Tag Archives: HB 3

House Public Education Committee hears 21 bills, approves school finance plan in HB 3

House Committee on Public Education, March 19, 2019

On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, the House Committee on Public Education heard 21 bills on a variety of topics, including compensatory and accelerated education services, elections, and the state’s share of public education funding. Additionally, the committee voted out several bills, including Chairman Dan Huberty (R-Humble) and the Texas House’s plan for school finance, HB 3. Read our blog post on HB 3 here for more information on what’s in the bill.

The following bills were considered by the committee during yesterday’s hearing:

  • HB 462 (Geren et al.,R-Fort Worth): This bill enables House Joint Resolution (HJR) 24, which was also on the agenda for Tuesday, and states that the legislature must set base funding and guaranteed funding for each fiscal year at an amount necessary to comply with a minimum state share of education funding at 50% or a greater amount. This bill would cost $10 billion over the next two years. The minimum state share of 50% would be set by HJR 24 (see below).
  • HJR 24 (Geren, R-Fort Worth): Proposes a constitutional amendment requiring the state to pay at least 50% of the cost of maintaining and operating the public school system and prohibits the comptroller from certifying legislation containing an appropriation for public education unless the requirement is met. Constitutional amendments, if passed, are voted on by Texans and require a two-thirds majority for final passage.
  • HB 548 (Canales, D-Edinburg): Would require that districts and charter schools use Texas’s Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) to report truancy information on the number of: children who fail to enroll, children who fail to attend without excuse for 10+ days within a six-month period in same school year, students for whom a district initiates a truancy prevention measure, and parents of students that schools have filed a truancy complaint.
  • HB 735 (VanDeaver et al., R-New Boston): Rep. VanDeaver explained that HB 735 allows districts to lower and raise their tax rate to a maximum that was previously approved by voters in the past 10 years without a tax ratification election (TRE). He stated that this helps districts provide tax relief without worrying about the cost of an election in the future should the district need to raise its tax rate. HB 735 also requires a Comptroller study of the bill.
  • HB 1160 (Johnson, J., D-Houston): Would allow the compensatory education allotment to be used for guidance, counseling, and/or social work services provided by a licensed social worker or licensed professional counselor.
  • HB 1182 (Goodwin et al., D-Austin): Would change personal financial literacy from an elective to a required course. The committee substitute changes the bill so that the number of credits required for graduation would remain the same.
  • HB 1199 (Miller, R-Sugarland): Would change the way the Texas Education Agency (TEA) monitors school district compliance with dyslexia screening and testing to be more stringent. TEA would develop rules to audit, monitor, conduct site visits of all school districts, identify compliance problems, and develop remedial strategies to address noncompliance.
  • HB 1388 (VanDeaver, R-New Boston): Would require, in the student achievement domain of the accountability system for high school campuses and their districts, a measure of students (rather than a percentage of students) who successfully complete a practicum or internship approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) and students who successfully complete a coherent Career and Technical Education (CTE) sequence.
  • HB 1453 (Bernal, D-San Antonio): Would require that one of the four teachers on the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) has to be a teacher certified in special education with classroom experience. Requires SBEC to propose rules to establish a minimum requirement of field-based experience in which an educator certification candidate actively implements an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Updates staff development requirements to include training on IDEA and proactive and evidence-based inclusive instructional practices. Also allows for remote coaching for teachers in rural areas.
  • HB 1556 (VanDeaver, R-New Boston): Would make changes to law regarding the purchasing of goods and services to increase clarity for districts. Eliminates the phrase “in the aggregate” so that districts are not met with challenges in purchasing smaller chunks of goods.
  • HB 1597 (Lambert, R-Abilene): Would apply to a person whose parent or guardian is active-duty, allowing them to establish residency by providing a military order to the school district. Then, the family must provide proof of residency within ten days after their arrival date. The bill would also make charter schools subject to the same law.
  • HB 1632 (Bell, K. et al., R-Forney): For purposes of a school district’s provision of compensatory education, intensive, or accelerated services, the bill would add the following to the definition of “student at risk of dropping out of school:” student with dyslexia, educationally disadvantaged, has enrolled in 2+ public schools in the same school year for either the current or preceding school year, or has 10+ absences in a school year in the current or preceding school year.
  • HB 1639 (Martinez, D-Weslaco): States that, before December 21, 2024, boards of trustees can change the length of the terms of their trustees to either three- or four-year staggered terms.
  • HB 1664 (King, Ken, R-Canadian): Rep. King said that this bill cleans up some of the implementation issues with last session’s educator misconduct bill, SB 7. The bill states that a superintendent or director is not required to notify SBEC or file a report if they complete an investigation into educator misconduct before the educator’s termination and determine that the educator did not engage in the misconduct.
  • HB 1773 (Middleton, R-Wallisville): States that for districts that have their administration in a permanent building and students in a portable, the district has to put the administration in the portable and make classrooms in the former administration building.
  • HB 1823 (Cortez, D-San Antonio): Would change a the heading in law relating to the payment of school facilities allotments to more accurately reflect current practice.
  • HB 2116 (White et al., R-Hillister): For purposes of a district’s provision of compensatory education, intensive, or accelerated services, adds to the definition of “student at risk of dropping out of school:” student who has been incarcerated or has a parent who has been incarcerated.
  • HB 2210 (Bell, K. et al., R-Forney): Under this bill, students who receive residential services in a state hospital would not be considered in the accountability of the district or campus that the hospital is located in if their parent does not reside in the district.
  • HB 2424 (Ashby, R-Lufkin): Would require SBEC to propose rules to establish and issue micro-credentials for educators, which would be placed on their certificates. The agency would approve Continuing Professional Education (CPE) providers to offer micro-credential courses (which could include school districts).
  • HB 2778 (King, T., D-Uvalde): Would change the joint election agreement regarding election expenses so that it applies to a school district that has territory in at least four counties, each with a population of less than 55,000 (rather than 46,100).
  • HB 3134 (Middleton, R-Wallisville): Would allow a board of trustees to establish and operate a transportation system outside the county or district if students served by the county system or enrolled in the district reside outside the county or district.

