Tag Archives: legislative update

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 13, 2019

Here’s this week’s education news wrap-up, courtesy of the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


SBOE Committee on School Initiatives meeting, Sept. 12, 2019

This week, members of the State Board of Education (SBOE) gathered in Austin to hold a series of meetings over Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, which ATPE’s lobbyists have been attending. View the full SBOE agenda and additional information about this week’s meetings here.

To kick things off, the board on Wednesday discussed the Texas Resource Review (TRR) process, formerly known as the Instructional Materials Quality Evaluation (IMQE). Acting as a rubric for instructional materials for English Language Arts and Reading (ELAR) in grades 3-8, the TRR will serve as a type of “consumer reports”  resources for school districts and educators looking for quality instructional materials. Read a full recap of Wednesday’s board meeting in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Other topics of discussion during this week’s meetings of the board and its committees include a new procedure for nominating members to the School Land Board (SLB), the ed prep assessment pilot known as “EdTPA,” and the Generation 25 charter application that would establish charters with new operators as opposed to letting existing charter holders expand their operations. ATPE’s Wiggins has more on the discussion of these items in this blog post from Thursday.

The board will wrap up its September meetings today. The full board’s agenda for today includes hearing from Commissioner of Education Mike Morath. Read more about his remarks at today’s SBOE meeting, which covered accountability and new reading academy requirements, in this Teach the Vote blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

Commissioner of Education Mike Morath speaking to the ATPE Board of Directors, Sept. 7, 2019

The board also took time today to recognize outgoing chair Donna Bahorich for her leadership with an honorary resolution. This will be the last meeting over which Bahorich will preside, pending the governor’s naming of a new chair for the SBOE.

Related: Commissioner Mike Morath also visited the ATPE Board of Directors meeting in Pflugerville on Sept. 7, 2019. The commissioner updated the board on accountability ratings, discussed the issue of merit pay, and more.


This year’s legislative session saw a slew of bills relating to assessments, from their administration and content to their duration and much more. For an in-depth look at which laws from the 86th session will affect things like end-of-course exams, individual graduation committees (IGCs), and the length of standardized state assessments, check out this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier. On Monday, we’ll have a another new post for our ongoing “New School Year, New Laws” weekly series here on Teach the Vote. You can also learn more about many new laws affecting educators in this comprehensive digital guide compiled by ATPE’s legal staff.


The latest iteration of “HB 3 in 30,” the Texas Education Agency’s weekly video series that breaks down the signature education bill of the 86th session, focuses on reading practices. Click here to watch the most recent video and access all the prior videos in the HB 3 in 30 series.


It was announced this week that Harrison Keller will become the new Commissioner of Higher Education, following the recent retirement of Commissioner Raymund Peredes. The announcement came Wednesday after a unanimous vote by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). Keller, who assumes the post on Oct. 1, has worked for the University of Texas and was a longtime education policy adviser to a former Texas Speaker of the House, Rep. Tom Craddick (R-Midland).


ELECTION UPDATE: Yet another big retirement announcement came today with Sen. José Rodriguez (D-El Paso) announcing that he will not seek re-election. An attorney, Sen. Rodriguez has described himself as the first member of his family to attend college. He was first elected to the Senate District 29 seat in 2010 and has also chaired the Senate Democratic Caucus.

Early voting for the upcoming November election begins on Oct. 21, just five weeks from now. For more information about what’s going to be on the ballot, check out our previous Teach the Vote blog posts on proposed constitutional amendments and some special elections that will be taking place on the same day. You can also use the resources provided by the Texas Educators Vote coalition to help ensure you are ready to vote. The deadline to register to vote for the November 5 election is Oct. 7, 2019.

New School Year, New Laws: Curriculum and Instruction

When the 86th Texas Legislature convened for its 2019 regular session, members of the state Senate and House of Representatives focused much of their attention on school finance and school safety. Issues that once held center-stage in a legislative session, like accountability, vouchers, and payroll deduction took a backseat (or weren’t even in the car). However, there were several bills passed this year that will impact teachers’ bread and butter – teaching and learning. In this week’s “New School Year, New Laws” post, we will fill you in on legislative changes impacting curriculum and instruction.

House Bill (HB) 391 by Rep. César Blanco (D-El Paso): Printed instructional materials

By law, parents are entitled to request that their child be allowed to take home instructional materials. Districts and charter schools must honor this request. However, in some cases, those instructional materials are online and the parents do not have the appropriate technology at home to access them. In this event, HB 391 dictates that the district or charter school provide the materials in print, which could be printouts of the relevant electronic materials. This law became effective immediately upon its passage.

