Tag Archives: election

Texas election roundup: Less than two weeks remaining!

There are less than two weeks, and only one weekend, remaining to vote in the 2020 elections, and the clock is ticking! Early voting continues through Friday, October 30, with Election Day on November 3.


The presidential candidates wrapped up their second and final debate of the campaign season last night in Nashville, Tennessee. The final debate had been rescheduled by the Commission on Presidential Debates after an earlier townhall-style event was canceled when the president contracted COVID-19. Now the campaigns will go their separate ways for the remainder of the election. A new Quinnipiac University poll this week showed Donald Trump and Joe Biden tied at 47% each among likely Texas voters. A rolling average of recent polls tracked by RealClearPolitics shows Trump with a 4% advantage in Texas.


The Texas Tribune reports that 5.9 million Texans have voted early as of October 21, or about 34.7% of registered voters. Of those, 4.3% submitted their ballots by mail. According to early voting statistics compiled by Republican consultant Derek Ryan, 32.1% of early voters last voted in a Republican primary, compared to 29.0% who last voted in a Democratic primary. Another 26.3% have voted in a general election but have no primary election voting history, and 12.7% of the early voters have no history of voting in any election before now.

The Texas Supreme Court continued to release election-related decisions this week. The state’s highest court ruled in favor of Harris County on Thursday and tossed out a challenge by the Republican Party of Texas to block drive-through voting in the state’s largest county. This means voters in Harris County can continue to visit one of 10 drive-through voting locations set up by the county to allow voters fearing COVID-19 to cast ballots from the safety of their automobiles.


In the race for U.S. Senate here in Texas, Democratic candidate MJ Hegar reported raising three times as much as incumbent Republican Sen. John Cornyn in the first half of October, $3.7 million to $1.3 million. Hegar also ended with more money in the bank, $6.9 million to $3.8 million. Both candidates spent around the same amount, with Cornyn spending $5.6 million and Hegar spending $5.3 million. This week’s Quinnipiac poll shows Cornyn with a 6% advantage over Hegar, 49% to 43%.


Speaking of polls, Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey points out in this handy video how polls have their strengths and weaknesses. Many polls in 2016 inaccurately predicted Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton would win the presidential election. Polls are based on estimates of what the electorate will look like, and predicting that is part art and part science. Polls are generally quite accurate, but unexpected changes in the electorate can throw off a poll’s results. Pollsters have therefore spent the years since 2016 trying to develop better models of the electorate, especially at the state level. A poll is also a snapshot of a single moment in time, which is why you see margins shift over the course of an election cycle. The best way to consume polling information is to look at an average of recent polls.

The first two weeks of early voting have already set records, and there is still a full week of early voting left! If you haven’t voted yet, go to the candidates section here at Teach the Vote and research the races based on your address. Then make your plan to go vote with the aid of this handy guide. Your vote is the single most impactful tool you have to ensure our schools are safe, healthy, and well-funded. Now get out there and exercise it!

Happy Educator Voting Day!

It’s been a wild election season—and a wild year in general. Today, October 19, marks Educator Voting Day in Texas. Whether you will vote today, on another day during early voting, or on Election Day, make sure you have a plan to vote!

Voting is the single most important way to ensure Texas will have pro-public education officeholders working in the best interest of you and your students. We at ATPE like to recognize Educator Voting Day along with our partners at Texas Educators Vote.

To mark the importance of today, we’re reupping important election information and our voter resources list. It’s never been more vital to make a voting plan and stick to it!

  • Early voting for the general election continues through Friday, October 30; dates and hours may vary based on your location.
  • Find important dates, your voter registration status, polling locations, and more on the Texas Secretary of State’s My Voter Page, or contact your county clerk.
  • For more information about the election, including sample ballots and what you need to bring with you to the polls, visit votetexas.gov.
  • Learn more about each candidate on ATPE’s Teach the Vote, which includes candidates’ answers to the ATPE Candidate Survey (when available) and legislators’ voting records.
  • Need help finding information about the candidates on Teach the Vote? Watch our instructional video narrated by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.
  • Find out what health protocols are in place to protect voters at polling locations here.
  • Do you have questions about voting by mail? Check out the “So, You’re Thinking about Voting by Mail” article on Teach the Vote.
  • Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com for election resources, advice, and voting reminders.
  • Use vote411.org to build a personalized ballot that you can print out and take with you to the polls. (You’re not permitted to use your cell phone while voting.)
  • Read one ATPE lobbyist’s experience with early voting in the general election.

