Tag Archives: master teacher

ATPE supports lifetime Legacy Master Teacher certificates

Today, August 26, 2020, ATPE submitted public comments to the Texas Education Agency and the State Board of Education (SBEC) in support of a proposed rule change that would help Legacy Master Teachers (formerly “Master Teachers”) maintain their teaching positions.

As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, House Bill (HB) 3 of the 87th Texas legislature eliminated the ability of SBEC to issue or renew the Master Teacher (MT) certificates. In February, Chairman Huberty (R-Kingwood), author of HB 3, notified SBEC that this change was intended only to avoid confusion with the bill’s “master” teacher designations and was not meant to harm the employment of Master Teacher certificate holders. SBEC swiftly took action, requesting that TEA draft a rule to fix the issue.

The proposed rules are open for public comment through September 21. If approved at the October SBEC meeting and subsequent November SBOE meeting, the rules will effectively transition Legacy Master Teachers into lifetime certificate status. The rule update will allow Legacy Master Teachers to keep and/or obtain teaching assignments that require the Legacy Master Teacher certificate. If you are a Legacy Master Teacher or have a stake in the issue, submit a comment here!

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 21, 2020

For many of you, it’s the end of back-to-school week. While this week may not have been normal or ideal, we know the bumpy road ahead will be navigated by the best experts in the land – educators! Read this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: The Texas Education Agency (TEA) made news this week with a long-awaited announcement yesterday that there will be some data collection and reporting on COVID-19 cases in schools. TEA also updated its COVID-19 resource page to include guidance (also long-awaited) on promoting educator well-being. Read ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter’s blog post on these developments for more detail.

This week, ATPE hosted its second free legal webcast on COVID-19 issues facing school employees. In the presentation ATPE Managing Attorney Paul Tapp gives an overview of available accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, paid and unpaid leave options, and more. Find the latest webcast here. To watch our first legal webinar on educators’ rights and COVID-19, click here.

As always, we encourage you to check out ATPE’s comprehensive COVID-19 FAQs and Resources page for recent answers to common questions from educators and links to other helpful information. Also read ATPE’s tips on getting ready for the new school year here on the main ATPE blog. ATPE members can also use Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials regarding concerns about school reopening and other issues. Finally, we invite both educators and parents to take our survey on parent-teacher collaboration.


ELECTION UPDATE: U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy announced this week that policy changes to the U.S. Postal Service will not be implemented before the November election. The Democratic National Convention also took place this week, resulting in the final nomination of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris to the November presidential ticket. The Republican National Convention takes place next week. Read more about these developments in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


Public comment is now open on proposed State Board for Educator Certification rules that will provide a fix for Master Teacher certificate holders who are facing the expiration of their certificate, potentially putting their teaching assignments in jeopardy. The proposed rules would eliminate the expiration date on non-renewable “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. Read more about the issue and ATPE’s months-long advocacy efforts on behalf of master teachers in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


The Texas House Public Education Committee posted five formal requests for information this week. Several House committees are issuing the public requests for information in lieu of holding in-person hearings on their interim charges. Anyone can submit information, due by September 30. Get more detail on the requests in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


On Tuesday, our country observed the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, securing women’s right to vote. Read more about the history of the amendment and the role teachers played in its passage in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


Master Teacher rule fix opens for public comment

After months of advocacy by ATPE, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) tentatively agreed upon a proposed rule that will eliminate the expiration date of “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates, allowing certificate holders to maintain their teaching assignments obtained by virtue of their Master Teacher certificate. This proposed rule opens for public comment today, August 21, through September 21, 2020. If you’re interested or have a stake in the issue, please share your voice! Find the public comment notice and link to submit a comment here.

Here’s some history on the topic and advocacy ATPE has done:

The 86th Texas legislature passed House Bill (HB) 3, an enormous school finance package that provided billions in funding to public schools across the state. The bill created the Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA), a program designed to provide funding to districts tied to a teacher “designation” based on his or her performance. The highest designation under this program was labeled “Master Teacher.” In order to avoid confusion with existing certificates for Master Reading, Science, Math, and Technology Teachers, HB 3 repealed of the authorizing statutes for all the Master Teacher certificates.

That repeal took effect September 1, 2019. The implementation of the repeal meant that the SBEC could no longer issue or renew Master Teacher certificates and that the certificates would now be called “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. Master Teachers were faced with the prospect of losing both their certificate and their assignment. It was a tricky situation that needed to be solved.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies at the July SBEC meeting.

ATPE has advocated on behalf of Master Teachers over the past year to solve this issue. We have worked with TEA staff and SBEC board members and have provided testimony at the October 2019, December 2019, February 2020, May 2020, and July 2020 SBEC meetings in support of a fix. In January, we submitted public comment on the four-year rule review of the chapter in the Texas Administrative Code that formerly housed the Master Teacher certificate rules, imploring SBEC to take action.

ATPE also secured a letter from Chairman Dan Huberty that was delivered to SBEC members at the very moment ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier was testifying at the February 2020 SBEC meeting. The letter explained that the intent of the repeal was only to avoid confusion with the new and unrelated master teacher designation created by HB 3 as part of the TIA; the repeal was not meant to harm the employment prospects of current educators. In April, ATPE sent a letter letter to Gov. Greg Abbott expressing our appreciation for his interest in the issue.

Through these efforts, we have reached the final stages of fixing this unintended consequence for nearly 5,000 Texas educators. After public comment, the rule will be up for final adoption at the October SBEC meeting and, if approved, will also be reviewed by the State Board of Education. If ultimately approved, the rule is expected to take effect by the end of the 2020 calendar year.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 24, 2020

With the start of school just around the corner, it’s been another busy week for ATPE and the education community. Read about this week’s developments below from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: ATPE’s incoming State Vice President Karen Hames and Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell spoke on CNN’s Chris Cuomo Prime Time show Thursday night, July 23, to contribute their perspectives on school reopening. Hames and Mitchell stressed that teachers care about their kids and want to be in school with them, but that educators have concerns about being exposed to the coronavirus in a classroom setting. Hames shared reasons why school choice would not provide any real solutions to parents’ concerns about COVID-19, and Mitchell emphasized the need for additional federal funding and better guidance at the state level to help school districts prepare for reopening amid the pandemic. Watch video of the CNN segment here.