HB 2984 by Rep. Steve Allison (R-San Antonio): Technology applications TEKS

Technology applications is part of the “enrichment curriculum” offered by school districts. HB 2984 directs the State Board of Education (SBOE) to revise the grades K-8 Texas essential knowledge and skills (TEKS) for technology applications, specifically by adding in curriculum standards for coding, computer programming, computational thinking, and cybersecurity. The SBOE must complete this task by Dec. 31, 2020, so be on the lookout for information from ATPE about opportunities to participate in the process and provide public comment.

HB 3012 by Rep. James Talarico (D-Round Rock): Providing instruction to students who are suspended

Most teachers have probably experienced what happens when a student is placed in either in-school or out-of-school suspension (ISS/OSS). The student often comes back to the classroom having missed days or weeks of instruction that can be hard to make up. HB 3012 requires districts to provide suspended students with an alternative means of accessing all “foundation curriculum” or core coursework (math, science, English language arts, and social studies). The district must also provide at least one option for receiving the coursework that doesn’t require access to the Internet. Whether or not this requirement for providing coursework will trickle down to the individual teacher level is still unclear. This bill became effective immediately.

HB 4310 by Rep. Harold Dutton (D- Houston): Time for scope and sequence

HB 4310 applies to the scope and sequence created by districts for foundation curricula. Under the new law, a district must ensure sufficient time for teachers to teach and students to learn the TEKS in a given scope and sequence. Additionally, a district cannot penalize a teacher who determines that their students need more or less time and thus doesn’t follow the scope and sequence. However, the law does say that a district can take action with respect to teachers who don’t follow the scope and sequence if there is documented evidence of a deficiency in their classroom instruction. This law became effective immediately.

HB 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood): G/T programming and funding

The gifted and talented (G/T) allotment was eliminated in this year’s big school finance bill, HB 3, but the requirement that school districts provide G/T programming did not go away. When HB 3 was heard by the House Public Education and Senate Education committees, many parents and students testified on the importance of keeping gifted and talented programming and urged lawmakers to maintain the allotment. In response, Chairman Huberty and other lawmakers explained that funding for G/T through the allotment has been capped at 5% of average daily attendance, even though a district may actually enroll more than 5% of its students in G/T programs. As a result, every district essentially received the maximum amount possible. HB 3 rolls this amount into the new basic allotment as the mechanism for funding G/T, rather than having a stand-alone allotment.

To quell fears that G/T programs might disappear along with the allotment, HB 3 states that districts must provide a G/T program consistent with the state plan for G/T and must annually certify to the commissioner of education their compliance with the law. If a district does not comply, the state will revoke its funding in an amount calculated using the same formula for the old G/T allotment. The bill also requires districts to comply with the use of G/T funds as outlined in State Board of Education (SBOE) rule.

These changes to how G/T programs are funded took effect immediately upon the passage of HB 3. Learn more about the new G/T requirements and funding expectations in this “HB 3 in 30” video provided by the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

HB 4205 by Rep. Tom Craddick (R-Midland): Teacher effectiveness and value-added modeling in turnaround schools

HB 4205 was originally introduced as a bill to allow a campus in Midland ISD to be repurposed by a nonprofit entity while maintaining the same student population. As the bill made its way through the legislative process, it was expanded beyond Midland ISD and amended to include language from Senate Bill (SB) 1412 by Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock) regarding accelerated campus excellence (ACE) plans. ACE is a campus turnaround option that prescribes personnel, compensation, and programming decisions meant to improve student performance. A last-stage amendment also added a requirement that personnel decisions under a school’s ACE turnaround plan must be made using a value-added model (VAM) for determining instructional effectiveness. After this change was made, which ATPE opposed, the House unfortunately voted to concur in the Senate amendments and the bill was signed by the Governor.

Under the final version of HB 4205 as passed, at least 60 percent of teachers assigned to the campus must have demonstrated instructional effectiveness during the previous school year. For teachers who taught in the same district in the prior year, this effectiveness standard is to be determined by classroom observation and assessing the teacher’s impact on student growth using VAM based on at least one student assessment instrument selected by the district. For teachers who did not teach in the district the previous year, instructional effectiveness will be determined by data and other evidence indicating that if the teacher had taught in the district, they would have been ranked among the top half of teachers there. Teacher pay under this type of plan must include a three-year commitment to provide “significant incentives” to compensate high-performing principals and teachers.

