Tag Archives: house public education

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Feb. 22, 2019

In addition to preparing for the upcoming ATPE at the Capitol events this weekend, your ATPE lobbyists were once again busy covering legislative happenings in and around the Capitol this week. Here’s a look at this week’s developments:


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) held ts first meeting of 2019 today in Austin. The board took action on several items, including a new superintendent certificate program to be offered by the Harris County Department of Education and approval of new standards for the English as a Second Language (ESL) supplemental certificate. The board also heard lengthy testimony on the upcoming EdTPA performance-based assessment pilot included within the Teacher Certification Redesign plan, which led to a discussion of concerns among the majority of the board. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier attended today’s meeting and will be posting a full wrap-up of the discussions for our blog in the coming days.

 


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) Board of Trustees also met this week. For highlights of the board’s discussions, check out this blog post from ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, who attended the meetings on Thursday and Friday, Feb. 21-22.

 


The House Public Education Committee began hearing bills this week. Members considered bills on public education topics including pre-K class sizes, educator preparation, assessment, and special education. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified for the first time before the committee in support of a bill that would improve and pay for mentoring programs. ATPE supported seven out of the 11 bills on the agenda. For more on the hearing, read this blog post by Chevalier.

 


On Wednesday, Feb. 20, the House Appropriations Committee’s Article III subcommittee met to continue its review of the state education budget. The subcommittee heard from te leaders of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and Teacher Retirement System (TRS) before inviting stakeholders to weigh in on the topic of education funding. ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testified about the need to prioritize funding for public education this session as well shoring up the TRS pension fund. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates as budget talks continue this session.

 


On Sunday and Monday, hundreds of educators will arrive in Austin for ATPE at the Capitol, our biennial legislative advocacy and political involvement training event. ATPE members will spend Sunday attending training sessions on the association’s legislative priorities and hearing from elected officials about efforts to reform the state’s school finance system, among other education issues. On Monday, ATPE members will visit with their legislators and watch the House and Senate in action.

Tonja Gray

Also happening on Monday, the Senate Finance Committee will hold a public hearing on Senate Bill (SB) 3, which aims to increase funding for public schools and give teachers a $5,000 raise. ATPE State Vice President Tonja Gray will be giving invited testimony at the hearing. Follow @TeachtheVote on Twitter for updates on Monday’s hearing and watch for a full recap of the event next week here on our Teach the Vote blog.

 


House releases committee assignments for the 86th Legislature

Earlier today, the Office of Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen (R-Angleton) released the committee assignments for the 86th session of the Texas House. Of particular interest to the education community during a session that already appears heavily focused on school finance reform, Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) retains his chairmanship of the House Public Education Committee, and Rep. John Zerwas (R-Fulshear) will continue to chair the House Appropriations Committee.

The list below contains the names of the Chair and Vice-Chair of each respective committee, while the full committee lists for the House can be viewed here:

Agriculture & Livestock 

  • Rep. Drew Springer (R-Muenster), Chair
  • Rep. Charles “Doc” Anderson (R-Waco), Vice-Chair

Appropriations

  • Rep. John Zerwas (R-Katy), Chair
  • Rep. Oscar Longoria (D-Mission), Vice-Chair

Business & Industry 

  • Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio), Chair
  • Rep. Drew Darby (R-San Angelo), Vice-Chair

Calendars

  • Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo), Chair
  • Rep. Joseph Moody (D-El Paso), Vice Chair

Corrections

  • Rep. James White (R-Hillister), Chair
  • Rep. Alma Allen (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

County Affairs 

  • Rep. Garnet Coleman (D-Houston), Chair
  • Rep. Dwayne Bohac (R-Houston), Vice-Chair

Criminal Jurisprudence 

  • Rep. Nicole Collier (D-Fort Worth), Chair
  • Rep. William “Bill” Zedler (R-Arlington), Vice-Chair

Culture, Recreation & Tourism

  • Rep. John Cyrier (R-Lockhart), Chair
  • Rep. Armando Martinez (D-Weslaco), Vice-Chair

Defense & Veterans’ Affairs 

  • Rep. Dan Flynn (R-Canton), Chair
  • Rep. Tony Tinderholt (R-Arlington), Vice-Chair

Elections

  • Rep. Stephanie Klick ( R-Fort Worth), Chair
  • Rep. Philip Cortez (D-San Antonio), Vice-Chair

Energy Resources 

  • Rep. Chris Paddie (R-Marshall), Chair
  • Rep. Abel Herrero (D-Robstown), Vice-Chair

Environmental Regulation 

  • Rep. J.M. Lozano (R-Kingsville), Chair
  • Rep. Ed Thompson (R-Brazoria), Vice-Chair