Be safe, and go vote!

This content was originally posted on the ATPE blog here.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Oct. 2, 2020

Here is this week’s recap of the latest education news from your ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATEATPE released a response to a press statement sent out by The Texas Education Agency (TEA) this week stating that the agency would extend the “hold harmless” funding period for school districts by six weeks to help mitigate the effects of enrollment drops across public schools in Texas. However, in a move that seems contradictory to the TEA’s acknowledgement last week of COVID-19 hotspots, the agency has tied a district’s access to the additional “protected” funding to whether a district offers in-person instruction. Read more about the development in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier, or in this article, quoting ATPE, by Aliyya Swaby of the Texas Tribune.

ATPE is here for educators. Be sure to check out our COVID-19 FAQs and Resources page and other resources:


ELECTION UPDATE: Are you registered to vote in the county you live in? Has your name recently changed? Have you been purged from the voter rolls? The deadline to register to vote is October 5, this coming Monday! Be sure to check your registration and learn how to register. Early voting begins October 13 and lasts for three weeks through October 30. Find more voting dates and reminders here.

The Texas Senate District 30 special election ended this week in a runoff. The date of the face-off between salon owner Shelley Luther and current state Representative Drew Springer (R-Muenster) has not yet been set by Gov. Greg Abbott. For more on this week’s election news, including the recent straight-ticket voting court battle and Gov. Abbott’s proclamation Thursday limiting mail-in ballot drop-off locations, read this informative blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

October is Voter Education Month, so let’s get learned! To learn about who makes education decisions (and which of these positions you can vote for), check out this post by our partners at the Texas Educators Vote coalition. Also, click here to learn about candidate forums being sponsored by Raise Your Hand Texas starting next week.


Sec. DeVos at a Feb. 2020 House Approp. subcommittee hearing

FEDERAL UPDATE: Remember when U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos asked public schools to spend an unheard-of amount of their Title-I-based federal emergency dollars on all students in all private non-profit schools within their boundaries? With DeVos’s decision last Friday to not appeal a recent court case that vacated her inequitable interpretation of the CARES Act, it seems the “equitable services” saga has come to an end. Read more about the saga, from start to finish, in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

 


After data discrepancies, this week the state adjusted numbers on the Texas Education Agency (TEA) and Department of State Health Services (DSHS) dashboard that tracks COVID-19 cases in public schools. Updated every Wednesday, this week’s numbers show 1,490 new student cases and 819 new staff cases reported for the week ending in September 27. Compared to the previous week’s numbers for students and staff, both have changed slightly (2% decrease for students, 2.5% increase for staff). Read about the adjusted numbers in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


This week, ATPE responded to formal requests for information from both the House Public Education committee and the House Appropriations Article III subcommittee, which focuses on public K-12 and higher education. ATPE’s submissions covered educators’ concerns with COVID-19, STAAR testing and accountability, educator and student mental health and well-being, and ways the state can prioritize funding to maintain the public education gains made by the 86th Texas Legislature. Read more about ATPE’s submissions and our contribution to these committee’s interim work in this blog post by ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell.


Are you retired or considering retiring? Be sure to check out these upcoming events to be in the know.

  1. The Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS) has opened registration for its 2020 TRS-Care virtual information sessions. These webinars are intended to help retired public education employees, or those considering retirement, learn more about the TRS-Care Standard and TRS-Care Medicare Advantage plans for 2021. They will also introduce the new providers that will administer TRS health plans starting Jan. 1, 2021. You can register for these webinars at trs.texas.gov/trs-care-events.
  2. This week, the Texas Retired Teachers Association (TRTA) hosted a virtual townhall on teacher retirement issues with incumbent U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX). The second TRTA townhall will feature Cornyn’s challenger, retired U.S. Air Force combat veteran M.J. Hegar on October 3 at 2:15 pm. Find more details on Cornyn’s townhall and register for Hegar’s townhall here.
  3. ATPE is partnering with RBFCU and the RBFCU retirement program on a webinar on October 7 at 5 pm about retirement planning for educators. Find the sign up information here.

Texas election roundup: Registration deadline Monday!