In the 2019-20 school year, the ACE provisions in HB 4205 will only apply to one district that received an unacceptable rating for 2017-18, as chosen by the commissioner of education. In 2020-21, the ACE option under HB 4205 will open up to all districts that have been required to complete a campus turnaround plan.

There are many aspects of this new law that ATPE opposes, which we expressed to lawmakers through oral testimony and written input on SB 1412 and HB 4205 as they were moving through the legislative process earlier this year. Our opposition was based on the following formal positions that have been adopted by ATPE members:

  • ATPE opposes the use of student performance, including test scores, as the primary measure of a teacher’s effectiveness, as the determining factor for a teacher’s compensation, or as the primary rationale for an adverse employment action.
  • ATPE believes students’ state-level standardized test scores should not be a component of teacher evaluations until such time as they can be validated through a consensus of independent research and peer review for that purpose.
  • ATPE opposes the use of value-added modeling or measurement (VAM) at the individual teacher level for teacher evaluation purposes or decisions about continued employment of teachers. (Learn more about our VAM concerns here.)
  • ATPE supports incorporating measures of student growth at the campus level or higher into evaluations of educators as long as the measures are developed with educator input, piloted, and deemed statistically reliable.
  • ATPE opposes incentive or performance pay programs unless they are designed in an equitable and fair manner as determined by educators on a campus basis.

Your ATPE Governmental Relations team will be monitoring these pieces of legislation as they are implemented.


Next Monday, we will continue ATPE’s “New School Year, New Laws” series here on Teach the Vote with a post on assessment-related bills passed during the 2019 legislative session.

Breaking news: Governor releases Texas School Safety Update

Gov. Greg Abbott released his 23-page Texas School Safety Update today. As we have reported here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog, Gov. Abbott convened a series of roundtable discussions on the issues of school shootings and school safety following the tragic shooting that occurred last year at Santa Fe High School. The governor also designated school safety as an emergency item for the 86th Texas Legislature to work on during the 2019 legislative session. 

The Texas School Safety Update is aimed largely at highlighting in one document the funding and policy decisions that have been made over the last two years to address school safety. Entitled “Improving School Safety in Texas,” the report shared with the public today details both legislative and administrative actions that have been taken at least partly in response to the governor’s focus on school safety and his recommendations for dealing with the issue. View the full report here.

New School Year, New Laws: School Safety

In the aftermath of the shooting at Santa Fe High School in May 2018, Gov. Greg Abbott hosted a series of roundtable discussions to gather input from students, teachers, lawmakers, law enforcement and other stakeholders, including ATPE state officers, on how to prevent such a tragedy from reoccurring. Additionally, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick created the Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Security, which held a series of hearings to generate legislative recommendations. Both the roundtables and the hearings considered issues ranging from hardening school facilities to mental health to gun control. Similar discussions are taking place now in a new set of roundtable discussions convened by Gov. Abbott following another shooting in El Paso this month.

At the start of the 86th Legislative Session, Gov. Abbott gave school safety and mental health legislation special expedited status by declaring these issues as emergency items. Lawmakers then deliberated on these issues and passed several bills aimed at helping to prevent future tragedies involving violence in schools. In this week’s installment of “New School Year, New Laws,” we will fill you in on some changes you can expect in your school when it comes to safety.

The following bills go into effect in the 2019-20 school year:

Senate Bill (SB) 11 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood): Omnibus School Safety Bill

SB 11, which was effective with Gov. Abbott’s signature on June 6, 2019, made a big policy statement about how Texas “thinks” about school safety. The bill emphasizes student mental health and incorporates many strategies to address the psychological factors of school violence in addition to other practices, such as school hardening and emergency preparedness. Here are some ways the bill could impact you:

School safety allotment: Districts are set to receive $100 million over the next two years from a new “school safety allotment.” These funds are estimated at $9.72 per student in average daily attendance and can be used to secure facilities, purchase security technology, hire security and mental health personnel, and provide training (including programs to address adverse childhood experiences).

Training and professional development: Since 2005, districts have been required to create multi-hazard emergency operations plans to address preparedness (including employee training) and responses to a variety of emergency situations, such as weather events. SB 11 adds a requirement that these plans cover a variety of new preparedness provisions, including ensuring employee training for suicide prevention, psychological first aid, and grief-informed and trauma-informed care. District employees, including substitute teachers, must also be trained in responding to an emergency.

