.


Reps. Steve Allison and Ernest Bailes chat with ATPE’s Shannon Holmes on Dec. 12, 2019

A group of educators gathered near Austin this week at the Texas Association of Midsized Schools (TAMS) annual conference. Attendees heard from legislators and education advocates on a number of important topics including school funding, accountability, and educator retirement issues.

ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes moderated a conversation about teacher pay in the wake of this year’s passage of House Bill 3. The teacher compensation panel featured state representatives Steve Allison (R-Alamo Heights) and Ernest Bailes (R-Shepard). House Public Education Committee chairman Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) and Senate Education Committee chairman Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood) also participated in a panel during the conference.


The preliminary results of ATPE’s “Your Voice” survey are starting to take shape. Our members are telling us that standardized testing is their number one policy priority. Want to chime in? You still have time to participate in this short, three-question survey, which is meant to gather ATPE members’ opinions on education issues, including results of the last legislative session. ATPE members are encouraged to take our “Your Voice” survey on ATPE’s Advocacy Central. Call the ATPE Member Services department at (800) 777-2873 if you need help logging into Advocacy Central.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) Board of Trustees met in Austin for the last time this year on Thursday and Friday of this week. The board contemplated space planning needs for the TRS agency, reviewed a recent actuarial valuation of the TRS Pension Trust Fund, and discussed a funding policy. For more detail, check out this teaser post from ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter and check back on Teach the Vote next week for a full summary of this week’s TRS meetings.


Last Friday, Dec. 6, 2019, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) held its final meeting of the year. The board discussed several items, including new teacher and principal surveys, enabling high school students to become certified as educational aides, and other changes to implement bills from recent legislative sessions. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified at the meeting asking the board to help Master Reading Teachers retain their teaching assignments once their Legacy Master Teacher certificates expire under HB 3. Read a full meeting summary in this blog post and watch video of ATPE’s testimony here (located at the 41:00 mark on the archived broadcast).


A new report by the Center for American Progress describes the nationwide trend of declining enrollment and completion in educator preparation programs. The authors dive into Texas and California specifically to explain two different approaches to this issue. In Texas, enrollment has increased due to the proliferation of alternative certification programs, while completion has declined. Read an analysis of the report by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier here.

Recap of the Dec. 2019 SBEC meeting

Certification board discusses educational aide certificates, teacher and principal survey data, and more at the fifth and final SBEC meeting of 2019.

Last Friday, Dec. 6, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met for the last time this year. The board discussed several agenda items, including reader teacher certifications, allowing high school students to obtain the educational aide certificate, an update on various educator certification statistics, and the latest on the EdTPA and T-TESS pilots. The board also elected a new Chairperson, Dr. Arturo Cavazos (Superintendent of Harlingen CISD), Vice-Chairperson, Rohanna Brooks-Sykes, a counselor in Klein ISD, and Secretary, Jose Rodriguez, an elementary school teacher in Leander ISD.

Master Reading Teachers

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified before SBEC on Dec. 6, 2019

The board is undertaking a standard, four-year rule review of 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 239, Student Services Certificates. These rules pertain to the school counselor, school librarian, educational diagnostician, and reading specialist certificates. Under House Bill (HB) 3 of the 86th Legislature, the Master Reading Teacher (MRT) certification was repealed and replaced with a “Legacy Master Teacher” designation. For affected teachers, the Legacy designation will disappear when their existing Master Teacher certificate expires, leaving some teachers unable to maintain their current teaching assignments.

ATPE is urging SBEC to honor the work that MRT certificate holders have accomplished by allowing them to transition over to the Reading Specialist certificate, which has identical teaching assignments. ATPE previously submitted written testimony to the board on this topic at its October SBEC meeting. At Friday’s meeting, ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier again provided written and oral testimony (watch archived video here at the 41:00 mark) in support of MRTs who may be negatively affected by this aspect of HB 3 and the elimination of their certificate.

Potential changes to the language in these SBEC rules will be acted upon at a future meeting. The board will accept public comments on this topic from Jan. 3 to Feb. 3, 2020, through the Texas Register. Additionally, interested educators can testify or submit written comments to the board at its next meeting on Feb. 21, 2020. (Witnesses must submit comments or register to testify at least 48 hours before the meeting.)