General Investigating 

  • Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Dallas), Chair
  • Rep. Nicole Collier (D-Fort Worth), Vice-Chair

Higher Education 

  • Rep. Chris Turner (D-Tarrant), Chair
  • Rep. Lynn Stucky (R-Denton), Vice-Chair

Homeland Security & Public Safety 

  • Rep. Poncho Nevarez (D-Eagle Pass), Chair
  • Rep. Paul Dennis (R-Houston), Vice-Chair

House Administration 

  • Rep. Charlie Geren (R-Fort Worth), Chair
  • Rep. Donna Howard (D-Austin), Vice-Chair

Human Services 

  • Rep. James Frank (R-Wichita Falls), Chair
  • Rep. Gina Hinojosa (D-Austin), Vice-Chair

Insurance 

  • Rep. Eddie Lucio III (D-Brownsville), Chair
  • Rep. Tom Oliverson (R-Cypress), Vice-Chair

International Relations & Economic Development 

  • Rep. Rafael Anchia (D-Dallas), Chair
  • Rep. John Frullo (R-Lubbock), Vice-Chair

Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence 

  • Rep. Jeff Leach (R-Plano), Chair
  • Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

Juvenile Justice & Family Issues 

  • Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston), Chair
  • Rep. Andrew Murr (R-Junction), Vice-Chair

Land & Resource Management 

  • Rep. Tom Craddick (R-Midland), Chair
  • Rep. Sergio Munoz Jr. (D-Palmview), Vice-Chair

Licensing & Administrative Records

  • Rep. Tracy King (D-Uvalde), Chair
  • Rep. Craig Goldman (R-Fort Worth), Vice-Chair

Local & Consent Calendars

  • Rep. Geanie W. Morrison (R-Victoria) Chair
  • Rep. Mary Gonzalez (D-El Paso), Vice-Chair

Natural Resources 

  • Rep. Lyle Larson (R-San Antonio), Chair
  • Rep. Will Metcalf (R-Conroe), Vice-Chair

Pensions, Investments, & Financial Services 

  • Rep. Jim Murphy (R-Houston), Chair
  • Rep. Hubert Vo (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

Public Education

  • Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), Chair
  • Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio), Vice-Chair

Public Health

  • Rep. Senfronia Thompson (D-Harris), Chair
  • Rep. John Wray (R-Waxahachie), Vice-Chair

Redistricting 

  • Rep. Phil King (R-Parker), Chair
  • Rep. Chris Turner (D-Tarrant), Vice-Chair

Resolutions Calendars 

  • Rep. Ryan Guillen (D-Rio Grande City), Chair
  • Rep. Rick Miller (R-Sugar Land), Vice-Chair

State Affairs 

  • Rep. Dade Phelan (R-Beaumont), Chair
  • Rep. Ana Hernandez (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

Transportation 

  • Rep. Terry Canales (D-Edinburg), Chair
  • Rep. Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa), Vice-Chair

Urban Affairs 

  • Rep. Angie Chen Button (R-Richardson), Chair
  • Rep. Matt Shaheen (R-Plano), Vice Chair

Ways & Means

  • Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock), Chair
  • Rep. Ryan Guillen (D-Rio Grande City), Vice Chair

Again, a full list of the complete House committee assignments for 2019 can be found here. Also, view the Senate committee assignments for this session here.

 

House releases public education recommendations

The House Committee on Public Education issued its interim report this month, which serves as a summary of testimony taken during the interim and includes a set of recommendations for the 86th Texas Legislature to take up.

The 88-page report addresses the response to Hurricane Harvey, teacher compensation, student assessment, students with disabilities, charter schools, implementation of legislation passed by the 85th Texas Legislature, educator preparation programs, and school safety.

Chairman Dan Huberty (R-Houston) thanked members of the committee for their work, noting, “the extraordinary events that occurred since the last session adjourned spurred members to delve deeply into what some may view as difficult topics without the time constraints of a legislative session.”

Hurricane Harvey

Recommendations include making local education agencies (LEA) whole for financial losses due to enrollment changes, property value decline, and facility damage. The report suggests the committee consider possible legislation to help schools quickly access replacement instructional materials, provide timely assistance to Chapter 42 districts that experience facility damage, and improve the Texas Education Agency’s (TEA) dropout calculation methodology.

