Tag Archives: hd 28

November 2019 election results: Runoffs ahead

The results from Tuesday’s elections are in, and all three special elections to fill unexpired terms in the Texas House of Representatives will head to runoffs. Voters also approved all but one of the 10 proposed constitutional amendments.

In Fort Bend County, lone Democrat Eliz Markowitz came in first for the special election in Texas House District (HD) 28 with 39 percent of the vote. Markowitz, who is endorsed by the pro-public education organization Texas Parent PAC, will head to a runoff against Republican Gary Gates, who carried 28 percent of the vote. You can read more about the race for HD 28 in this TeachTheVote.org post.

In Houston’s HD 148, Democrat Anna Eastman led a crowded field with 18 percent of the vote, according to numbers available early Wednesday morning. She will face Republican Luis La Rotta, who took 17 percent of the vote.

In HD 100 in Dallas, Democrat Lorraine Birabil will likely face fellow Democrat James Armstrong in a runoff. The two earned 33 percent and 21 percent of the vote, respectively.

You can read more reporting on the special election races in this Texas Tribune post.

Voters rejected statewide Proposition 1, which would have allowed selected municipal court judges to serve multiple municipalities at the same time, while passing the other nine constitutional propositions, including Propositions 4 and 7, which included some impact on public education. Seventy-three percent of voters approved Proposition 4, which added additional hurdles to passing a state income tax beyond existing constitutional prohibitions. Voters also approved Proposition 7, which will allow the State Board of Education (SBOE) and School Land Board (SLB) more flexibility in releasing distributions to the Available School Fund (ASF). You can read more about the information we provided on the proposed constitutional amendments in this TeachTheVote.org post. Per its member-created legislative program, ATPE took no position on any of the constitutional ballot propositions. Read more about the constitutional election results in this Texas Tribune post.

If you voted in the November 2019 elections, great job! Voting in these off-year elections is incredibly important as turnout is usually very low and important statewide decisions are made by a relatively small number of people. Sign up for reminders from our partners at the Texas Educators Vote coalition, and you’ll never worry about missing an important election. Then stay tuned for more election-related news here at Teach the Vote.

Texas election roundup: Last day to vote early

Early voting ends today in the statewide Texas constitutional election, as well as three special elections: one in Dallas and two in the Houston area.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, 542,000 out of nearly 16 million registered voters had voted by mail or in person by the time polls closed on Wednesday. This puts total statewide turnout around 3.4 percent. In Fort Bend County, the site of the House District (HD) 28 special election that could prove a bellwether race between Democrats and Republicans, turnout through Wednesday was 4.4 percent.

Candidates in the special elections were required to turn in their 8-day out campaign finance reports this week. Lone Democrat Eliz Markowitz, who has been endorsed by pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC, out-raised the rest of the field combined during the 30-day period between September 27 and October 26. Markowitz raised $294,000, compared to $122,000 raised by the six Republicans in the race. The top Republican fundraisers were Anna Allred with $66,000 and Tricia Krenek with $55,000. Republican Gary Gates, who has run several unsuccessful races including a shot at the Texas Railroad Commission, spent $555,000 in the same period. This is more than the rest of the field combined. He was followed by Krenek spending $205,000, Markowitz spending $190,000, and Allred spending $104,000.

You can learn more about the HD 28 race in our earlier post on TeachTheVote.org. Read more about what’s on the constitutional election ballot here. Election Day is Tuesday, November 5. Sign up to get election reminders and help making your voting plan at TexasEducatorsVote.com.

Texas election roundup: Big shakeup at SBOE

Last week, outgoing State Board of Education (SBOE) chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) announced her plans to retire from the board. Following her announcement, a number of her Republican colleagues have also indicated plans to retire.

Donna Bahorich and Marty Rowley were photographed at a recent SBOE meeting. Both SBOE members have recently announced plans to retire from the board.

Member Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo) announced his plan to retire at the end of his current term, which expires in Jan. 2021. Rowley’s district is reliably Republican and covers much of West Texas. Past board chair Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands) and Member Ken Mercer (R-San Antonio) have also announced plans to retire. Mercer’s district has shifted from a majority Republican district to one that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. Democrat Beto O’Rourke carried Mercer’s district in 2018 with more than ten percent of the vote.

