Tag Archives: HD 28

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Jan. 31, 2020

As January ends, we hope you are registered to vote ahead of Super Tuesday on March 3! In the meantime, here’s this week’s education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


ELECTION UPDATE: Special elections in three Texas House districts concluded on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. The victors were Gary Gates (R) with 58.05% of the vote in House District (HD) 28, Lorraine Birabil (D) with 66.28% of the vote in HD 100, and Anna Eastman (D) with 65.47% of the vote in HD 148. Read more on the results in this election night blog post by ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell.

Early voting for the primary starts in just under three weeks on February 18, 2020, which is also Educator Voting Day. Primary election day follows two weeks later on March 3, 2020. Remember that the deadline to register to vote in the Texas primaries is Monday, Feb. 3. Verify your voter registration status here.

As the primaries get closer, here are helpful resources for educators and the general public:

  • Learn more about candidates running in 2020 for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education by checking out their profiles here on Teach the Vote, which include answers to the ATPE Candidate Survey (where available) and legislators’ voting records.
  • Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com for election resources, advice, and voting reminders.
  • The Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation is hosting “For the Future” education-oriented candidate forums around the state. Click here for details.

This week ATPE submitted public comments on three proposed changes to administrative rules that would affect public schools, educators, and students.

First, ATPE formally commented on proposed changes to commissioner’s rules that regulate school district-charter partnerships. Senate Bill 1882 of 2017 enabled school districts to partner with charter entities to operate some of their campuses, and newly proposed rules have raised some concerns for ATPE and other education stakeholders. Read our comments here.

Next, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is proposing changes to its certification rules that could benefit high school students interested in pursuing careers in the classroom. ATPE and the Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE) submitted joint recommendations this week for the criteria associated with the educational aide certificate. Those interested in submitting input on this rule proposal can find more information here. The deadline for public comments is Feb. 3, 2020.

Finally, ATPE also shared ouir concerns with SBEC about rules relating to master teacher certificates that are slated to be eliminated as a result of last year’s House Bill 3. Those wishing to submit public comments on this rule review can find more information here. The deadline is Feb. 3.

As you can see, our advocacy for public education doesn’t stop when the legislative session ends. During the interim, it is important to stay engaged with the work of state boards and agencies implementing education laws and legislative committees as they study interim charges. Learn more about interim advocacy in this new blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


Image sourced from THGC.

This week, Texans observed Holocaust Remembrance Week as designated by Gov. Greg Abbott after the 86th Legislature passed Senate Bill (SB) 1828 by Sen. José Menéndez in 2019. The Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission (THGC) recommended the observance this week so as to include International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27, which when Auschwitz was liberated. Also this week, in Washington, DC, the U.S. House passed H.R. 943, referred to as the “Never Again Education Act” to provide grants and resources for Holocaust education programs. Find more information and related links in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


The State Board of Education (SBOE) met today, Jan. 31, 2020, to conclude its week-long January meeting. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins attended the meeting and provided this update.

Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence), who chairs the Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund (PSF), updated members on the status of the fund. He reported that the PSF’s investments total $46.5 billion, and the fund is being utilized as collateral to guarantee $87 billion in bonds out of a $117 billion bond guarantee capacity. Of the bonds backed by the PSF, $85 billion of those are bonds for independent school districts, and $2 billion are bonds for charter schools.

The SBOE manages a portion of the PSF, while the School Land Board (SLB) under the General Land Office (GLO) manages the other portion. Legislation passed during the 2019 legislative session to address a dispute over PSF management expanded the SLB from three members to five, two of whom would be recommended by the SBOE. Those two members have now been seated on the SLB, and the SBOE is working on setting up a joint meeting in April.

The board spent much of the morning Friday discussing board training requirements for local school district trustees, and ultimately decided to maintain the current rules unchanged. Members also voted to give preliminary approval to curriculum standards for a new course on African-American studies, which would make Texas the fifth state in the nation to offer such a course, according to TEA officials.