In other news related to COVID-19, the University Interscholastic League (UIL) released a long-awaited announcement this week that delays the schedules of 5A-6A conferences. Additionally, UIL shares that marching band practice in all conferences may not begin until September 7, 2020. Updates to TEA’s COVID-19 Support and Guidance Page this week included a new summary of the agency’s reopening guidance, several new “Strong Start” resources, and new CARES Act and attendance and enrollment information.

Visit the ATPE COVID-19 FAQ and Resources page for constantly updated resources and answers to common questions from educators. ATPE members can also use Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials regarding school reopening and other issues.


This week, ATPE submitted formal public comments on the U.S. Department of Education’s (ED) interim final rule directing how districts spend their CARES Act federal emergency dollars on equitable services for students in private schools. The interim final rule, effective July 1, 2020, is estimated to cause public school districts to spend over $44 million of their Title I-derived emergency funds on private school students regardless of poverty — more than $38 million more than they would normally spend under the longstanding interpretation of equitable services in federal law. ATPE’s comments urge the department to rescind its inequitable and distorted interpretation of the CARES Act, which goes against congressional intent. Over 5,200 comments have been submitted, but the department is not required to respond to them because of the emergency rulemaking process. Read more about the new federal rule in this recent Teach the Vote blog post. Read ATPE’s public comments here.


ELECTION UPDATE: Last week saw one of the most unusual elections in recent memory: A runoff postponed due to a global pandemic that proceeded to intensify in Texas as the new election date approached. Early voting was expanded from the usual one week to two weeks in order to reduce the load on polling locations. Some voters also took advantage of alternative methods of casting their ballots to avoid contracting COVID-19 at the polls, although Texas broke ranks with other parts of the country by refusing to expand the ability to vote by mail amid the pandemic. Despite the failure of lawsuits aimed at expanding mail-in ballot options, Texas saw a substantial increase in mail-in voting during this runoff election, which caused official results to be delayed by a few days but did not result in changes to any of the unofficial race outcomes revealed on election night. The July 14 election also exposed troubling voting issues that will have to be corrected before the November election.

With double the time to vote early, this month’s runoffs saw double the turnout over the primary runoff elections in 2018, 6.61% to 3.22%, respectively. After all of the debate over voting by mail, 30% of Democrats and 24% of Republicans who voted early cast their ballots by mail. That’s actually down from 36% of all early voters who cast mail-in ballots in the 2018 runoffs. Democrats had a huge turnout — nearly 956,000 voted in the primary runoffs, but comparable statewide numbers aren’t available for Republican turnout because there wasn’t a statewide GOP runoff like there was on the Democrats’ ballot. Party turnout in primary elections is not always an accurate predictor of turnout in the general election. But based on the turnout for a runoff election in July, in the Texas heat, in the middle of a deadly pandemic, it’s probably safe to assume that overall turnout for the November general election will be enormous. That makes researching candidates and making your voting plan for November more important than ever! See more election results in last week’s recap by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


CONGRESSIONAL UPDATE: The U.S. House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education met Thursday, July 23, for a hearing on the safe reopening of schools. The discussion bounced back and forth between the health risks for children and health risks for teachers and staff, with implications across the board for future funding to get schools on the path to a safe reopening. Get the full rundown on the meeting in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

While a proposal for additional federal emergency aid (dubbed the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions or “HEROES” Act) was approved by the U.S. House several weeks ago, the U.S. Senate has now agreed on its own $105 billion aid package for education, which includes $70 billion for K-12 schools. The proposal would tie the K-12 funding to in-person instruction by sending $35 billion to schools that open for in-person instruction and splitting the remaining $35 billion among all schools, regardless of their method of instruction. The $30 billion for colleges will not be tied to in-person instruction, and governors will receive the last $5 billion to spend on either K-12 or higher education. The details of the proposal are expected to be made public on Monday.



After a week-long delay, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released updated guidance for the reopening of public schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. The brunt of the new guidance issued last night, July 23, consists of justifying the push to reopen schools for in-person instruction. New items include recommending that schools group students and teachers into isolated cohorts or “pods” meant to limit in-person contact. There is also a checklist intended to assist parents in deciding  whether to send their children to school. A new mask guidance document suggests masks can be worn by anyone older than two years old, though some groups of students may need special adaptations and alternatives. Even as the guidance encourages reopening, it urges caution to those considering to do so in areas of substantial, uncontrolled transmission. Furthermore, the guidance recommends tying operational decisions to local epidemiological conditions. The guidance states as follows:

“Schools should be prepared for COVID-19 cases and exposure to occur in their facilities. Collaborating with local health officials will continue to be important once students are back to school, as they can provide regular updates about the status of COVID-19 in the community and help support and maintain the health and wellbeing of students, teachers, and staff.”

All of the CDC guidance documents, including the latest guidance as well as recommendations dating back to May, can be found here.


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today, July 24, to take action on several items implementing the Science of Teaching Reading exam requirements from last year’s House Bill (HB) 3 and to discuss COVID-19 considerations related to certification. Additionally, the board approved a proposal to transition Legacy Master Teacher certificate holders into lifetime certificates, as HB 3 barred the Master Teacher certificate from being issued or renewed. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified before SBEC in support of this proposal, continuing our months-long advocacy for a fix for Master Teachers. Read more about today’s SBEC meeting in this blog post from Chevalier and read the written testimony here.


SCHOOL FINANCE UPDATE: Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar created buzz this week with the release of his certification revenue estimate, which shows that the state faces a $4.6 billion deficit due to both COVID-19 and the largest drop in oil prices in decades. While some revenue sources have helped to soften the blow, including federal coronavirus aid and new revenue from online commerce, the uncertainties ahead will make the state budget lawmakers’ top concern in the upcoming 2021 legislative session. Read more about the revenue esimate and Hegar’s interview with the Texas Tribune this week in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.  

In other school finance news, Just Fund It, a non-partisan group of parents, students, and community members across Texas advocating for increased public school funding, has begun a petition aimed at urging Gov. Abbott to ensure stable and predictable school funding. Specifically, the petition asks the governor to extend the 12-week “hold harmless” period for calculating funding based on attendance as recently announced by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) for the coming school year. The group presents a compelling argument for extending the hold harmless to cover the entire 2020-21 school year.

Summary of July 24 SBEC meeting

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today, July 24, 2020, to take up a lengthy agenda, including the adoption of five items related to the implementation of the Science of Teaching Reading and a proposed fix for expiring Legacy Master Teacher certificates.