The following bill was on the agenda but was not heard:

HB 1679 (Price, R-Amarillo): Would require the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) to provide limited student loan repayment assistance for eligible school counselors who apply and qualify.

The following bills were voted out favorably by the committee, which means they will now move on to the House Calendars Committee and face judgement on whether and when they may come before the entire House of Representatives for a vote: HB 3, HB 55, HB 391, HB 613, HB 663, HB 692, HB 808, HB 811, HB 960, HB 961, HB 1133, HB 1480, and HB 2074. Rep. VanDeaver’s HB 1051, which was heard last week and relates to the Goodwill Excel Center, was also voted out after VanDeaver and Rep. Alma Allen (D-Houston) came to an agreement that there would be a floor amendment to address her concerns about the bill.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: March 15, 2019

Here’s your wrap-up of education highlights from another busy week for the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testifying before the House Public Education Committee on March 12, 2019

Members of the House Public Education committee heard more than 12 hours of testimony this Tuesday on House Bill 3 (HB 3), the House’s comprehensive school finance reform bill. Stakeholders from parents to teachers and even children on spring break testified about the $9 billion bill. Many witnesses at Tuesday’s hearing expressed support for the bill, but a number of them shared reservations about its move to roll funding for gifted and talented programs into the basic allotment and a proposed merit pay plan that the commissioner of education would oversee under HB 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood).

ATPE testified neutrally on HB 3 stating that while the bill as filed has many positive qualities and would inject much-needed funding into the public education system, it also includes some troubling changes regarding the state’s minimum salary schedule and using teacher evaluations and student performance data for merit pay. Many witnesses, including ATPE, who expressed concerns about the merit pay plan noted that it would be difficult if not impossible for the commissioner to determine which teachers might receive merit pay under HB 3 without using data from student test scores, even though the bill itself does not specifically call for the use of the STAAR for this purpose. ATPE opposes the use of student performance data, including test scores, as the primary measure of a teacher’s effectiveness for purposes of compensation, which ATPE shared with the committee during our testimony that was delivered by Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter on Tuesday.

Currently, HB 3 is still pending in committee with a substitute version of the bill expected to be discussed next Tuesday, March 19. Read more about Tuesday’s school finance hearing in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

On Wednesday, the House Public Education Committee reconvened to hear a host of other bills related to topics such as Districts of Innovation (DOI) and school start dates. ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testified in support of HB 1051, a bill that would make permanent the Goodwill Excel center permanent, a charter school offering a successful dropout recovery program for adult students. ATPE also supported HB 340 relating to full-day pre-k and HB 1276 relating to educator certification. More details on bills heard during Wednesday’s hearing can be found here.