Other action items on the agenda:

The board voted to amend disciplinary rules contained in 19 TAC Chapter 249, implementing several educator misconduct bills passed during the 2019 legislative session, including Senate Bill (SB) 1230, SB 1476, and HB 3, as well as SB 37, which eliminates student loan default as a ground for SBEC discipline. This agenda item originally included proposed rule changes to allow SBEC to deny certification to someone who had abandoned a contract within the preceding 12 months. The proposed amendment sought to address intern and probationary certificate holders who abandon their contracts before SBEC can take disciplinary action against them, since their certificates are only valid for one year. The board voted to postpone discussing the contract abandonment language until after a planned stakeholder meeting in January, which ATPE will attend.

The board also adopted the required four-year rule review for two more sets of SBEC rules: 9 TAC Chapter 232, General Certification Provisions, which regulates certificate renewal, continuing education, and criminal history records; and 19 TAC Chapter 230, Professional Educator Preparation and Certification, which deals with procedures for issuing certificates and permits, testing requirements and fees, and the types and classes of certificates issued by the board.

In a separate agenda item, the board amended 19 TAC Chapter 230 to implement SB 1839, HB 2039, and HB 3349 (85th Legislature), plus HB 3 (86th Legislature). The changes include reducing  the time for certification test retakes from 45 to 30 days, and requiring candidates to take the English as a Second Language Supplemental assessment for issuance of an intern certificate obtained through the intensive pre-service route. ATPE is pleased with a change in this chapter to allow the Educational Aide I certificate to be issued to high school students who have completed certain courses within the Education and Training career and technical education cluster. Other changes include the addition of the Early Childhood: Prekindergarten-Grade 3 certificate to the list of certificates that cannot be obtained via certification by exam.

The board also took several actions relating to EPPs, including the approval of the accreditation statuses of 10 programs. Additionally, the board approved a request by East Texas Baptist University to offer the School Counselor class of certificate. Two programs, South Texas Transition to Teaching Alternative Certification (STTT) Preparation Program and Teaching via E-Learning (TEACH) Alternative Certification, were approved to continue to operate with conditions following SBEC orders to improve their programs due to inadequate performance. The board also approved the continuing approval review and lifted the board orders from August 2015 for TeacherBuilder.com Alternative Certification Educator Preparation Program.

Discussion only agenda items (no action taken):

The board discussed several possible future revisions to 19 TAC Chapter 228, which covers requirements for EPPs. The revisions would simplify a table of requirements in the chapter; implement portions of HB 18 of the 86th Legislature; authorize teaching sites outside of Texas under certain situations such as military assignment; provide admittance policy guidance to EPPs that are closing or consolidating; restrict a summer-only practicum unless it is part of a year-round school or extended year program; add language for a dismissal policy for candidates who violate the code of ethics; provide concise reasons that an EPP would no longer support a candidate in an internship; and clarify the number (three) and spacing of the formal observations conducted during a practicum.

Later in the afternoon, the board discussed possible amendments to 19 TAC Chapter 235 on certificate standards, including a TEA-recommended split certification for special education, with separate certificates for EC-5 and 6-12. TEA staff also presented information on two supplemental certificate sets of standards: one for bilingual Spanish, grades EC-12 that focuses on bilingualism, biliteracy, and biculturalism; and another for “DeafBlind” grades EC-12. The proposals reflect input from stakeholders in the bilingual and special education communities and from an April 2019 SBEC work group meeting.

TEA also updated the board on the EdTPA performance assessment pilot, which is almost halfway through its first year. In November, 34 candidates submitted their portfolios. Thirty-two applications have been submitted for the second year of the pilot, including 15 from alternative certification programs. Dr. Stacey Edmonson, Dean of the College of Education at Sam Houston State University, is directing an alternative pilot to the EdTPA pilot that is based on the T-TESS. The pilot attempts to use the T-TESS as a performance assessment tool.