Earlier in the week, ATPE’s Wiggins reported on one of the board committee’s discussion about the application process for charter schools and on Education Commissioner Mike Morath’s presentation to the full board on Tuesday with an annual update from the Texas Education Agency.


Today, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) released the 2019-20 accreditation statuses for Texas public school districts and open-enrollment charter schools. Accreditation statuses encapsulate a wide variety of factors, such as financial and academic accountability and compliance with reporting requirements. Districts and charters that are assigned anything other than an accredited status must notify parents and property owners in the district. Find your district’s status here.


 

Texas election roundup: Early voting in special runoffs

Early voting is underway this week in the special runoff elections in Dallas, Houston, and Fort Bend County. The special runoff in House District (HD) 28 in Fort Bend County has drawn national attention as Texas Democrats seek to capture a seat previously held by Republican state Rep. John Zerwas.

Republicans hold a nine-seat majority in the Texas House of Representatives, and Democrats are anxious to flip as many seats as possible in order to wrest control of the lower chamber heading into the 2021 legislative session. Democratic candidate Eliz Markowitz, who was endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC, was joined on the campaign trail this week by former presidential candidates Julian Castro and Beto O’Rourke. Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren also announced her support for Markowitz this week.

On the Republican side, the Quorum Report reported the Texas GOP is busing block walkers from all over Texas into Fort Bend to aid Republican candidate Gary Gates. The Gates campaign claimed their internal polling this week showed Gates up 13 percentage points over Markowitz. According to campaign reporter Jeff Blaylock, while Republican political consultant Derek Ryan’s analysis of the first two days of early voting show that only 46% of HD28 voters have recent Republican primary voting history but no Democratic primary history. Mail ballots in the HD 28 special runoff election have already surpassed the number submitted in the 2018 general election.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, 16.1 million Texans are now registered to vote. Voting is the single most important way to exercise your political voice, and early voting in primaries across the state begins in just a few weeks! The deadline to register to vote for the March 3 primary is February 3. Visit our friends at TexasEducatorsVote.com to find out how to register to vote and to access voter resources, including text reminders when an important vote is coming up.

Texas election roundup: New year edition

Welcome back from the holidays! While you’re hopefully easing into the spring semester, the Super Tuesday primaries — including the Texas primary — are less than two months away. That means election season is in full swing.

The new year began with Texas once again making news in the 2020 presidential primary. The last Texan in the race, former San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro suspended his campaign for the Democratic nomination last week and promptly endorsed U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) for the job. Castro is now actively campaigning for Warren.

Another high profile endorsement came to the House District 28 special runoff election, early voting for which begins January 21. Vice-president Joe Biden endorsed Democrat Eliz Markowitz, who has also been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC. Both Markowitz and her Republican opponent Gary Gates have released new video ads to begin the new year.

Speaking of Biden, a number of former Castro supporters have thrown their support behind the former veep now that Castro has left the race. State Reps. Rafael Anchia (D-Dallas), Ryan Guillen (D-Rio Grande City), Eddie Lucio III (D-Brownsville), Oscar Longoria (D-La Joya), and Mando Martinez (D-Weslaco) have all switched their support to Biden.

Elections are determined by who shows up! Now is a good time to visit our friends at the Texas Educators Vote coalition if you haven’t yet. Their website includes handy voting resources, including text reminders for important voting events and a link to the Educator’s Oath to Vote.

November 2019 election results: Runoffs ahead

The results from Tuesday’s elections are in, and all three special elections to fill unexpired terms in the Texas House of Representatives will head to runoffs. Voters also approved all but one of the 10 proposed constitutional amendments.

In Fort Bend County, lone Democrat Eliz Markowitz came in first for the special election in Texas House District (HD) 28 with 39 percent of the vote. Markowitz, who is endorsed by the pro-public education organization Texas Parent PAC, will head to a runoff against Republican Gary Gates, who carried 28 percent of the vote. You can read more about the race for HD 28 in this TeachTheVote.org post.

In Houston’s HD 148, Democrat Anna Eastman led a crowded field with 18 percent of the vote, according to numbers available early Wednesday morning. She will face Republican Luis La Rotta, who took 17 percent of the vote.