Campus changes: Employees must have classroom access to a telephone or other communication device that allows for immediate contact with emergency services. Additionally, each campus will be required to establish a threat assessment and safe and supportive school team. Team members must include those with expertise in classroom instruction, special education, counseling, and school administration, among others.

Read our session recap coverage of SB 11 in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins for more information.

House Bill (HB) 19 by Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo): Mental Health Resources

HB 19 utilizes local mental health authorities (LMHAs) to provide mental health resources to public schools. LMHAs are community mental health centers that contract with Texas Health and Human Services to provide services to specific geographic areas. (Find your LMHA here). Under HB 19, LMHAs will employ a non-physician mental health professional to collaborate with the Education Service Center (ESC) in their region and serve as a mental health and substance use resource for that ESC’s school districts. HB 19 is effective on Sept. 1, 2019. This means you might start to see the mental health professional providing training for school district personnel early this school year, if your district has decided to participate in the program. The mental health professional is required to provide monthly training on mental health first aid, the effects of grief and trauma, and substance abuse prevention and intervention. The legislature appropriated $4.6 million dollars to provide grants in order to implement this bill.

HB 1387 by Rep. Cole Hefner (R-Mount Pleasant): Removing the Cap on School Marshals

In 2013, the 83rd Texas Legislature created the school marshal program. School marshals are employees, such as teachers and principals, who are appointed by the governing body of public school districts, charter schools, two-year public junior colleges, and private schools. The individual must have a valid license to carry firearms, pass a psychological exam, and complete an 80-hour school marshal course. Due to the secretive nature of the program (marshals are anonymous), it is unclear exactly how many school marshals there are in Texas or how many districts are participating. Since the enactment of the law, the number of school marshals in a district has been limited to the greater of either one marshal per 200 students in average daily attendance per campus or one marshal per building of the campus where students are regularly being taught. Under HB 1387, this limit on the number of marshals is removed. This law goes into effect Sept. 1, 2019.

HB 2195 by Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Highland Park): Active Shooter Policy and Training

HB 2195 adds that district multi-hazard emergency plans should also include a policy for responding to an active shooter and that school district peace officers or resource officers must complete an active shooter response training. This law took effect immediately after it was signed by the governor on June 14, 2019.

The following bill will begin to impact educators in the 2020-21 school year:

HB 18 by Rep. Price (R-Amarillo): Public School Mental Health Training, Curriculum, and Continuing Education

HB 18 addresses school safety with a focus on professional development and curriculum regarding student mental health and substance abuse. Here are some ways the bill might impact you in the near future.

Training and professional development: HB 18 will affect professional development by adding required training on students receiving special education or Section 504 services, students who are engaged in substance abuse or those with mental health conditions, and students with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Under HB 18, these mandatory topics and others already in state law must comprise at least 25 percent of the five-year training cycle. Current law limits them to not more than 25 percent. Educators will also get double the credit hours for completing an evidence-based continuing education program in mental health first aid or grief-informed and trauma-informed care. In 2020-21, district-provided staff development can include positive behavior intervention and supports and must include training on suicide prevention, responding to grief and trauma, recognizing the signs of mental health conditions, bullying, and strategies for positive relationships among students.

Curriculum: Effective Dec. 1, 2019, the health curriculum that may be offered in your school will integrate mental and physical health instruction, to include skills such as managing emotions and maintaining positive relationships. If you are a health teacher, get ready to see the State Board of Education propose new curriculum standards (TEKS) that include science, risk factors, and causes of substance abuse.

Though HB 18 will be effective on Dec. 1, 2019, any new requirements on school districts will not take effect until the 2020-21 school year.


Next Monday, re-visit the Teach the Vote blog for ATPE’s next post in this series: Curriculum and Instruction.

New School Year, New Laws: Student Discipline

As you re-enter the school building this year, it will be important to know how the more than 80 bills passed during the recent Texas legislative session will impact you and your students. Besides the obvious – the high-profile House Bill (HB) 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) offering many schools and educators additional funding and a potential salary bump – there were a number of other bills passed in 2019 that will affect areas such as student discipline, charter schools, safety, and testing.