Finally, the board discussed proposed revisions to 19 TAC Chapter 232 on general certification provisions and professional development, which would implement several bills passed by the 86th Legislature. These include continuing professional education instruction regarding mental health and substance abuse training (HB 18 and SB 11); training requirements for superintendents regarding sexual abuse and human trafficking (HB 403); and the removal of student loan default as grounds to deny the renewal of a certificate (SB 37). The chapter would also be simplified and reorganized as suggested by ATPE and other stakeholders.

Facts and figures:

Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff updated the board on Texas educator certification statistics from fiscal year (FY) 2018 (September 1, 2017 to August 31, 2018) to FY 2019 (September 1, 2018 to August 31, 2019). Of note, the number of standard certificates issued increased from 67,748 to 85,708. Nearly half (49%) of all initial teacher certificates issued are through alternative certification programs. The percentage of EPPs accredited as warned or on probation greatly increased, from 5.1% to 27.6% and 5.1% to 13.4%, respectively. This increase is due to additional ASEP standards becoming operational. As for educator leadership and quality, most legal cases opened were due to contract abandonment, the number of which increased by 124% from 111 up to 249 in FY 19.

TEA staff also updated the board on the results of the 2018-19 principal survey of first-year teachers and new teacher survey, which are part of the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP). The survey results show that principals find their first-year teachers from alternative certification programs to be the least prepared. Similarly, new teachers from alternative certification programs indicated they felt the least prepared. Forty-nine percent of new teachers in 2019 were prepared in alternative certification programs, compared to 32 percent from traditional, undergraduate programs.

Additionally, TEA updated the board at its request on educator testing data. The data show that pass rates even into the third test attempt can be quite low. A representative from an EPP suggested that programs be given more time to remediate candidates who cannot pass tests.

Future meetings:

Mark your calendars! The approved SBEC meeting dates for 2020 are:

  • Feb. 21, 2020
  • May 1, 2020
  • July 24, 2020
  • Oct. 9, 2020
  • Dec. 11, 2020

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Oct. 4, 2019

It’s been a busy week for the ATPE Governmental Relations team. Here’s a look at our lobbyists’ latest reporting for Teach the Vote:


Today, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met in Austin to discuss several items that would implement legislation passed by the 86th legislature earlier this year. These include the repeal of the Master Teacher certificate as required by House Bill 3, regulations pertaining to educator misconduct and reporting requirements, and new rules to allow military spouses licensed in other states to teach in Texas. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier submitted written testimony to encourage the board to explore options for Master Teacher certificate holders, so that they can maintain their current teaching assignments once their certificates expire. ATPE also testified in support of expanded criteria for considering “good cause” in determining potential sanctions against educators who abandon their contracts. Additionally, ATPE joined the board in mourning the loss of board member Dr. Rex Peebles, who passed away last week. Watch our blog here on Teach the Vote early next week for a full recap of the meeting.


ELECTION UPDATE: In this week’s election roundup post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins, read the latest announcements on the “who, what, and where” of various contested races on the 2020 ballot, including a retirement announcement from a member of the State Board of Education. Check out the full post here. Also, don’t forget to register by Monday, Oct. 7, if you want to vote in the Nov. 5 election. Voters statewide will be considering proposed constitutional amendments that day, and a few districts have an opportunity to elect new state representatives.

On our Teach the Vote blog this week, we’re also taking a closer look at the special election for House District 28 in the western suburbs of Houston. ATPE’s Wiggins shares information about the education stances of the candidates and why the race is drawing widespread attention. Check it out here.


ATPE continues its Teach the Vote blog series, “New School Year, New Laws,” with a post this week on professional responsibilities. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier highlights bills passed in 2019 that relate to educator misconduct and new records retention requirements that could affect educators who store school-related information on their personal cell phones or other devices. Read the latest post in the series here.


This week’s latest video from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) in its “HB 3 in 30” series offers an explanation of the state’s new teacher incentive allotment. The incentive pay plan was one of the most hotly debated aspects of the school finance bill when it moved through the legislative process earlier this year. After ATPE and other stakeholders urged the legislature to reject earlier versions of the bill that relied too heavily on student test score data in setting the criteria for merit pay, legislators struck a deal late in the session that would offer school districts more flexibility.