An important deadline is approaching ahead of the critical Nov. 3 election! Monday, October 5 is the last to register to vote if you are not already registered in the county in which you plan to cast your ballot.

Everyone, whether you think you are registered or not, should check their registration status NOW via the Texas Secretary of State (SOS) website. In order to check your status, simply click the link above and locate the section on the right hand side of the page that says “Login.” Choose one of the three choices for identity verification: Voter unique identifier (VUID) and date of birth (DOB); Texas drivers license (TDL) and date of birth; or name, county, and date of birth.

You can find your VUID on your voter registration card that you received from your county voter registrar, but the easiest option for many people may just be to use their drivers license and date of birth. Once you’ve entered your information and clicked “Submit,” you will be taken to a second screen that displays your voter status. Look on the left hand side of the screen under the section labeled “Voter Information.” Find where it says “Voter Status” to confirm your status.

If your voter status shows you are not registered or if you receive a pop-up notification that reads “Voter not found using the information provided,” then you will need to contact your county voter registrar in order to confirm your registration or just fill out new registration paperwork. You can find the voter registrar for your county by clicking here.

The SOS website allows you to request a voter registration application by mail, which you can then turn into your county voter registrar, but that application is not likely to reach you in time for the Monday deadline. For that reason, you should use the SOS online registration feature. The site allows you to fill out a registration form online. Once the application is filled out:

  • Print the application
  • Sign it;
  • Insert in an envelope addressed to the county (the address is at the top of the form);
  • Place a first class stamp on the envelope; and
  • Drop it in the Mail – by October 5!

If you don’t have access to a printer, you can also register directly through your county voter registrar. In most cases, the process is as simple as going down to the county offices and filling out a simple form. Whichever method you use, be sure that your ballot is delivered or postmarked by Monday, October 5!

That’s the long and short of it. Make sure you are registered to vote in the county in which you plan to vote, and make sure every eligible voter you know is registered as well. That means if you are a college student, whether you decide to vote in your home county or in the county where you go to school is up to you — but the key is that you must be registered in the county in which you plan to vote. Registration is critical. Every vote will count in this election.


In other election news, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that there will be no straight-ticket voting in Texas for the Nov. 3 election. The Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a state law passed in 2017 that ended the practice of straight-ticket voting in Texas and overturned a ruling last week by a lower court judge who attempted to reinstate straight-ticket voting ahead of the election.


As we previously reported, state Rep. Drew Springer (R-Muenster) and metroplex salon owner Shelley Luther will head to a special runoff election to represent North Texas in the Texas Senate after Tuesday’s special election in Senate District (SD) 30. In the final tally, Luther led Springer by a microscopic margin of 32.17% to 31.93%, with just 164 votes separating the two. Gov. Greg Abbott will determine when to hold the runoff.


Gov. Abbott issued an order Thursday limiting counties to a single drop-off location for mail-in ballots. With a nationwide uptick in mail-in voting expected as a result of concerns over COVID-19 exposure, several cities have offered multiple locations for voters to hand deliver their mail-in ballot in order to reduce pressure on the postal service to deliver millions of mail-in ballots to county election officials on time. Harris County, which spans more than 1,700 square miles and is home to 2.4 million registered voters, offered a dozen locations for voters to drop off mail-in ballots. Travis County, which is home to more than 700,000 voters spread across 1,000 square miles, offered four locations. Gov. Abbott’s order limits each county to a single location regardless of size, citing an effort to “strengthen ballot security protocols.”

The governor did not describe how decreasing the number of drop-off locations would strengthen security protocols, and Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir called the move “a deliberate attempt to manipulate the election.” Despite the spread of misinformation regarding the security of mail-in voting, every study conducted thus far has affirmed that widespread voter fraud does not exist.


More than 73 million people tuned in to watch Tuesday night’s debate between President Donald Trump and former Vice-President Joe Biden. It was the first of three debates the campaigns have agreed to, in addition to one debate between vice-presidential candidates Mike Pence and Kamala Harris. The rest of the schedule is as follows:

  • Wednesday, October 7: Vice-presidential Debate
  • Thursday, October 15: Presidential Debate
  • Thursday, October 22: Presidential Debate

That means the last two presidential debates will happen while Texans are casting their ballots. Early voting in Texas begins Oct. 13 and runs through Oct. 30. Gov. Abbott extended the normal two-week early voting period to three weeks in order to facilitate better social distancing at polling locations. But it won’t do you any good if you’re not registered to vote. Check your registration today!