ATPE’s lobbyists will be here on Teach the Vote blogging about major bills in these areas every Monday over the next few weeks as part of our “New School Year, New Laws” series. This week, we will discuss changes you will see in your school due to new discipline-related legislation.

Senate Bill (SB) 2432: Student behavior towards teachers

SB 2432 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood) allows for students who harass teachers to be removed to a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP). Harassment is defined in Section 42.07 of the Texas Penal Code in several ways, each with an overall intent to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, or embarrass another. This bill takes effect on Sept. 1, 2019.

SB 712/HB 3630: Prohibiting aversive techniques on students

SB 712 by Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville) and HB 3630 by Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Highland Park) are identical bills that prohibit the use of certain techniques on students that are meant to discourage recurring behaviors. These aversive techniques are defined in physical terms, such as inflicting pain on a student, as well as in social, emotional, and mental terms, such as verbally demeaning a student or using a timeout when such breaks are not a part of the student’s individualized education plan (IEP). This legislation does not affect a teacher’s ability to remove students under Texas Education Code Section 37.002, which allows teachers to remove students who are repetitively disruptive and limiting the learning of others. Both bills were effective immediately upon their passage earlier this year.

HB 692: Suspension of students who are homeless

HB 692 by Rep. James White (R-Hillister) prohibits a school district or charter school from placing a student who is homeless in out-of-school suspension, with certain exceptions for serious offenses. The bill allows the campus behavior coordinator to work with the district’s homeless liaison to help identify alternatives to out-of-school suspension for students who are homeless. This bill was also effective immediately upon passage.

HB 811: Discipline of students who are homeless

HB 811, also by Rep. White (R-Hillister), requires a school district board of trustees to include in their code of conduct certain provisions relative to students who may be homeless. Specifically, when determining student suspension, expulsion, or removal to a DAEP or Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP), consideration shall be given to whether a student is in the conservatorship of the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) or is homeless. This bill was effective immediately upon passage.

It is important for educators to know how this legislation will impact their rights as educators, their classroom practice, and their students’ rights. Please see the recently released To The Administrator Addressed correspondence from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) for more legislative changes affecting student discipline.


Be sure to watch for a new Teach the Vote blog post next week on more changes coming to your school as a result of the 2019 Texas legislative session.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 26, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


This week Congressman Kevin Brady (R-TX) filed H.R. 3934, the “Equal Treatment of Public Servants Act of 2019.” The ETPSA aims to address unfair reductions to the Social Security benefits for many educators and other public employees under what is known as the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP).

While there are many similarities between this WEP replacement bill and a previous version of the ETPSA filed by Brady in the last congress, H.R. 3934 would produce a higher benefit payment for the majority of retirees, including those future retirees who are over the age of 20. For more details on the newly filed bill, check out this blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


Today, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is meeting to discuss several important items, including the adoption of changes to allow for the implementation of the EdTPA portfolio assessment pilot for teacher certification. The board is also discussing pending rule changes resulting from bills passed by the 86th Legislature, such as the repeal of the Master Teacher certificates within HB 3. Check the Teach the Vote blog later this weekend for a more detailed summary of the meeting by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


ELECTION UPDATE: November is right around the corner. Are you registered and ready to vote? This week the Secretary of State revealed the ballot order for constitutional amendments that voters will consider in November 2019, including one that pertains to education funding. Learn more about the proposed amendment, along with updates on campaign announcements for the 2020 primary elections in this new election update post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


In Washington, DC, the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs held a hearing on school safety on Thursday, July 25, 2019. The specific focus of yesterday’s hearing was on examining state and federal recommendations for enhancing school safety against targeted violence. The committee heard from four invited witnesses: Max Schachter and Tom Hoyer, who are both parents of children killed in the Parkland School shooting; Bob Gualtieri, Sheriff of Pinellas County, Florida; and Deborah Temkin, PH.D., Senior Program Area Director, Education Child Trends. Mr. Hoyer identified three areas where policymakers can impact school safety, particularly with regard to school shootings: securing the school campus, improving mental health screening and support programs, and supporting responsible firearms ownership. Committee members focused their questions and attention on the first two issues. Archived video of the hearing and the testimony of the individual witnesses can be found at the links above.

Congressman Kevin Brady files WEP replacement bill, version 2.0

U.S. Representative Kevin Brady (R-TX), the ranking member of the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee, has introduced H.R. 3934, the “Equal Treatment of Public Servants Act of 2019,” considered a new and improved version of the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) replacement bill he filed during the previous congressional session.