Highlights:

  • SBEC approved an ATPE-backed proposal to eliminate the expiration date of Legacy Master Teacher certificates, which were barred from being newly issued or renewed by last year’s House Bill (HB) 3.
  • The board adopted rules to implement science of teaching reading requirements of HB 3, including new testing requirements and replacement certificates for PK-6.
  • Two new non-voting members joined the board: Emily Garcia, Executive Director of Urban Teachers in Dallas replaced Carlos Villagrana as the alternative certification program representative. Dr. Edward Hill is replaced by Dr. Alma Rodriguez, Dean of the College of Education at the University of Texas- Rio Grande Valley in Brownsville. Both new members were former public school teachers and administrators.
  • SBEC will meet again next Friday, July 31, to discuss special rules regarding COVID-19 and educator candidates and will likely hear from many educator preparation stakeholders who want flexibility for their programs amid an ever-changing landscape of pandemic policies and practices.

Legacy Master Teachers

Chevalier testifies at SBEC meeting, July 24, 2020.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified today in support of a proposal to create two new rules that would eliminate the expiration date on Legacy Master Teacher (LMT) certificates and make these certificates exempt from renewal requirements. The rules would apply to valid LMT certificates and LMT certificates that expired on or after September 1, 2019.

This transition to a lifetime certificate will solve the unintended consequences of House Bill (HB) 3, which barred the Master Teacher certificates from being issued or renewed after September 1, 2019. This change has left some teachers unable to continue in their current teaching assignments once their LMT certificate expires. ATPE pushed the board for several months to take action on this issue, even requesting a letter of legislative intent from House Public Education Committee chairman and HB 3 author Dan Huberty.

Read Chevalier’s written testimony in support of the new rules here and see video of her oral testimony at 4:00:00 here. The board approved the proposal, which will be published in the Texas Register for public comment from August 21 to September 21, 2020. The proposal will then be up for final adoption at the October SBEC meeting and then subject to review by the State Board of Education. If all approval processes are finalized, the effective date of this proposal would be December 27, 2020, and the Texas Education Agency (TEA) has said it will do outreach over the winter break to make sure LMTs are aware of the change.

Coronavirus Update

Gov. Greg Abbott has provided flexibility through suspensions of statutes and rules that allowed Spring 2020 certification candidates to spend less time on face-to-face requirements, allowed candidates who weren’t able to test but who had completed all preparation requirements to receive a one year probationary certificate, and allowed for those have yet to pass the content pedagogy test to obtain a one-year intern certificate (only issuable prior to October 1). Other changes have allowed extension of a one-year emergency permit for candidates who are unable to test, and the state suspended requirements that internships, practicums, and clinical teaching experiences must occur in actual school settings rather than virtual ones. Witnesses testifying today echoed public comment provided at the beginning of the SBEC meeting, expressing that school district plans are extremely varied in terms of start dates, instructional settings, learning plans, and visitor policies, which makes it difficult to place student teachers and help students meet their preparation requirements. Next Friday, July 31, the board will consider specific rulemaking related to further COVID-19 considerations for educator preparation.

Science of Teaching Reading

SBEC adopted several agenda items today that implement the new science of teaching reading (STR) requirements of HB 3. Every teacher candidate issued a standard certificate after January 1, 2021, must take a stand-alone STR certification exam if they plan to earn a certificate in Early Childhood (EC): PK-3, Core Subjects: EC-6, Core Subjects: 4-8, English Language Arts and Reading: Grades 4–8, English Language Arts and Reading/Social Studies: Grades 4–8. These certificates (except for EC: PK-3) will be replaced after December 31, 2020, with new certificates that incorporate science of teaching reading into their name, standards, and testing requirements. Replacement certification exams are also being developed so that content within the STR is not duplicatively tested. Additionally, through August 2021, the STR exam requirement implementation will be pass/fail while curriculum is refined and details are being worked out. Starting September 6, 2021, a scaled score for the STR will be implemented. See below for the operational dates of the new tests.

Today’s adopted rules implement the STR change by updating the pre-admission content test requirements, adding an approval process for educator preparation programs (EPPs) to be able to offer the replacement certificates, adding the replacement certificates to the categories of classroom teaching certificates, updating exam requirements for the replacement certificates, and reorganizing the STR standards in rule to apply to all EC-6 educators.

TEA also provided an update to SBEC members on test development and its communication strategy with the field and candidates. An STR exam preparation manual is expected to be available September 2020. A TExES in Focus: Science of Teaching Reading (293) Webinar was held July 16, and it will be posted soon on the TEA website. TEA also plans to hold a deep-dive webinar series on the changes. EPPs must attest by December 15, 2020, to their ability and readiness to prepare candidates for the STR-impacted fields.

Other Adopted Rules

SBEC adopted several changes to rules regarding educator preparation requirements, including guidance to programs that are closing or consolidating; a requirement that EPPs that are closing publish in writing a formal exit or dismissal policy; additions to curriculum to align with the mental health, abuse, and suicide requirements of House Bill 18 (86th Texas legislature); alignment to board standards of the 150 clock hours of coursework and training prior to clinical teaching or internship; clarifications on certificate deactivations; guidance about summer practicums; guidance for programs and candidates who need to finish their practicum out-of-state and out-of-country; and guidance about test approval for completers from prior years who return to their program later on to test.

The board also adopted into rule new standards for bilingual Spanish, EC-6 and EC-12 special education, and deafblind certification areas and removed the one-year expiration date on passing PACT to give candidates more time to be admitted to a program if they have a passing score on a PACT exam that is more than a year old.

Proposed Changes

The board approved the proposed mandatory four-year rule review for 19 TAC Chapter 234, which relates to preparation, testing, certification, and renewal requirements for military service members, military spouses, and military veterans.

SBEC also discussed proposals for the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP), including the “Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster” accreditation status for EPPs due to Abbott’s disaster declaration. Additionally, data for 2019-20 will be reported only, and candidates who were issued a probationary certificate under Abbott’s COVID-19 waivers will be excluded from ASEP pass rates for the 2020-21 school year. TEA also proposed an ASEP index, which combines the five ASEP indicators to create an overall “index” or score for EPPs. The five indicators are PPR/non-PPR pass rates, principal surveys, student growth, observation frequency and quality, and new teacher surveys. Each of these indicators will be weighted to create the index, with the PPR/non-PPR pass rates having the greatest weight. For the 2020-21 year, EPPs’ status will be the more favorable outcome of the index versus the current system. The proposed rule also contains an updated to say that if an EPP is under a board order, they aren’t eligible for a commendation.