Parameters of the new incentive program are spelled out in Texas Education Code (TEC), Sec. 48.112, offering school districts additional funding based upon their employment of educators designated as “recognized,” “exemplary,” or “master” teachers. Lawmakers prescribed some requirements for educators to become eligible for those merit designations in TEC Sec. 21.3521. HB 3 calls for school districts that participate in the incentive program to create a “Local Optional Teacher Designation System” containing specific criteria that each district will use to award the merit designations, but the bill also authorizes the commissioner of education to establish performance standards for those local systems.

This week, TEA issued correspondence to school administrators outlining the agency’s plans for implementation of the new teacher incentive program, sharing timelines, and providing additional resources. TEA also sent school districts and open-enrollment charter schools a survey this week, which solicits information on what type of student growth measures and other criteria are being used locally for teacher appraisals. The survey results will help guide the agency’s implementation of the Local Optional Teacher Designation System, including the commissioner’s adoption of those performance standards required by HB 3.

It is important to note that the Local Optional Teacher Designation System associated with the  allotment is only “optional” in the sense that a school district does not have to choose to seek the teacher incentive funds made available under HB 3. However, any district that does pursue funding through the teacher incentive allotment in the spring of 2020 is required to develop a Local Optional Teacher Designation System. The locally-developed designation systems “must include teacher observation and the performance of a teacher’s students,” along with any additional measures that are adopted locally,” such as evidence of teacher leadership or student surveys,” as noted in the TEA correspondence this week. HB 3 specifies that the criteria for awarding a designation must allow for the mathematical possibility that all eligible teachers may earn the designation (in other words, not limiting eligibility to a fixed percentage of the district’s teachers) and that the commissioner may not require districts to use STAAR tests to evaluate their teachers’ performance for purposes of the merit pay program.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) will face a sunset review in the next legislative session. Under state law, the sunset review process gives the legislature an opportunity to routinely examine the work of various state agencies and determine whether they should continue to exist. TRS is a constitutionally-mandated agency, which means it is not subject to potential closure through the sunset review process, but the review allows an opportunity for the legislature to consider recommended changes to various TRS-related laws. Before the legislature weighs in on TRS next session, the state’s Sunset Advisory Commission will gather data, take testimony at public hearings, and compile a detailed written report about TRS including recommendations for possible legislative changes affecting the agency. Between now and Dec. 6, 2019, members of the public may share their feedback about TRS with the Sunset Advisory Commission’s staff as they prepare their report. Read more about the TRS sunset review here.


In case you missed it, ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter took to our Teach the Vote blog this week to share highlights from the Texas Tribune Festival. The festival that took place last weekend in Austin featured a number of high-profile speakers and panelists. Read more about some of the sessions relating to public education in this blog post.


 

Summary of SBEC’s meeting on July 26, 2019

On Friday, July 26, 2019, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met in Austin to take up a lengthy agenda that included approving rules to implement the EdTPA pilot program and discussing implementation of bills passed by the 86th Legislature, such as House Bill (HB) 3.

First, a note about SBEC procedure. Each agenda item that makes changes to rules takes three board meetings to move through SBEC. The board first brings up an item for discussion only, then formally proposes the rule at its next meeting and allows for a public comment period, and then finally adopts the rule at the third meeting. Additionally, under state law all adopted SBEC rules are subject to review by the elected State Board of Education (SBOE), which can take no action or veto a rule.

On Friday, SBEC approved two standard four-year rule reviews. The review of Title 19 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 233, which establishes the certificate classes for classroom teachers (e.g. 4-8 Science, Music EC-12, etc.), and the review of 19 TAC Chapter 244, which outlines the qualifications, training, and acceptable criteria for educator appraisers, were approved.

The board also adopted items that will now make their way to SBOE, including revisions to the criteria that school districts use to assign teachers. The assignment rules are based on the certificates held by teachers, which sometimes change, and the rules must also reflect the addition of new courses, such as Ethnic Studies. For instance, someone with an 8-12 History certification could be assigned to teach a high school Ethnic Studies classroom. Also headed to the SBOE are revisions to the program requirements for educator preparation programs (EPPs) that would create an optional, intensive pre-service preparation and certification pathway; provide guidance for EPP name changes after a change in ownership; and require educators seeking certification in two areas to have clinical teaching experience in both. Lastly, the board adopted revisions to certification and testing requirements including the incorporation of the new intensive pre-service option; including the portfolio assessment EdTPA as a testing option; and updating the fees to include EdTPA and the subject-matter-only assessments used for the Pre-Admission Content Test (PACT) route (discussed below). Interestingly, the board adopted an amendment proposed by board member Tommy Coleman to clarify in the rule language that the EdTPA assessment option is strictly a pilot.