In HD 100 in Dallas, Democrat Lorraine Birabil will likely face fellow Democrat James Armstrong in a runoff. The two earned 33 percent and 21 percent of the vote, respectively.

You can read more reporting on the special election races in this Texas Tribune post.

Voters rejected statewide Proposition 1, which would have allowed selected municipal court judges to serve multiple municipalities at the same time, while passing the other nine constitutional propositions, including Propositions 4 and 7, which included some impact on public education. Seventy-three percent of voters approved Proposition 4, which added additional hurdles to passing a state income tax beyond existing constitutional prohibitions. Voters also approved Proposition 7, which will allow the State Board of Education (SBOE) and School Land Board (SLB) more flexibility in releasing distributions to the Available School Fund (ASF). You can read more about the information we provided on the proposed constitutional amendments in this TeachTheVote.org post. Per its member-created legislative program, ATPE took no position on any of the constitutional ballot propositions. Read more about the constitutional election results in this Texas Tribune post.

If you voted in the November 2019 elections, great job! Voting in these off-year elections is incredibly important as turnout is usually very low and important statewide decisions are made by a relatively small number of people. Sign up for reminders from our partners at the Texas Educators Vote coalition, and you’ll never worry about missing an important election. Then stay tuned for more election-related news here at Teach the Vote.

Texas election roundup: Last day to vote early

Early voting ends today in the statewide Texas constitutional election, as well as three special elections: one in Dallas and two in the Houston area.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, 542,000 out of nearly 16 million registered voters had voted by mail or in person by the time polls closed on Wednesday. This puts total statewide turnout around 3.4 percent. In Fort Bend County, the site of the House District (HD) 28 special election that could prove a bellwether race between Democrats and Republicans, turnout through Wednesday was 4.4 percent.

Candidates in the special elections were required to turn in their 8-day out campaign finance reports this week. Lone Democrat Eliz Markowitz, who has been endorsed by pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC, out-raised the rest of the field combined during the 30-day period between September 27 and October 26. Markowitz raised $294,000, compared to $122,000 raised by the six Republicans in the race. The top Republican fundraisers were Anna Allred with $66,000 and Tricia Krenek with $55,000. Republican Gary Gates, who has run several unsuccessful races including a shot at the Texas Railroad Commission, spent $555,000 in the same period. This is more than the rest of the field combined. He was followed by Krenek spending $205,000, Markowitz spending $190,000, and Allred spending $104,000.

You can learn more about the HD 28 race in our earlier post on TeachTheVote.org. Read more about what’s on the constitutional election ballot here. Election Day is Tuesday, November 5. Sign up to get election reminders and help making your voting plan at TexasEducatorsVote.com.

Texas election roundup: Big shakeup at SBOE

Last week, outgoing State Board of Education (SBOE) chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) announced her plans to retire from the board. Following her announcement, a number of her Republican colleagues have also indicated plans to retire.

Donna Bahorich and Marty Rowley were photographed at a recent SBOE meeting. Both SBOE members have recently announced plans to retire from the board.

Member Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo) announced his plan to retire at the end of his current term, which expires in Jan. 2021. Rowley’s district is reliably Republican and covers much of West Texas. Past board chair Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands) and Member Ken Mercer (R-San Antonio) have also announced plans to retire. Mercer’s district has shifted from a majority Republican district to one that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. Democrat Beto O’Rourke carried Mercer’s district in 2018 with more than ten percent of the vote.

Candidates in this fall’s three special elections filed their 30-day-out campaign finance reports this week. As we expected, the House District (HD) 28 special election in Fort Bend County has drawn a significant amount of attention, where seven candidates are vying to fill the unexpired term of former Rep. John Zerwas. The lone Democrat in the race, educator Dr. Eliz Markowitz, reported raising $62,000, spending $16,000, and entering the final stretch with $38,000 cash on hand. Markowitz also received the endorsement of the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC this week. Republican neurosurgeon Dr. Anna Allred reported raising $159,000 during the reporting period, which is more than the other five Republicans in the HD 28 race combined. Allred has also retained Republican consultant Allen Blakemore, whose top client is Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick. Allred has spent $142,000 and heads into the final stretch with $86,000 on hand.