A model for the student growth indicator of the ASEP system was also proposed today, which will assign points to beginning teachers of record in their first three years based on their students’ growth on standardized testing. These points will be attributed to the beginning teachers’ EPPs and incorporated into those programs’ ASEP scores. Earliest is Spring 2024 before this indicator could become implemented, due to uncertainties regarding testing during the pandemic.

The board also approved proposed updates to the SBEC rule chapter that designates which certificates are appropriate for certain teaching assignments (19 TAC Chapter 231). This includes changing “Master Teacher” to “Legacy Master Teacher” and updates to incorporate assignments for new SBOE-approved courses, such as English Language Development Acquisition, African American studies, and energy cluster courses (Oil and Gas Production).

Discussion Only Items

The first year of the EdTPA pilot program included 27 EPPs — 16 institutions of higher education (IHE) and 11 alternative certification programs (ACP). Over 450 candidates have submitted portfolios. The second year of the pilot will include 35 EPPs (19 IHEs, and 16 ACPs). SBEC members discussed the fact that the state of Georgia has eliminated its EdTPA requirements, while two other state legislatures have discussed eliminating EdTPA from their state frameworks. Researchers from Sam Houston State University will provide an update on their T-TESS pilot, which aims to explore an alternative to EdTPA, at the October SBEC meeting.

The board is set to meet again next Friday, July 31. Subsequent meetings this year are set for October 9 and December 11, 2020.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 17, 2020

This week’s news includes election analysis, ATPE’s updated recommendations for safely reopening schools, and a key announcement from the state today giving districts slightly more flexibility to operate virtually at the beginning of the school year. Read about these developments and more in this week’s wrap-up from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


This week, ATPE released an updated set of comprehensive recommendations for reopening schools that prioritize safety, the involvement of educators and parents in decision making, and local flexibility. The ATPE plan calls for the state to develop a framework using objective medical data such as the test positivity rate, hospitalizations, or newly confirmed COVID-19 cases as potential gating criteria for decisions on when it is safe to reopen schools for in-person instruction. In a statement, ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes said the framework will “minimize the risk of hasty reopening decisions based on politics, rather than prioritizing the health and safety of students and school employees.” In our recommendations, ATPE also urges the state to suspend standardized testing in the 2020-21 school year, as urged by the ATPE House of Delegates last week. These recommendations were sent in a letter to Governor Abbott and Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath.

Read more about the ATPE proposal in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark WigginsATPE members can use our premier advocacy tool Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials regarding the ATPE plan for reopening and other concerns they may have with regard to the return to school.


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: Last week’s release of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) public health guidance left educators wanting more specificity and clarity on the health and safety aspects of the return to in-person instruction this fall. This week, snippets of new information indicating a relaxation of in-person schooling requirements trickled through news outlets, based on interviews with the governor and TEA officials. Today the agency posted more official guidance on its website, along with a press release and video by Commissioner Mike Morath.

As foreshadowed in reporting by the Texas Tribune, the new public health guidance that TEA issued today enables districts to operate virtually for the first four weeks of school (instead of three), with an additional four weeks of transition possible under local school board decision-making authority and a waiver from the state. A caveat to this new flexibility is that districts must provide in-person instruction to any student who does not have Internet access or the devices necessary to participate in virtual instruction, even during the transition period. Additionally, under the new TEA guidance districts can offer a hybrid instructional model for high school students only in order to stagger the number of students on campus at any given time. Read more about today’s developments in this blog post on Teach the Vote.

Updates to TEA’s COVID-19 Support and Guidance Page this week included additional updates to the public health orders page regarding personal protective equipment (PPE) procurement and distribution and a document outlining the informal selection process for symptom-screening mobile and web-based applications that districts may use. Updates to instructional continuity included new operation connectivity resources, sample school instructional models, and new Texas Home Learning resources. The waivers, finance, and grants page was updated with information about new federal funding, the CARES Act, and equitable services FAQs. The TEA website also added new information for the high school hybrid waiver and extended transition period waiver announced today, and updates to the attendance and enrollment FAQ to reflect the changes shared today. The Texas educators support page was also updated with an FAQ document about leave and resignation.

As educators learn of their district’s plans, they frequently have questions regarding their health and safety and professional rights and responsibilities. Visit the ATPE COVID-19 FAQ and Resources page for the constantly updated resources and answers to common questions.


ELECTION UPDATE: Texas voters decided primary runoff races across Texas this week, leading to some surprise wins and losses. Turnout in runoff elections is typically low, but this year’s runoffs saw higher turnout than in previous years. While Election Day turnout wasn’t immediately available, turnout data during early voting showed a significant increase in participation — though still far from the numbers we see during the November elections. Read a full rundown on this week’s election results in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


FEDERAL UPDATE: Vice President Mike Pence last week indicated the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) would be issuing new school reopening guidelines today, but the federal health agency now says it expects to release those new guidelines by the end of this month. On Capitol Hill, the House Education and Labor Committee has planned a July 23 hearing of its Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee to examine recommendations for safely reopening schools. The committee asked CDC Director Robert Redfield to testify at the hearing, but media reports out of Washington late today say the White House will prohibit Redfield from appearing at the meeting.

Tonja Gray

Jimmy Lee

ATPE State President Tonja Gray and Vice President Jimmy Lee participated in virtual meetings this week with some of the Texas congressional delegation, including members of the House education committee. In addition to discussing school reopening concerns and the need for more federal funding to help schools deal with COVID-19, ATPE also urged the congressmen to take needed action on Social Security reform and replacing the harmful Windfall Elimination Provision. Additional meetings are scheduled for next week.

Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and the White House are continuing to push for in-person instruction in the fall. DeVos spoke with both CNN and Fox News this week and reiterated previous sentiments that the CDC guidelines for reopening were flexible and that states should expand school choice. To CNN, DeVos said, “There is nothing in the data that would suggest that kids being back in school is dangerous to them,” which is contrary to data that shows children are being infected by COVID-19. Even the American Academy of Pediatrics, often cited by President Trump, DeVos, and TEA as an authority on handling the return to school, has joined national education groups in recommending that reopening be subject to the advice of local health experts.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) Board of Trustees convened virtually this week for its regularly scheduled meeting. The board discussed a number of agenda items including the current financial market in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, TRS-Care and ActiveCare, the fiscal year 2021 budget, highlights of the agency’s preliminary legislative appropriations request, and updated considerations on TRS space planning. View board materials and archived video of the three-day meeting here. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for a blog post coming soon with additional highlights of the meeting.