U.S. Rep. Kevin Brady

The new version of the bill keeps many of the same provisions in place as its predecessor. For example, the new Public Servants Fairness formula (PSF) proposed in the bill would increase the overall amount in Social Security checks received by most future retired Texas teachers who would otherwise be subject to the WEP under current law. H.R. 3934 also maintains the previous legislation’s provision granting a $100 per month rebate to current retirees whose Social Security benefits are reduced by the WEP.

The primary change between the new version of the bill and the last is a greatly expanded hold harmless period. Under the new legislation, anyone over the age of 20 but not yet eligible for Social Security before the year 2022 would get the higher of the benefit amount provided by either the old WEP formula or the new PSF formula. For the vast majority of affected retirees, the new formula would produce a higher benefit payment except for a few current or future educators over the age of 20 who could otherwise see a slight reduction under the new formula; for the educators who fall into that relatively small category, Brady’s bill would hold them harmless, ensuring that their benefit will be no less than they would otherwise receive under current law.

H.R. 6933 / H.R. 3934 Comparison Chart

With 18 months left for the current congress to pass the bill, ATPE is hopeful that the time for WEP reform may finally be at hand. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates on this legislation.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 12, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Commissioner of Education Mike Morath

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) invited education stakeholders, including ATPE, to a meeting with Commissioner Mike Morath on Monday to go over the agency’s plan for providing public information on the implementation of the tax compression and school finance bill, House Bill (HB) 3. The commissioner walked attendees through a high-level presentation on the various aspects of the 300-page bill that will be enacted over the coming months and years, including subjects related to teacher training and compensation.

The gist is that the agency has created an informational website and will be releasing a new video each week discussing a single topic of HB 3. This week, the agency released a new video detailing changes to the compensatory education allotment, which provides funding for economically disadvantaged students. You can watch that video here. Read your ATPE Governmental Relations team’s full post on Monday’s meeting here.


The Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS) board of trustees will be in Austin next week, July 18-19, for a regularly scheduled board meeting. Of note at this particular meeting, the board will decide the timing for delivery of the 13th check that will be delivered to retirees as a result of the passage of Senate Bill (SB) 12. Board materials and a link to a live stream of the meeting can found here.


ATPE is headed to Houston next week for the 2019 Summit, where educators from every corner of Texas will come together, elect ATPE state officers, and set our association’s policy agenda for the next year.

Members will enjoy valuable opportunities to network and make friends with colleagues across the state, as well as learn about important legislation and earn CPE credit. The ATPE Governmental Relations team will be presenting an update on what happened during the 86th legislative session, as well as what you can do to stay engaged and make sure the state follows through on promises made to educators in 2019. ATPE’s Washington, DC-based lobbyist, David Pore, will also participate in the legislative update for members, addressing federal issues of interest to the education community.

If you’ll be attending the ATPE Summit, we look forward to seeing you there!


TEA begins deep dives on HB 3 topics

The Texas Education Agency held an information session Monday, July 8, 2019, in which Commissioner of Education Mike Morath briefed education stakeholders, including ATPE’s lobbyists, on various components of House Bill (HB) 3 that will be rolling out over the next several months.

As the session’s major tax compression and school finance bill, HB 3 orders the state and school districts to implement several programmatic changes over the coming months and years. In order to make the process more transparent, TEA has created an HB 3 resource website, which you can view here.

DEEP DIVES

TEA’s website is intended to host a number of “deep dive” updates on various components of HB 3, with a new deep dive posted every week. One of the first is an update on master teacher certifications, which are being phased out as a result of HB 3. The ATPE Governmental Relations team has received several questions about what will happen to teachers who are currently certified as reading masters. The long and short of it is that all master certificates will be converted to “legacy” master certificates and remain valid until their expiration date. Current master teachers should consider whether their underlying certifications are aligned to their current teaching assignments and may reach out to ATPE or TEA with any questions. The official TEA guidance on the subject can be viewed here. The agency’s next deep dive will address compensatory education and is scheduled for release this Thursday, July 11, on the TEA’s HB 3 website. A list of scheduled deep dives can be found here.

SCHOOL FINANCE

The school finance bill should provide additional funding for most districts, worth an average of $635 more per average daily attendance (ADA). Along with the new funding, HB 3 orders school districts to do several things and suggests they do several more. Commissioner Morath conceded to stakeholders Monday that the state has not calculated whether the additional funding schools receive will be enough to do all of what they are being asked, and he indicated that it is likely that roughly 15 school districts will not receive sufficient funding to cover the increase in the educator minimum salary schedule (MSS) mandated under HB 3.