In addition to the HD 28 special election, the Nov. 5 election will give all Texas voters the chance to vote on 10 proposed constitutional amendments. The Texas League of Women Voters has put out a comprehensive guide to the proposals, which you can view here. You can also find additional election resources at the website for the Texas Educators Vote coalition. We’ll be posting additional resources to help you prepare for the constitutional election here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog next week, so be sure to check it out before you head to the polls. Early voting begins Oct. 21.

In Fort Bend County’s HD 28, a potential bellwether special election

On Nov. 5, 2019, voters statewide will weigh in on proposed constitutional amendments, but there are also a few special elections taking place that same day. A special election to fill the unexpired term of former state Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) will have plenty of eyeballs focused on House District (HD) 28 in Fort Bend County.

Six Republicans and one Democrat will face off to replace Rep. Zerwas, who resigned in order to work as a vice-chancellor for the University of Texas System. The Republicans in the race are Dr. Anna Allred, Gary Gates, Gary Hale, Tricia Krenek, Sarah Laningham, and Clinton Purnell. Dr. Eliz Markowitz is the lone Democrat in the race. Broken down by party, their background and positions relative to public education are outlined below.

Democrat:

  • Markowitz is a Katy educator who ran for the State Board of Education (SBOE) in 2018. Her website focuses on public education issues, including a detailed education policy platform. Markowitz supports reducing STAAR testing, improving school funding, and better teacher pay, while explicitly opposing private school vouchers. Markowitz has been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC.

Republican:

  • Allred is a Houston anesthesiologist who lists technical training among her education priorities on her campaign website.
  • Gates is a Rosenberg real estate investor who lost a runoff for the Texas Railroad Commission in 2016. Gates also ran unsuccessfully for the HD 28 seat back in 2002 and 2004. On his campaign website, he lists his positions as “protect tax payers,” “support our schools,” “defend 2nd amendment,” and “enhance school safety,” but does not offer additional information as to his views on those issues.
  • Hale is a former Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) intelligence officer from Katy. On his website, Hale expresses support for arming teachers with firearms and returning to corporal punishment as a potential solution to school shootings.
  • Krenek is a Katy attorney who lost a 2018 race for Fort Bend County commissioner. Her website includes some education policy positions, such as increasing the state’s share of education funding, changing school finance “to reduce Robin Hood recapture payments,” and funding “additional across-the-board teacher pay raises.”
  • Laningham lives in Richmond and is a small business owner. Her campaign website makes no mention of education issues. She also ran for state representative last year in House District 14, but had no campaign website that ATPE could locate at that time.
  • A campaign website could not be found for Purnell, but his LinkedIn profile lists his occupation as “global logistics manager and corporate trade compliance” in Houston.

The HD 28 race is one of three special elections scheduled this fall, along with HD 148 in Houston and HD 100 in Dallas. The latter are not competitive districts from the standpoint of potential partisan shifts, but the math in HD 28 makes it a swing district, where a candidate from either party has a legitimate chance at winning the seat. Zerwas, a popular long time incumbent, won his reelection in 2018 by only eight percentage points. In doing so, he outperformed U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, who won the district by just three points. Cruz’s margin represents a steady decline in Republican support in HD 28, which handed a ten percent margin to Donald Trump in 2016 and a 35-point margin to Greg Abbott in 2014.

Republicans hold a nine-seat majority in the Texas House. The winner of the HD 28 special election will serve out the rest of the term and will have to run for reelection again in 2020.

Voting is the single most important thing an educator can do to ensure the Texas Legislature prioritizes public schools and students. The deadline to register to vote in this special election and other November elections is Oct. 7, 2019. To see if you are registered and to check out a variety of election-related information, visit TexasEducatorsVote.com. As a reminder, early voting begins Oct. 21, and election day is Nov. 5.