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) will meet next Friday, July 24, to take up an agenda that includes implementation of the new Science of Teaching Reading exam requirements from last year’s House Bill (HB) 3 and a discussion of COVID-19 considerations related to certification. Additionally, the agenda includes a proposed rule that would remove the expiration date on the Legacy Master Teacher certificates. This change, heavily pushed for by ATPE, will protect Legacy Master Teacher certificate holders from the unintended consequences of HB 3, which repealed the authorization for Master Teacher certificates and barred them from being renewed. Check back on Teach the Vote next week for an update on the meeting.

Highlights of the May 2020 SBEC meeting

In its first meeting conducted via Zoom, the certification board discussed educators and coronavirus, Master Teachers, and more.

On Friday, May 1, 2020, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met for the first time in a virtual setting, due to COVID-19 meeting restrictions. Here are the highlights from the board’s agenda:

  • Carlos Villagrana of Teaching Excellence will no longer be a member of the SBEC board.
  • The Texas Education Agency (TEA) says beginning teacher support is a “huge priority” in light of COVID-19 and that the state is looking to federal CARES Act funding to implement programs and resources in this area.
  • SBEC gave the nod to rule changes to implement the Science of Teaching Reading requirements in last year’s House Bill 3 for all EC-6 teachers.
  • The board rejected an alternative certification program’s petition for several rule changes that would have lessened the responsibility of educator preparation programs (EPPs) to prepare high-quality teachers.
  • In a discussion of tying EPP accountability to STAAR-based student growth, EPPs and board members alike expressed concerns about clarity of the methodology and determining cut scores.
  • In a discussion-only item, SBEC members overwhelmingly agreed with ATPE in support of removing the expiration date from Legacy Master Teacher certificates. TEA will move forward with rule-making on this issue.

“Legacy” Master Teachers

On Friday, SBEC took up a discussion-only agenda item to move forward with potential solutions for Master Teachers (MT), whose certificates were eliminated under House Bill (HB) 3 passed by last year’s legislature. Though the process for gaining a MT certificate was arduous and often costly, MTs will not be able to renew these certificates and, upon their expiration, may find themselves ineligible to continue in their current teaching assignment.

In a letter requested by ATPE and delivered to the board at its Feb. 2020 meeting, HB 3 author Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) explained that the intent of his bill was never to abandon MTs’ expertise, but simply to avoid naming confusion with the “master” teacher merit designation also included in the bill as part of the Teacher Incentive Allotment. This is why MTs now see the qualifier “legacy” attached to their certificate. Huberty’s letter urged the board to allow legacy MT certificate holders to “maintain their existing teaching assignments without interruption, additional cost, or the need to seek additional certifications,” which prompted today’s discussion on the SBEC agenda.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified virtually before SBEC on May 1, 2020.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier provided written and oral testimony today in support of solutions to allow MTs to retain their teaching assignments. In particular, ATPE supported a TEA-suggested option to remove the expiration date from Legacy MT certificates, and the board overwhelmingly agreed. ATPE looks forward to continuing to work on this issue as rules are proposed. For background on ATPE’s previous work regarding MTs, see this blog post by Chevalier.

Coronavirus and educators:

In the first discussion of the day, the board received an overview of the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on educators. TEA staff explained that the first round of governor-issued waivers changed the time and physical setting requirements for clinical teaching, internships, and field-experience. The second round of waivers provided flexibility for certain candidates who have not been able to meet testing requirements for a one-year probationary certificate, which is typically reserved for candidates in alternative certification programs. This waiver gives candidates a year to meet the testing requirements as testing centers slowly reopen.

SBEC member Laurie Turner asked if waivers would still apply in the event of a second viral surge. TEA Associate Commissioner Ryan Franklin replied that his team is developing a plan for a next phase of admission and entrance requirements for candidates entering programs this fall. Franklin said all things will be on the table and a lot will depend on the emergency declaration from the governor’s office that enables TEA to address these issues.

SBEC heard testimony from representatives of the University of Texas at Austin, who said new teachers will need extra support next year due to decreased preparation experiences and the additional needs of students who have lost learning due to the pandemic. Testifiers argued that federal funding could be used for statewide targeted induction support, including activities such as close mentoring, summer professional learning, micro-credentialing, a hotline, and virtual planning sessions over the summer. Kelvey Oeser of TEA said this is a huge priority for the agency and that they are looking at the CARES Act as a potential funding source.

Implementation of the Science of Teaching Reading requirements:

Last year’s HB 3 requires  candidates who plan to teach students in grades EC-6 to complete a Science of Teaching Reading (STR) exam. To reflect this requirement, the board approved proposed amendments today across several chapters in Title 19 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC) to implement the replacement certificate names, as well as other changes that might have been proposed in each particular chapter. These proposed changes by chapter will be posted in the Texas Register for public comment beginning May 29, 2020 and ending June 29, 2020. See below for more detail:

Chapter 227: Changes include updates to the PACT to implement the STR exam and removal of the one-year expiration date on passing PACT. This would reduce the burden on candidates, who may have taken a PACT exam more than a year before they try to gain admission to an EPP.

Chapter 228: This chapter houses requirements for EPPs. Eight revisions were approved, five of which were discussed at the February SBEC meeting. These would simplify a table of requirements in the chapter; implement portions of HB 18 passed by the legislature in 2019; authorize teaching sites outside of Texas in situations such as military assignment; provide admittance policy guidance to EPPs that are closing or consolidating; restrict a summer-only practicum unless it is part of a year-round school or extended year program; provide a dismissal policy for candidates who violate the code of ethics; supply concise reasons that an EPP would no longer support a candidate in an internship; and clarify the number (three) and spacing of formal observations conducted during a practicum. Three new changes to EPP requirements were made since the February meeting so that EPPs can offer the replacement certificates for the STR exam.