 


Earlier this week, the White House released the president’s 2020 budget proposal, which is little more than a statement of the president’s priorities given that Congress actually passes the federal budget. The proposal would cut billions from the Department of Education’s budget compared to what Congress previously enacted, while funding controversial programs such as school privatization and performance-based compensation. Read a more detailed analysis of the President’s budget proposal on our Teach the Vote blog here.

 


The Senate State Affairs Committee met Thursday morning to hear a number of bills. Among them was Senate Bill 12 by Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston). SB 12 would increase the TRS contribution rate and get the fund back to a point of actuarial soundness by the end of the biennium. In addition to the increased contribution rate, the bill would also fund a small 13th check of $500 for current TRS retirees. ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testified in support of the bill. For more background on why TRS contribution increases are now needed, check out this previous blog post about actions taken by the TRS board of trustees in the summer of 2018.


Residents of the San Antonio area’s House District 125 elected Democrat Ray Lopez to represent them in the House in a special election held this Tuesday. Lopez, a former city council member will be serving in the seat vacated by current Bexar County Commissioner and former HD 125 state representative Justin Rodriguez. ATPE congratulates Representative-Elect Lopez and looks forward to working with him. This election was the last in a series of special elections meant to fill seats that were vacated after last fall’s elections. As we reported last week, Houston area residents of House District 145 last week elected Democrat Christina Morales to fill the seat vacated by former representative and now Senator Carol Alvarado.

 


ThinkstockPhotos-465016790_moneyLast Friday evening the Senate released its version of a school finance reform proposal, Senate Bill 4 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood). While the Senate has worked diligently to pass an across-the-board teacher pay raise bill this session (SB 3), its version of a more comprehensive school finance reform plan is a little less robust than its counterpart in the House. SB 4 includes provisions for outcomes-based funding and merit pay for classroom teachers. Read more information about the Senate bill in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

 


House Public Education Committee hears bills and testimony on assessment

On Tuesday, March 6, 2019, the House Public Education Committee heard six bills related to testing and the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR).

The committee began by hearing seven panels of invited testimony from superintendents and other district leaders, teachers, Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff, and parents. Their comments generally centered around the reliability of STAAR testing in light of recent articles reporting that reading tests are written at a grade level above that of the students being tested (Texas Monthly, The New York Times, Washington Post, Houston Chronicle). Many issues arose during the rich discussion, including the misalignment between the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) curriculum standards and how the TEKS are tested; the misalignment of expectations between TEA and school districts; the negative impact of testing on students; and the flawed public narrative that inaccurate tests create.

The first panel was composed of superintendents from Alief ISD, Northside ISD, San Marcos ISD, and Granger ISD. The general sentiment among the panelists was that the state should have assessments with appropriately rigorous standards, but make sure they are valid, fair, meaningful, and timely. Additionally, witnesses testified that the tests should undergo rigorous review and field-testing. The danger lies in misalignment between the expectations of test and the expectations of standards, as well as misalignment with other assessments and what teachers know about tests. This results in the STAAR tests creating an inaccurate narrative and in students giving up on their passions.

The second panel included Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath, who stated that the STAAR tests were meant to predict post-secondary outcomes. Morath emphasized that National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) outcomes have remained flat or declined over the past decade, and he defended the reliability of the STAAR tests. He did admit that the Texas student population has increased significantly over time and grown progressively poorer. Appearing with Morath were three reading experts, one of whom was from the organization that developed lexile scores, Meta-Metrics. Dr. Sanford-Moore of Meta-Metrics explained that lexiles are based on a computer algorithm and measure language structure based on the number of ideas in a sentence and the vocabulary used.

Reps. Gary VanDeaver (R-New Boston), Morgan Meyer (R-Highland Park), and Mary Gonzalez (D- Clint) all made compelling points about the tests. VanDeaver stated, “These are children and not machines. What happens when we reach that level that goes beyond challenging and becomes frustrating and the child shuts down?” Similarly, Meyer shared a story of his fourth-grade daughter, who cried on the way to school the day of the STAAR test and came home defeated. Meyer said, “You call it challenge, I call it frustration.” Gonzalez reiterated her previous comment that it is imperative for the public purpose of the tests to be clear.