Equitable services saga ends following court decision against DeVos rule

As we reported here on Teach the Vote a couple weeks ago, a federal court nullified a controversial federal rule that would have funneled additional public dollars to private schools under an “equitable services” provision of the CARES Act. With a statement that U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos will not appeal that decision, it seems as though the equitable services saga has finally come to an end. Here’s the story from start to finish:

On March 27, 2020, the CARES Act was signed into law. It provided Texas public schools with federal aid meant to combat extra costs associated with COVID-19. The CARES Act requires public school districts to use a portion of their emergency funds to provide equitable services to certain private schools, following long-standing federal education law practices.

Leave it to DeVos to disregard Congressional intent and interpret the equitable services provision in the CARES Act to send an unprecedented amount of public school emergency funds to private schools. Deviating from the prior practice, DeVos issued April 30 guidance directing school districts to calculate their equitable services allocation using ALL students at ALL private non-profit schools in their bounds. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) held districts to this questionable guidance while other states chose to ignore it.

Two main points make this interpretation egregious: Number one, equitable services allocations are typically calculated based on eligible students (low-income, English learners, etc.) who live in the district’s bounds but who attend a private school. Number two, CARES Act funds were 90% based on Title I formula-funding. Under DeVos’s interpretation, a student who lives in a wealthy neighborhood but attends a private school in another part of town would now get the benefit of federal emergency dollars that were calculated based on low-income children. The “poor must share with the rich” is not equitable.

After much consternation from the education community, the department issued an interim final rule (IFR) on July 1 that gave three options to school districts. On the one hand, the rule gave districts an option to follow the long-standing interpretation of equitable services, which was good. However, the rule meant that the DeVos interpretation now held the effect of law, which was bad. ATPE submitted formal comments opposing the new rule in July, but the department did not change any of its practices. Meanwhile, TEA conducted new trainings to inform districts of the changes.

A slew of court cases and a final summary judgement leads us to the beginning of September. The September 4 ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Dabney L. Friedrich vacated the IFR nationwide. TEA updated its equitable services guidance the following week but cautioned districts that DeVos had 60 days to appeal the decision.

On September 25, DeVos issued a letter to all chief state school officers stating that the department would not appeal the decision. TEA held a new training this week instructing districts to revert to the original interpretation of equitable services, as intended by Congress.

Betsy DeVos

While DeVos argues, “all schools and all students have borne the pandemic’s burden and need support,” Congress has provided small business assistance that private schools and even some public charter schools have taken advantage of already. Should Congress wish to specifically fund private schools, they could consider a separate piece of legislation that is not tied to Title I formula-funding.

The back-and-forth over the equitable services issue this year reminds us of the power struggles that can arise at the state and federal level between elected lawmakers, agency heads appointed by a governor or the president, and the courts that provide much-needed checks and balances in our democracy. The Secretary of Education is appointed by the President of the United States and is confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Not only are there many state and federal legislative races being decided this year, but the presidential election in 2020 will shape the next four years of education policymaking at the federal level.

ATPE encourages you to make sure you are registered to vote by October 5 and research your ENTIRE ballot using resources such as the candidate profiles on Teach the Vote (for Texas House, Texas Senate, and State Board of Education races on the ballot this year) and vote411.org, where you can build and print out a sample ballot of your own. Early voting for the general election begins October 13.

Senate District 30 special election results

Today, September 29, voters in Senate District (SD) 30 in North Texas headed to the polls for a special election. The Senate seat opened up after Sen. Pat Fallon (R-Prosper) last month announced his plans to resign. Fallon was tapped by the Republican party to replace former U.S. Rep. John Ratcliffe on the ballot in the November general election for the 4th Congressional District of Texas, after Ratcliffe became the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) for the Trump administration. Gov. Greg Abbott quickly called for the special election even before Fallon’s resignation was effected in the solidly Republican Senate district.