Chapter 230: The revisions update the testing figure in 230.21(e) to implement the STR requirements, including the insertion of replacement certificate names and a content pedagogy exam transition. This transition is necessary because the exams are based on standards that are changing with implementation of the STR and changes to English Language Arts and Reading (ELAR) curriculum standards in the TEKS. The changes also include technical edits to phase out a retired test and update test numbering conventions.

Chapter 233: This adds the replacement STR certificates to the categories of classroom teaching certificates and language requiring educators who teacher pre-K-6 to demonstrate proficiency of STR. New rule language also implements transition deadlines.

Chapter 235: These changes update the organization of the STR standards to comply with HB 3, including a split certification for special education with separate certificates for grades EC-6 and 6-12. Changes also include two sets of supplemental certificate standards: one for bilingual Spanish, grades EC-12, focusing on bilingualism, biliteracy, and biculturalism; and another for “DeafBlind” grades EC-12.

In a discussion-only item, the board also considered a communication timeline for the Science of Teaching Read exam transition, including test development.

Other action items:

SBEC approved the adoption of revisions to 19 TAC Chapter 232 to implement technical updates to renewal and fingerprinting procedures and several bills passed by the 86th Legislature in 2019. The new legislative requirements include continuing professional education regarding mental health and substance abuse training under HB 18 and Senate Bill (SB) 11); training requirements for superintendents on sexual abuse and human trafficking per HB 403; and the removal of student loan default as grounds to deny the a certificate renewal under SB 37. The fingerprinting updates include process and technology changes that match current practice. The simplification and reorganization of the chapter was presented as suggested by ATPE and other stakeholders.

The board voted to deny a rulemaking petition that included four requests related to EPPs. State law in the Texas Government Code allows any interested person to petition a rulemaking agency, such as SBEC, for regulatory action. The petition by an individual representing an alternative certification program (ACP) included requests for SBEC to make four rule changes as follows: 1) revert back to requiring that candidates take a certification exam for admission purposes into an EPP; 2) allow ACPs and post-baccalaureate programs to prepare candidates for pre-admission content tests; 3) change the EPP accountability system to give EPPs credit for any candidate who passes within the first five attempts, as opposed to current rule that is limited to the first two attempts; and 4) change the intern certificate to two-years rather than one-year. This last change would extend the amount of time that intern teachers are teaching students without having met certain proficiency requirements required at the end on an intern year. After mixed testimony, the board overwhelmingly agreed on the importance of keeping educator preparation as rigorous as possible and voted to deny the request

Discussion-only agenda items (no action taken):

The board also discussed potential changes to 19 TAC Chapter 229, covering the Accountability System for Educator Preparation (ASEP). Because of COVID-19, TEA proposed an EPP accreditation status of “Not Rated: State of Disaster,” since candidates cannot take certification tests due to test center closures and teacher and principal surveys were waived. An EPPs status from the prior year will remain its current status, which effectively makes the Not Rated status a pause in the accountability system. The agency also proposed a summative ASEP index, which brings all of the accountability indicators together through a weighting system. TEA presented a student growth indicator that would be integrated into the system, based on student scores on the State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness (STAAR) test. In this indicator, a beginning teacher’s growth scores would be determined by comparing STAAR student achievement to expected growth. This growth score would then be compared to a statewide cut score. Mark Olofson of TEA noted that the agency will provide more information about that manner in which candidates who are on probationary certificates under the governor’s waiver would fit into the ASEP model. Testimony on the changes included concerns from EPPs that the ASEP manual should be very explicit about which teachers will be included in the student growth indicator and what the cut scores will be, with which the board seemed to agree.

Lastly, the board discussed the voluntary closure of the Training via E-Learning Alternative Certification Program (TEACH) ACP. During a January 2020 status check of EPPs operating under agreed orders, TEA found that the TEACH program violated the agreed operating conditions by admitting students when the program was not allowed to do so. Upon notification of the violation, TEACH opted to voluntarily close in lieu of revocation.

Other housekeeping matters:

SBEC member Carlos Villagrana notified the board today that he is transitioning away from his role with Teaching Excellence, which is Yes Prep charter school’s alternative certification program. Because of this, he will not be able to remain a member of SBEC. Another EPP-oriented position on the board that is meant for a dean of a college of education has been vacant for a year. Both positions must be filled by governor’s appointments.

The board did not take up any further discussion of changes to contract abandonment rules, a topic that had bounced around since last fall through several meetings. The previously proposed changes to contract abandonment rules were meant to mitigate situations in which teachers relied on reasonable beliefs that their resignations had been accepted by someone in their districts with authority to do so. However, some teachers were mistaken and subsequently faced contract abandonment consequences. Administrators opposed the changes and the board ultimately reached a near-consensus at its February meeting that no action should be taken.

TEA postponed an update on the EdTPA performance assessment pilot until the July SBEC meeting.

Future meetings:

The upcoming SBEC meeting dates for 2020 are:

  • July 24, 2020
  • Oct. 9, 2020
  • Dec. 11, 2020

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: April 24, 2020

Educators won’t see their classrooms filled with students anytime soon, so “emergency remote learning” and teacher parades will have to suffice in the meantime. Here is a look at this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: As we reported on our blog last week, Gov. Greg Abbott is slowly rolling out plans for a gradual reopening of Texas businesses, with more information expected to come from the governor on April 27. Abbott has ordered schools to remain physically closed through the end of the school year, while allowing educators to access school buildings to carry out their duties. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has shared guidance on entering school buildings, which states that teachers should self-screen, maintain social distancing, and wear a face covering, among other things.

TEA has also added to its website a COVID-19 Support page for Texas educators. This resource page has a more limited scope than TEA’s main coronavirus resource section, focusing on topics of interest to educators, such as certification and evaluation.

The educator support page features new guidance this week for individuals pursuing educator certification, including details on a waiver from Gov. Abbott that allows certain educator certification candidates to apply for a one-year probationary certificate. These candidates will have to complete the fingerprinting process, which – while safer for students – will also cause some hiccups as many fingerprinting locations are closed or have limited appointments. TEA announced last week that out-of-state educators who are on a one-year certificate will receive an automatic one-year extension. Next Friday, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is set to discuss other COVID-19-related educator issues, stay tuned to Teach the Vote and @TeachtheVote on Twitter for coverage. Find the May 1 SBEC agenda here.