This led to a flurry of discussion, bouncing from issue to issue within the educational system, including the A-F accountability grading system; expectations for teachers and district leadership to understand the STAAR test; the use of tests for grade promotion and teacher evaluations; teacher and student stress; curriculum; professional development; and educator preparation. Overall, the range of topics that arose seemed to point to a disconnect between the agency’s expectation of teachers, districts, and students, and the practices and understandings of school districts.

At the four-hour mark of the hearing, the testimony of the third through seventh panels proceeded much more quickly. Another panel of superintendents from Comal ISD, Wylie ISD, and Frisco ISD testified that they used multiple interim assessments and instructional quality improvements to perform well on the STAAR. Additionally, Dr. Mike Waldrip of Frisco ISD said that the timing of the STAAR test at the end of the year wasn’t particularly useful for making preparations for the next year. A fourth panel composed of district leaders in literacy and learning expressed a key takeaway: that there is a disconnect between the reading level of instruction using the TEKS versus the reading level of assessment. The fifth panel, composed of teachers and an interventionist, was deemed the best panel of the day by Rep. Dr. Alma Allen (D-Houston), a long-time member of the committee who is also an educator. Notably affecting the committee members, one of the panelists announced that the time elapsed in the hearing was about the same amount of time students sit for a STAAR test. This panel also spoke to the needs of students and teachers in having the appropriate tools to provide relevant and effective instruction so that students can succeed on state tests. The sixth and seventh panels, which included other district leaders, parents, and stakeholders echoed much of the sentiments in of the previous panels, such as the negative impact of testing on students.

After nearly six hours of testimony from the invited panelists, who provided invaluable insights on the reliability, validity, and usefulness of testing to the state’s educational system, the committee turned its attention to hearing the bills posted on the agenda.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies in the House Public Education Committee, March 5, 2019.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified neutrally on House Bill (HB) 671 by Rep. Ken King (R-Canadian). HB 671 would eliminate end-of-course (EOC) examinations and replace them with a school district’s choice of  either the TSI or a nationally recognized, norm-referenced assessment such as ACT or SAT, to be administered in grade 11. Under the bill, the commissioner would contract with a vendor to administer the assessment. HB 671 also mandates that each district require students to attend a preparation course to succeed on the test and defines college readiness. Chevalier expressed that while ATPE supports the reduction in mandated state tests, we want to ensure that any test used to replace the STAAR is both appropriate as an input into the state accountability system and provides the appropriate accommodations for students receiving special education services, students under a 504 plan, and English language learners.

ATPE registered positions in support of the following bills:

  • HB 525 (Tinderholt, R-Arlington): Would limit the required assessments to just mathematics, reading, and science (eliminating writing, social studies, English II, and US History tests)
  • HB 851 (Huberty, R- Kingwood): Would eliminate the September 1, 2019 expiration date of the law authorizing Individual Graduation Committees (IGCs)
  • HB 1480 (VanDeaver, R- New Boston): Would create an accelerated learning committee (ALC) for students who do not perform satisfactorily on third, fifth, or eighth grade reading or math assessments. Also would allow accelerated instruction to be provided to the student in the following year. The ALC would develop an educational plan for the student, provide assistance to student, and perform additional duties if the student doesn’t meet the standard for a second time after accelerated instruction. HB 1480 would also eliminate the requirement that assessments are used for promotion. The bill would eliminate social studies and US History assessments and require the commissioner to gather input from districts on an assessment schedule that minimizes disruption and maximizes instruction time.

Other bills heard in committee were:

  • HB 843 (Springer, R-Gainesville): Would allow for the inclusion of optional post-secondary readiness assessments in Algebra II and English III in the accountability system under the student achievement domain
  • HB 1244  (Ashby, R- Lufkin): Would eliminate the US History EOC and create an electronic civics test as a requirement for graduation, which would contain all questions on the U.S. Citizenship test in a multiple-choice format.

The House Public Education Committee plans to meet again next week. On Tuesday, March 12, the committee will to hear Chairman Huberty’s comprehensive school finance reform bill, HB 3, filed earlier this week. Chairman Huberty also said he expects HB 3 to reach the House floor by the first week of April. Over half the members of the Texas House have already signed on as co-authors for HB 3. The committee also expects to meet next Wednesday to hear other bills. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote and follow us on Twitter for updates.