Here are the unofficial results of today’s special election:

  • Current state Rep. Drew Springer (R-Muenster) received 31.83% of the votes. Springer was endorsed by the outgoing Fallon along with several other members of the Texas Legislature.
  • Beauty salon owner turned Republican activist Shelley Luther earned 31.7% of the votes. Luther gained national fame after she was arrested for violating business closure orders amid the COVID-19 pandemic, which Gov. Abbott scaled back immediately thereafter.
  • Republican boot company owner Craig Carter brought in 5.53% of the votes.
  • Republican Chris Watts who resigned as Mayor of Denton in order to vie for this seat received 6.28% of the votes.
  • Republican consultant Andy Hopper received 3.59% of the votes.
  • The lone Democratic candidate in the race, electrician Jacob Minter, earned 21.06% of the vote in this heavily Republican-leaning district.

The top two finishers, Springer and Luther, were separated by less than one hundred votes, out of more than 68,000 cast. Since no candidate earned more than 50% of the votes needed to win today, the top two finishers will move on to a runoff. A date for the runoff election has not yet been announced.

From The Texas Tribune: Federal judge blocks Texas’ elimination of straight-ticket voting

By Alex Samuels, The Texas Tribune
Sept. 25, 2020

The Texas Legislature eliminated straight-ticket voting in 2017. Photo Credit: Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

Less than three weeks before early voting begins in Texas, a U.S. district judge has blocked the state from eliminating straight-ticket voting as an option for people who go to the polls this November.

In a ruling issued late Friday, U.S. District Judge Marina Garcia Marmolejo cited the coronavirus pandemic, saying the elimination of the voting practice would “cause irreparable injury” to voters “by creating mass lines at the polls and increasing the amount of time voters are exposed to COVID-19.”

Marmolejo also found that the GOP-backed law would “impose a discriminatory burden” on black and Hispanic voters and “create comparatively less opportunities for these voters to participate in the political process.”

She acknowledged the burden the decision could put on local and state election officials, who will have to recalibrate voting machines or reprint ballots. But she reasoned that the potential harm for those suing, including the Texas Association for Retired Americans, was “outweighed by the inconveniences resulting.”

The popular practice of straight-ticket voting allowed general-election voters to vote for all of the candidates of either party in an election by simply picking a straight-ticket option at the top of the ballot. But Texas Republican lawmakers championed a change to the law during the 2017 legislative session, arguing it would compel voters to make more-informed decisions because they would have to make a decision on every race on a ballot.

Most states don’t allow for one-punch voting, but its elimination in Texas met intense opposition from Democrats, who fear the change will be most felt among voters of color and lead to voter drop-off, particularly in blue urban counties that have the longest ballots in the state. In Harris County, for example, ballots can go on for pages because of the number of state district judges and other local officials up for election. Democrats worried that having to vote on each individual race would slow people down, causing longer lines at the polls.

Over the past four presidential elections, one-punch voting has generally proved more popular among Democrats in Texas’ 10 largest counties. About two-thirds of people who voted in Texas in the 2018 general election used the straight-ticket option.

Although the change was signed into law almost three years ago, a last-minute amendment to the legislation delayed its implementation until this year’s general election. The delay proved ill conceived for the majority party in 2018, when down-ballot Republicans faced a rout in urban counties where Democrats were aided by straight-ticket voting.

The Texas Democratic Party joined other Democratic groups and candidates in suing the state in March to overturn the law, but Marmolejo dismissed the case. Another suit was then filed, but with the Texas Association for Retired Americans added as plaintiffs and the state party removed. Nonetheless, Democrats celebrated the judge’s order Friday.

“Time and time again Republican leadership has tried to make it harder to vote and time and time again federal courts strike it down,” Texas Democratic Party Chair Gilberto Hinojosa said in a statement after the ruling. “Texas Democrats will have to continue to win at the ballot box to protect the right vote. Until the new Texas majority wipes out these out-of-touch Republicans, Texas Democrats will never stop fighting for Texans in court.”

Despite the partisan split on the 2017 law, there was considerable uncertainty about how the elimination of straight-ticket voting would impact the 2020 elections in Texas. Some Republicans have privately expressed concern that Donald Trump supporters would vote for president and then leave the polls, hurting the GOP down the ballot. Democrats, meanwhile, worried that long lines in urban areas would deter their voters.

Multiple voting cases have ended up in court in Texas in the months since the coronavirus pandemic began. Democrats sued to expand eligibility for mail-in voting, but those attempts have failed so far. Meanwhile, in July, Gov. Greg Abbott added six days to the early voting period, moving the start date up to Oct. 13 from Oct. 19, citing the contagion. He is facing a lawsuit over the extension from members of his own party.