As we previously reported, the State Board of Education (SBOE) briefly discussed funding concerns associated with COVID-19, a thought that is on the minds of many educators. ATPE is monitoring the Texas economy and has taken action by sending a joint letter to TEA Commissioner Mike Morath requesting the suspension of charter school expansions during this pandemic. Current charter expansions could cost the state $90 million dollars at a time when state agencies and other public institutions foresee budget cuts on the horizon. ATPE has not received a reply to this request, though there was affirmation at the SBOE meeting that TEA would provide a response.

ATPE also hopes to hear back from the commissioner on our request for statewide action in the application of educator appraisals. Several other states have suspended appraisals, while others, like Texas, have left the decision up to individual school districts. Many educators have expressed that they feel like first-year teachers again and some say they haven’t heard from certain students since they last saw them in school. While feedback is essential for professional growth, this unique situation is likely to yield unfair and invalid appraisal results.

For more resources related to the pandemic, visit ATPE’s Coronavirus FAQ and Resources page for frequently updated information for educators, and follow the ATPE lobby team via @TeachtheVote on Twitter for the latest legislative and regulatory news. Also, keep reading below for updates on federal developments pertaining to COVID-19.


FEDERAL UPDATE: More COVID-19 developments at the federal level occurred this week as the U.S. Department of Education (ED) released the long-awaited application for Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Act funding. The CARES Act provides waivers of various federal laws and $13.5 billion in education-dedicated funding, 90% of which is divvied up through Title I formulas. According to the Learning Policy Institute, Texas is expected to receive on average $264 per pupil for a total of over $1.4 billion dollars from the CARES Act. This amount includes the Texas portion of the $13.5 billion and assumes half of the Texas portion of the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) Fund, which could send over $307 million to Texas, will go to PK-12 with the other half going to higher education. Without any additional federal funding, a statewide cut to education of just 6% would zap the boost from the CARES Act. Texas has also been approved for federal spending waivers, which will allow districts to move federal funds around more freely to address new expenditures and potential shortfalls in the future (though this will not solve overall cuts).

Congress also passed a fourth coronavirus aid package this week, which sends hundreds of billions of dollars to small businesses and provides assistance for hospitals and COVID-19 testing needs. For more information about how the other coronavirus aid packages impact you, including paid family/sick leave and cash rebates, visit ATPE’s Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) page here and the CARES Act page here.


ELECTION UPDATE: With Texas’ July 14 primary runoff elections on the horizon, many Texans are contemplating the safety of voting in person. The option of mail-in voting, while recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), has become a partisan issue. Ruling on one of two lawsuits filed by the Texas Democratic Party, a Texas district judge sided with voters last week by effectively allowing all Texans to vote by mail. This decision is expected to be appealed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, who has already refuted the arguments used by the district judge. Do you think all Texans should be allowed to vote by mail? Read more in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Related: This year’s state legislative elections have even more significance with redistricting on the horizon. The 87th Texas Legislature is set to redraw district boundaries during the 2021 legislative session that begins in January. That’s why it’s important for Texans to respond to the 2020 U.S. Census. Talk to everyone you can about completing the census online, especially if they have small children. The census is crucial for funding public schools and informing redistricting decisions next year. Learn more about the 2020 Census and find FAQs here.


Master Teacher certification was eliminated last year as part of House Bill (HB) 3 passed by the 86th Texas legislature, reportedly to avoid avoid naming confusion with the “master teacher” designation in the new Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA) program. This has left Master Teachers wondering if they can keep their current teaching assignments once their certificates expire. The ATPE lobby team has been working on this issue with state leaders to find a solution and has made significant progress. Read more in this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


ATPE member and award-winning, 17-year teaching veteran Amy McKee of Leander ISD planned to have her annual show week for her dance students this week. McKee’s spring show is the culmination of months of hard work, growth, and team spirit, and is an emotional capstone for seniors who ceremoniously hang up their uniform hats at the end of the show. Not about to let her students miss out on the joys of show week, McKee put her creative skills to work and curated a series of special, “socially-distanced” events to honor her students.

Thank you to all educators who are transitioning to the unique needs of students during this time! #TeachersCan

Do you have a story to tell? ATPE wants to hear how you are adapting to a new educational environment during the coronavirus pandemic. Click here to email us your stories, best practices for distance learning, or strategies you’re using to stay upbeat during the crisis.

ATPE continues advocacy for Master Teacher fix

While it is not uncommon for Texas teaching certificates to come and go as they keep up with the needs of an evolving education system, the legislature’s abrupt decision in 2019 to eliminate prestigious Master Teacher certificates caught many by surprise. To address this issue, ATPE’s lobbyists have been working diligently with state leaders and officials to ensure that the expertise and value of Master Teacher certificate holders is upheld.

Under House Bill (HB) 3 passed by the 86th Texas legislature in 2019, Master Teacher certificates can no longer be issued or renewed, effective September 1, 2019. The bill also repealed the authorizing statutes for those Master Teacher certificates, which were offered in Reading, Mathematics, Science, and Technology, essentially wiping them from existence. Master Teacher certificate holders will now find their certificates marked with a “legacy” notation, as designated by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC).

This change has left many of our state’s nearly 5,000 Master Teachers perplexed as to the status of their certificates and their teaching assignment prospects. Once their Master Teacher certificate expires, will they be able to continue teaching in their current position? Take the popular Master Reading Teacher certificate as an example (82% of Master Teachers hold this certificate). First issued in 2001, this certificate was designed for those who wanted to go above and beyond – only obtainable by educators who had already been teaching on a standard certificate. Because the certificate is EC-12, in some cases it allows an educator to obtain a teaching assignment for which they wouldn’t otherwise be eligible if they held only their underlying standard certificate. Teachers in this situation who want to maintain their current assignments must either pay to take a test for earning an appropriate credential, request permission to remain in their assignment on an expired certificate, or find another job.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies before SBEC, Dec. 6, 2019

ATPE has been working with SBEC, the Texas Education Agency (TEA), members of the legislature, and state leaders to remedy this issue for several months. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier submitted written testimony at an SBEC meeting on October 4, 2019, written and oral testimony at the December 6, 2019 SBEC meeting, and written and oral testimony at the February 21, 2020 SBEC meeting. ATPE also submitted public comments on the rule review of Chapter 239, Student Services Certificates, which is where the original Master Teacher certificates were housed in the Texas Administrative Code.