Board members next took up agenda items for proposal of new rules and the authorization of a public comment period on those. One set of proposed rules includes changes to the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP), which will provide for new commendations for high-performing EPPs; adopt the EPP accountability manual into rule; clarify how EPPs are accredited; allow SBEC to require an EPP to complete an action plan as a sanction for low performance; and make additional technical changes. Additionally, the Board proposed revisions to EPP admission requirements to implement Senate Bill (SB) 1839, HB 2039, HB 3349 that were passed by the 85th Legislature in 2017. The rule changes would add admission requirements for the Early Childhood through Grade 3 (EC-3) and Grades 6-12 Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificates created by those bills. The revisions would also allow candidates to take subject-matter-only assessments for their PACT if they don’t have the commensurate coursework and minimum 2.5 GPA that is required to enter an EPP. Currently, candidates can gain admission through a content pedagogy test, which tests for teaching strategies that the candidate hasn’t been exposed to yet. These items will be eligible for public comment from August 23 to September 23, 2019, and published in the Texas Register.

Since the 86th Legislature just ended its session in May, SBEC must act quickly to approve changes in order to meet the implementation date of several bills that were passed this year. Therefore, a couple items on the board’s agenda went straight to the proposal stage, skipping the initial discussion phase in order to save time. These include rule changes to implement the following bills:

  • SB 1200 by Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels), which allows for military spouses licensed in other states to teach in Texas.
  • HB 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), which repeals the master teacher certificates as of September 1, 2019. Any candidate wishing to gain or renew a master teacher certificate must do so by August 30, 2019. Any current certificates will remain valid up until their expiration date. Please see the Texas Education Agency’s information on master teacher certificates here for more detail.

The Board also took action on two non-rule “board items,” which were discussed at the previous meeting and are effective immediately upon approval. One of these was to approve the ability of the Region 13 Education Service Center (ESC) to offer a Reading Specialist Certification, which is a different class of certification from the master teacher certification. The other item was to name members who will serve on an advisory committee for the newly proposed special education certifications. These certifications would improve upon the current, broad special education certificate by creating a deaf/blind supplemental certificate and multiple new certificates that are more specialized by grade level and the degree of support needed by students.

The following items had been up for discussion at Friday’s SBEC meeting but were moved instead to the board’s October meeting agenda:

  • Proposed changes to educator disciplinary proceedings, sanctions, and contested cases to implement the provisions of HB 3, SB 1230, SB 1476, and SB 37 as passed by the 86th Legislature. Collectively, these bills will impact reporting requirements for superintendents, principals, and directors of public and private schools regarding educator misconduct; create a do-not-hire registry; and remove student loan default as a ground for discipline by SBEC. The anticipated rule changes would also permit SBEC to deny certificates to educators who have abandoned their contract within the past 12 months. This will cover intern and probationary certificates, which SBEC loses jurisdiction over once these 12-month certificates expire.
  • A board item meant to allow the Board to discuss the EPP continuing approval process, which includes procedures for review and update of EPP standards and requirements.
  • A board item to discuss the upcoming educator certification test development updates to current content pedagogy tests. The Principal as Instructional Leader assessment was one of the updated tests and is set to become operational on July 29, 2019. Other new tests will roll out into 2021 and beyond.

The last agenda item, a legislative update, was skipped at Friday’s meeting because members agreed that it had been adequately covered in a July 25th SBEC work group session. Bills impacting SBEC rulemaking as passed by the 86th Legislature include HB 3, HB 18, HB 403, HB 2424, SB 37, SB 241, SB 1200, SB 1230, and SB 1476. All of these except for HB 3’s Science of Teaching Reading certification requirements are now set to be discussed at the October 4, 2019 SBEC meeting. See a detailed table of SBEC’s proposed timeline for implementing provisions of each of these bills here. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for future updates.