Candidates in this fall’s three special elections filed their 30-day-out campaign finance reports this week. As we expected, the House District (HD) 28 special election in Fort Bend County has drawn a significant amount of attention, where seven candidates are vying to fill the unexpired term of former Rep. John Zerwas. The lone Democrat in the race, educator Dr. Eliz Markowitz, reported raising $62,000, spending $16,000, and entering the final stretch with $38,000 cash on hand. Markowitz also received the endorsement of the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC this week. Republican neurosurgeon Dr. Anna Allred reported raising $159,000 during the reporting period, which is more than the other five Republicans in the HD 28 race combined. Allred has also retained Republican consultant Allen Blakemore, whose top client is Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick. Allred has spent $142,000 and heads into the final stretch with $86,000 on hand.

In addition to the HD 28 special election, the Nov. 5 election will give all Texas voters the chance to vote on 10 proposed constitutional amendments. The Texas League of Women Voters has put out a comprehensive guide to the proposals, which you can view here. You can also find additional election resources at the website for the Texas Educators Vote coalition. We’ll be posting additional resources to help you prepare for the constitutional election here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog next week, so be sure to check it out before you head to the polls. Early voting begins Oct. 21.

In Fort Bend County’s HD 28, a potential bellwether special election

On Nov. 5, 2019, voters statewide will weigh in on proposed constitutional amendments, but there are also a few special elections taking place that same day. A special election to fill the unexpired term of former state Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) will have plenty of eyeballs focused on House District (HD) 28 in Fort Bend County.

Six Republicans and one Democrat will face off to replace Rep. Zerwas, who resigned in order to work as a vice-chancellor for the University of Texas System. The Republicans in the race are Dr. Anna Allred, Gary Gates, Gary Hale, Tricia Krenek, Sarah Laningham, and Clinton Purnell. Dr. Eliz Markowitz is the lone Democrat in the race. Broken down by party, their background and positions relative to public education are outlined below.

Democrat:

  • Markowitz is a Katy educator who ran for the State Board of Education (SBOE) in 2018. Her website focuses on public education issues, including a detailed education policy platform. Markowitz supports reducing STAAR testing, improving school funding, and better teacher pay, while explicitly opposing private school vouchers. Markowitz has been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC.

Republican:

  • Allred is a Houston anesthesiologist who lists technical training among her education priorities on her campaign website.
  • Gates is a Rosenberg real estate investor who lost a runoff for the Texas Railroad Commission in 2016. Gates also ran unsuccessfully for the HD 28 seat back in 2002 and 2004. On his campaign website, he lists his positions as “protect tax payers,” “support our schools,” “defend 2nd amendment,” and “enhance school safety,” but does not offer additional information as to his views on those issues.
  • Hale is a former Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) intelligence officer from Katy. On his website, Hale expresses support for arming teachers with firearms and returning to corporal punishment as a potential solution to school shootings.
  • Krenek is a Katy attorney who lost a 2018 race for Fort Bend County commissioner. Her website includes some education policy positions, such as increasing the state’s share of education funding, changing school finance “to reduce Robin Hood recapture payments,” and funding “additional across-the-board teacher pay raises.”
  • Laningham lives in Richmond and is a small business owner. Her campaign website makes no mention of education issues. She also ran for state representative last year in House District 14, but had no campaign website that ATPE could locate at that time.
  • A campaign website could not be found for Purnell, but his LinkedIn profile lists his occupation as “global logistics manager and corporate trade compliance” in Houston.

The HD 28 race is one of three special elections scheduled this fall, along with HD 148 in Houston and HD 100 in Dallas. The latter are not competitive districts from the standpoint of potential partisan shifts, but the math in HD 28 makes it a swing district, where a candidate from either party has a legitimate chance at winning the seat. Zerwas, a popular long time incumbent, won his reelection in 2018 by only eight percentage points. In doing so, he outperformed U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, who won the district by just three points. Cruz’s margin represents a steady decline in Republican support in HD 28, which handed a ten percent margin to Donald Trump in 2016 and a 35-point margin to Greg Abbott in 2014.

Republicans hold a nine-seat majority in the Texas House. The winner of the HD 28 special election will serve out the rest of the term and will have to run for reelection again in 2020.

Voting is the single most important thing an educator can do to ensure the Texas Legislature prioritizes public schools and students. The deadline to register to vote in this special election and other November elections is Oct. 7, 2019. To see if you are registered and to check out a variety of election-related information, visit TexasEducatorsVote.com. As a reminder, early voting begins Oct. 21, and election day is Nov. 5.