These efforts have led to important developments, including a letter of intent being shared by House Public Education Committee chairman and HB 3 author Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) and a decision to add a discussion item to the agenda for an upcoming SBEC meeting on May 1, 2020, aimed at finding solutions to the Master Teacher issue. (The May 1 SBEC meeting starts at 8:30 a.m. and will be broadcast here. ATPE will also provide updates on the meeting here on our Teach the Vote blog.)

In unexpectedly dramatic fashion, Chairman Huberty’s letter in response to ATPE’s advocacy was delivered into SBEC members’ hands as ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier was delivering her testimony on the Master Teachers issue during the February SBEC meeting. The letter stated that the intent of the elimination of the Master Teacher certificates was to avoid naming confusion with the newly created “master teacher” designations under the state’s new Teacher Incentive Allotment, also included in HB 3.

“Our intent was never to abandon the expertise of these highly trained educators,” Huberty wrote in the letter. “Holders of legacy master teacher certificates should be entitled to maintain their existing assignments without interruption, additional cost, or the need to seek additional certifications.”

Responding to the requests from ATPE and the letter from Chairman Huberty, SBEC members voted to create a separate agenda item for the May SBEC meeting to discuss options for Master Teacher certificate holders. ATPE has also sent a letter letter to Gov. Greg Abbott expressing our appreciation for his interest in the issue.

Master Teacher certificate holders underwent time-intensive, rigorous, and often costly educator preparation programs in order to receive this extra credential. Their roles are content-specific and include teacher mentoring duties as they support the other professionals on their campus. Master Teachers are also highly educated, with 67% having either a master’s or doctorate degree. In many cases, the Master Teacher certificates (especially the Master Reading Teacher certificate) are highly prized, and at least in the early days of the certificate, were accompanied by stipends. Furthermore, Master Reading Teachers’ focus on literacy is crucial to the reading success of the state and is directly related to many of the aims of HB 3.

As this issue progresses, ATPE will continue to work carefully to preserve the hard work and expertise of Master Teacher certificate holders and share updates here on our advocacy blog.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Feb. 21, 2020

It’s the first week of early voting in Texas! Whether you’ve already voted or are making your plan to vote by March 3, stay up-to-date on the latest education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


ELECTION UPDATE: Early voting for the 2020 Texas primary election started this week on February 18, which was also Educator Voting Day. Many counties saw record numbers of voters at the polls on Tuesday. The early voting period ends February 28 and Texas’s primary elections on “Super Tuesday” will be March 3, 2020. If you haven’t made it out to the polls yet, be sure to get the scoop on voting procedures and reminders! (Doesn’t that make you want ice-cream?) Also, check out the latest “Texas election roundup” blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins here.

Why vote in the primaries? ATPE’s lobbyists explained why it’s so important in this “Primary Colors” blog series for Teach the Vote. In many cases, the winning candidate is chosen in the primary rather than in the November general election, as ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell described in Part I of the series (with a list of affected races). In  Part II of “Primary Colors,” ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins explains that for educators who face imminent attacks, it is imperative to show up at the polls and make informed choices so that the next legislative session is as positive as our last.

Read up on the people running for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education this year by viewing their candidate profiles on Teach the Vote, which include responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey. ATPE does not endorse candidates and invites all candidates to participate in our survey project for Teach the Vote. If your favorite candidate has not answered our survey, please let them know it’s not too late! Encourage them to contact ATPE Governmental Relations for additional details.

 

  • Watch this instructional video to learn the different ways you can search for candidate information using Teach the Vote.
  • Learn about the non-binding ballot propositions proposed by the state Democratic and Republican parties that will appear on the primary ballot. These measures don’t affect the law, but they help state party leaders learn more about their voters’ opinions on key issues. Check out this Teach the Vote blog post for more information.
  • Read all the fantastic election features in our latest issue of ATPE News for Spring 2020.
  • Use Vote411.org to build a customized ballot that you can print out and take with you to the polls.
  • Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com to find additional election-related resources created for educators.
  • Find additional election reminders and tips on ATPE’s main blog at atpe.org.

This week, Senator Kirk Watson (D-Austin) announced his plans to resign from the Texas Senate in order to become dean of the University of Houston’s new Hobby School of Public Affairs. Watson has served in the state legislature since being elected to office in 2006, and he was a key member of the Senate Education Committee during the 2019 legislative session. Senator Watson served as mayor of Austin before setting his sights on the legislature. The race to succeed Watson could draw a number of high-profile contenders from the Austin area. State Reps. Donna Howard (D-Austin) and Celia Israel (D-Austin) each indicated this week they are not interested in running for the seat, which is in an overwhelmingly Democratic district. Gov. Greg Abbott will be required to call a special election in order to fill the Senate District 14 vacancy, which could be held on the uniform election dates in May or November of this year.


Two polls of note were released this week that show voter support for public education. A University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll found that Texas voters want increased spending for public education, and lower property taxes, and they believe the quality of Texas public education is excellent or good. Another statewide poll, commissioned by the education-focused non-profit Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation showed that 77% of Texans express trust and confidence in their teachers. Those polled also believe that teacher quality is extremely or very important in overall school quality, teachers are undervalued, teacher pay is too low, standardized tests may not be the best measure of student learning, and public schools have too little money.

These two new Texas polls are consistent with another recent national poll conducted by the National School Boards Action Center, (NSBAC) which we reported on last week. In the NSBAC poll, 64% of the respondents said funding for public schools should be increased, 73% were opposed to public spending on private, religious, and home schools, and 80% expressed favorable opinions of the teachers in their community.


ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified at the Feb. 21, 2020, SBEC meeting.

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today in Austin for its first meeting of the year. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified to urge the board to use its authority to remedy an unforeseen impact of House Bill (HB) 3 on former Master Teacher certificate holders. Under the bill’s repeal of the Master Teacher certificates, Master Teachers will no longer be able to renew their certificates and may face tricky situations trying to keep their current teaching assignments as a result. HB 3 author Rep. Dan Huberty also sent a letter to the board asking for their help in preserving the classroom expertise of Master Teachers.

Read complete details of the meeting in this comprehensive blog post from Chevalier.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) of Texas Board of Trustees also met this week in Austin, and ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter covered the meetings. Hot topics of discussion at the meetings on Thursday and Friday, February 20-21, 2020, included healthcare for active and retired educators and plans for relocating the TRS agency staff.

Read Exter’s latest blog post for Teach the Vote here for highlights of the meeting.