Teacher Compensation

Recommendations include creating an additional certification for teachers in leadership positions, such as “Master Teachers,” to allow for career growth without having to leave the classroom and move to administration. The committee also recommends creating new allotments through the Foundation School Program (FSP) to fund mentoring programs and to provide differentiated compensation plans. The report specifies:

TEA should create at least two compensation plan options for use by LEAs that do not have the capacity or desire to develop their own version. While LEAs should be allowed the flexibility to create programs that benefit their own particular circumstances, locally-designed programs should be required to include the following components:

1. a multiple measure evaluation system, such as the state-developed Texas Teacher
Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS);
2. incentives to encourage top performing teachers to work at campuses with the highest
need students;
3. a requirement for top performing teachers to serve as mentors and that at least first and
second year teachers are assigned a mentor; and
4. stipends for teachers or teacher candidates that participate in additional, rigorous training
such as clinical residency programs or the National Board-certification process.

Student Assessment 

Recommendations include supporting efforts by the State Board of Education (SBOE) to streamline the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), limiting STAAR to readiness standards, making individual graduation committees (IGC) for students who have difficulties with the STAAR permanently available, eliminating high stakes testing for elementary and middle school students, splitting the STAAR in early grades into subtests scheduled on separate days, and providing funding to continue the Writing Assessment Pilot Program.

Students with Disabilities

Recommendations include monitoring TEA implementation of the corrective action plan and Strategic Plan for Special Education, providing additional funding for dyslexia identification and instruction, monitoring for the potential negative impact of changes under the Student Health and Related Services (SHARS) program, and extending funding for dyslexia and autism pilot programs.

Charter Schools 

Recommendations include requiring expansion amendment requests for additional campuses or sites to be sent to TEA and notice given to districts at least a year before a new campus is openened, ensuring uniformity among which district officials receive expansion amendment notifications, reconsidering current laws that allow charters to exclude students based on disciplinary history, ensuring charters have the ability to fulfill their responsibilities towards students with disabilities before authorization, reducing funding disparities between charters and traditional school districts, and expanding the Texas Partnership program.

Implementation of Legislation 

The report focuses on the implementation of anti-cyberbullying legislation under House Bill (HB) 179, known as David’s Law, and to changes to the accountability system under HB 22. Regarding the accountability system, recommendations include monitoring the inclusion of extra- and co-curricular indicators and local accountability systems, revisiting certain college, career, and military readiness (CCMR) indicators, exploring options to alleviate timing issues that exist with regard to the accountability system and rulemaking, and including additional funding to cover the costs of federally-mandated SAT and ACT assessments for certain students.

Educator Preparation Programs

Recommendations include monitoring TEA implementation of the educator preparation program (EPP) data dashboard, collecting disaggregated longitudinal data on student outcomes of teachers by EPP, and incentivizing EPP partnerships that provide affordable options to gain additional credentials and certifications.

School Safety

In response to the deadly school shootings in Santa Fe, Texas, and elsewhere, the committee’s report includes four pages of recommendations regarding school safety. The recommendations are broken in subcategories covering mental health and well-being, school mental health professionals, school safety planning and training, school safety infrastructure, law enforcement resources, and charter school specific issues.

These recommendations are expected to become the basis of major bills that move through the House Public Education Committee this session. Under new House rules adopted Wednesday, the committee will expand to 13 members from 11. The committee’s chair and membership for this session will be assigned by newly-elected Speaker Dennis Bonnen (R-Angleton). The full interim report can be accessed here.

House report focuses on school safety resources

The House Committee on Public Education released its preliminary school safety report this week, the result of several hearings on the matter held over the course of the summer.

The full report, which can be read here, joins similar reports released by the Senate and Gov. Greg Abbott. The House report is notable in that it focuses on providing state funding to ensure schools have the resources to prevent future tragedies such as the school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas.

The office of committee chairman state Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Houston) highlights specific funding recommendations for the following:

  • Increasing the number of counselors, psychologists and social workers available to students;
  • Increasing the amount of training received by school personnel, including threat
    assessment, Mental Health First Aid and training related to emergency operations;
  • Studying communication interoperability among schools, law enforcement and first
    responders;
  • Improving the integration of mental health services and student access to these
    services, especially in underserved areas.

“As we look for ways to improve school safety, we need to find a balance between making campuses safe but also healthy learning environments,” Chairman Huberty said in a press release. “Our students deserve to have schools where they feel safe but not imprisoned. The state can assist these efforts by providing resources for more school counselors and increased student access to mental health services, in addition to campus safety improvements and increased law enforcement or school marshals.”

“In the long run, we are better off spending resources on trying to prevent such tragedies rather than just being prepared for the next one to happen,” Chairman Huberty added.

The 14-page report includes suggestions under the topics of mental health and well-being, school mental health professionals, school safety planning and training, school security infrastructure, and law enforcement resources. You can read the full recommendations by clicking here.