TEA begins deep dives on HB 3 topics

The Texas Education Agency held an information session Monday, July 8, 2019, in which Commissioner of Education Mike Morath briefed education stakeholders, including ATPE’s lobbyists, on various components of House Bill (HB) 3 that will be rolling out over the next several months.

As the session’s major tax compression and school finance bill, HB 3 orders the state and school districts to implement several programmatic changes over the coming months and years. In order to make the process more transparent, TEA has created an HB 3 resource website, which you can view here.

DEEP DIVES

TEA’s website is intended to host a number of “deep dive” updates on various components of HB 3, with a new deep dive posted every week. One of the first is an update on master teacher certifications, which are being phased out as a result of HB 3. The ATPE Governmental Relations team has received several questions about what will happen to teachers who are currently certified as reading masters. The long and short of it is that all master certificates will be converted to “legacy” master certificates and remain valid until their expiration date. Current master teachers should consider whether their underlying certifications are aligned to their current teaching assignments and may reach out to ATPE or TEA with any questions. The official TEA guidance on the subject can be viewed here. The agency’s next deep dive will address compensatory education and is scheduled for release this Thursday, July 11, on the TEA’s HB 3 website. A list of scheduled deep dives can be found here.

SCHOOL FINANCE

The school finance bill should provide additional funding for most districts, worth an average of $635 more per average daily attendance (ADA). Along with the new funding, HB 3 orders school districts to do several things and suggests they do several more. Commissioner Morath conceded to stakeholders Monday that the state has not calculated whether the additional funding schools receive will be enough to do all of what they are being asked, and he indicated that it is likely that roughly 15 school districts will not receive sufficient funding to cover the increase in the educator minimum salary schedule (MSS) mandated under HB 3.

TEACHER PAY

Under HB 3, districts will have the option of accessing a “teacher incentive allotment” if they develop a local program to offer differentiated pay based on teacher quality. This allotment may provide participating districts from $3,000 to $32,000 in additional funding per teacher who qualifies under an approved local program, but it is important to note that this funding will not go directly to the teacher. Instead, that money will go to the district with the requirement that 90 percent of it be spent on compensation for teachers at the participating campus. Schools with existing programs will likely see additional funding in September 2020 for programs in effect during the upcoming school year, and new programs will likely be eligible to receive funding by 2021.

OTHER RULES IMPACTING EDUCATORS

The school finance bill also expanded the “do not hire registry” of public school educators who have been convicted of an inappropriate relationship to non-certified employees. This change is effective immediately, and a deep dive on this topic is scheduled to be released by TEA before the start of the fall semester.

Every teacher in kindergarten through grade 3 must attend a reading academy within the next three years at the school district’s expense. Each academy is expected to include a five-day summer institute, two days of pull-outs, and 12 coaching sessions during the year, plus three days the following summer. Educators will not receive a state stipend for attendance, but the agency indicated there is an expectation that districts will provide them with a stipend. All future K-3 educators will be required to cover the reading academy’s curriculum before placement, which means reading academy instruction will transfer to educator preparation programs (EPPs) going into the future.

New teachers certified for pre-K through grade 6 will also be required to demonstrate proficiency in the science of teaching reading (STR) by January 1, 2021. The agency is currently working on a test for STR proficiency.

OUTCOMES FUNDING

Districts may receive additional outcomes-based funding under HB 3 for each annual graduate above a certain threshold percentage who checks a box indicating they are college, career, or military ready (CCMR). Districts are expected to receive money this year for Class of 2018 graduates.

ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL DAYS

HB 3 allows schools to add instructional days beyond the current minimum of 180 days up to 210 days. These days will not be subject to compulsory attendance and will be optional at each district’s discretion. The funding will not cover the full cost of operating schools on those days, and the agency acknowledged that many districts may simply use this program to subsidize their existing summer school programs.

You can view the complete slide deck TEA presented to stakeholders on Monday by clicking here. This slide deck includes graphical presentations on many of HB 3’s main components. The agency will continue to produce informational content each week, with compensatory education scheduled for this week and pre-K scheduled for next week. You can see what the agency has already published by clicking on the HB 3 resource page.