TEACHER PAY

Under HB 3, districts will have the option of accessing a “teacher incentive allotment” if they develop a local program to offer differentiated pay based on teacher quality. This allotment may provide participating districts from $3,000 to $32,000 in additional funding per teacher who qualifies under an approved local program, but it is important to note that this funding will not go directly to the teacher. Instead, that money will go to the district with the requirement that 90 percent of it be spent on compensation for teachers at the participating campus. Schools with existing programs will likely see additional funding in September 2020 for programs in effect during the upcoming school year, and new programs will likely be eligible to receive funding by 2021.

OTHER RULES IMPACTING EDUCATORS

The school finance bill also expanded the “do not hire registry” of public school educators who have been convicted of an inappropriate relationship to non-certified employees. This change is effective immediately, and a deep dive on this topic is scheduled to be released by TEA before the start of the fall semester.

Every teacher in kindergarten through grade 3 must attend a reading academy within the next three years at the school district’s expense. Each academy is expected to include a five-day summer institute, two days of pull-outs, and 12 coaching sessions during the year, plus three days the following summer. Educators will not receive a state stipend for attendance, but the agency indicated there is an expectation that districts will provide them with a stipend. All future K-3 educators will be required to cover the reading academy’s curriculum before placement, which means reading academy instruction will transfer to educator preparation programs (EPPs) going into the future.

New teachers certified for pre-K through grade 6 will also be required to demonstrate proficiency in the science of teaching reading (STR) by January 1, 2021. The agency is currently working on a test for STR proficiency.

OUTCOMES FUNDING

Districts may receive additional outcomes-based funding under HB 3 for each annual graduate above a certain threshold percentage who checks a box indicating they are college, career, or military ready (CCMR). Districts are expected to receive money this year for Class of 2018 graduates.

ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL DAYS

HB 3 allows schools to add instructional days beyond the current minimum of 180 days up to 210 days. These days will not be subject to compulsory attendance and will be optional at each district’s discretion. The funding will not cover the full cost of operating schools on those days, and the agency acknowledged that many districts may simply use this program to subsidize their existing summer school programs.

You can view the complete slide deck TEA presented to stakeholders on Monday by clicking here. This slide deck includes graphical presentations on many of HB 3’s main components. The agency will continue to produce informational content each week, with compensatory education scheduled for this week and pre-K scheduled for next week. You can see what the agency has already published by clicking on the HB 3 resource page.

TEA rolls out resource website for HB 3, school finance changes

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) is rolling out a new website and video series to try and explain the various components of House Bill (HB) 3, the major school finance bill passed by the 86th Texas Legislature this year.

At more than 300 pages in length, HB 3 sets in motion a significant number of policy changes that will have marked effects on schools and classrooms. Among these changes is language in the bill that directs school districts that see a substantial increase in school funding as a result of HB 3 to dedicate some of that new funding to increasing compensation for school employees, with priority given to classroom teachers with more than five years of experience.

In the month that passed since HB 3 became law, some districts have awarded raises for school employees, although it’s unclear whether HB 3 was the catalyst. Many districts will await further guidance from TEA before implementing the compensation sections of HB 3 in order to know exactly how they are expected to distribute any new funding and what form the additional compensation may take — i.e. salary, healthcare and retirement contributions, or other benefits that carry a dollar value.

To answer questions like these for the general public, TEA has set up an HB 3 information website that can be found here. The website currently hosts an introductory video by Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath. The agency plans to release a series of 30-minute videos entitled “HB3 in 30,” each of which is intended to explain specific components of HB 3. According to a press release from the agency:

“Videos will be released every Thursday and will be accompanied by supporting documents available for download. A full schedule of weekly release dates, a summary of HB3, frequently asked questions, and implementation guidance for school districts can be found on the TEA House Bill 3 information site.

The first video in the series, an overview of Budget Planning for Teacher Compensation, is scheduled for release on Thursday, June 26.”

Districts will continue to receive formal guidance documents from TEA, the first round of which was released earlier this month. Links to these documents are also provided at the bottom of the HB 3 information site.

For more on the anticipated impact of HB 3, be sure to check out the ATPE Governmental Relations team’s comprehensive analysis of the bill here on Teach the Vote.