Federal judge blocks Texas’ elimination of straight-ticket voting” was first published by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 25, 2020

Here is this week’s recap of the latest education news from your ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: Schools around Texas continue to tackle difficult decisions on reopening and whether to offer virtual or in-person instruction. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) slightly modified its COVID-19 guidance this week on attendance and enrollment, aiming to address some recent questions about school reopenings and remote learning options. Many school boards are deciding whether to request waivers from the state that would enable their districts to operate in a remote environment longer than the initial four-week transition approved by TEA for all districts.

The new TEA guidance indicates that the agency will consider granting additional flexibility based on metrics announced recently in Gov. Greg Abbott’s plan for business reopening. Specifically, TEA will “take into consideration” whether a school district lies within one of the hospital regions where COVID-19 patients make up more than 15% of all hospitalizations. While we appreciate state officials’ recognizing the importance of considering objective health-related data on COVID-19, as ATPE has recommended, new guidance remains vague and leaves the ultimate discretion to unelected state leaders. Read more about the updated guidance and how school districts are approaching the return to campus in this post by ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell.

Last week, ATPE launched an anonymous member-only survey through our Advocacy Central section of the ATPE website that asks two questions about how educators feel their health and safety is being ensured. Join hundreds of other survey responders and share your responses by Sunday, September 27. Here are additional coronavirus resources from ATPE:


FEDERAL UPDATE: U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos reiterated her support for school choice and in-person schooling this week during a U.S. Department of Education webinar on school reopening. The panel presentation featured private, public, and charter school administrators who shared best practices on how they have reopened their schools this fall. Some of the strategies may be unattainable for the majority of public schools who need increased funding for pandemic-related increased costs. Read more about the presentation in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


A few upcoming events are scheduled that are geared toward educators who are retired or considering retiring in the near future. First, the Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS) has opened registration for its 2020 TRS-Care virtual information sessions. These webinars are intended to help retired public education employees, or those considering retirement, learn more about the TRS-Care Standard and TRS-Care Medicare Advantage plans for 2021. They will also introduce the new providers that will administer TRS health plans starting Jan. 1, 2021. You can register for these webinars at trs.texas.gov/trs-care-events.

Next week the Texas Retired Teachers Association (TRTA) plans to host two virtual townhalls on teacher retirement issues. The first townhall will feature incumbent U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) on September 29 at 4 pm. The second townhall will feature Cornyn’s challenger, retired U.S. Air Force combat veteran M.J. Hegar on October 3 at 2:15 pm. Find more details on the two events here.


The Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and the Texas Education Agency (TEA) are sharing with the public data on the prevalence of the coronavirus in Texas public schools. The online dashboard shows Texas public schools have reported 6,295 COVID-19 cases on their campuses. According to the data, 3,445 students have tested positive for COVID-19 out of 1,101,065 on campus. The agency reported 1,212 new positive cases during the week ending September 20, up from 1,046 new cases the previous week. The agency reported 2,850 school staff members tested positive. Of those, 660 were new cases during the week ending September 20, down from 859 new cases reported the previous week. The agency has not maintained a count of how many staff are present on campus at the moment.

It’s difficult to draw conclusions from this data. Relatively few students are on campus at the moment, and social distancing measures will become more difficult to maintain as more students return to classrooms. ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes weighed in on the numbers in this article by the Houston Chronicle.

Jimmy Lee

RELATED: As schools deal with COVID-19 occurrences on campus and their employees’ fears of catching the virus, some districts are worried about finding enough substitute teachers. ATPE State President Jimmy Lee was interviewed this week in a story on CBS Austin about the concern. Lee shared his own experience working as a sub and highlighted challenges faced by rural districts . Watch the full story here.


A federal judge ruled Thursday, Sept. 24, that President Donald Trump cannot stop the U.S. Census count next week, ordering it instead to continue through October 31. This is the deadline U.S. Census Bureau originally requested before the Trump administration decided to shorten that window. You can read more about the court decision in this article by the Texas Tribune.

The census is constitutionally required every 10 years in order to apportion seats in the U.S. Congress. Many important decisions, including how federal funding is distributed, depend on how communities respond to the census. The census also determines how much power each state wields in Congress, and Texas is on track to add representatives if everyone responds on time. Read more about the census in this recent blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


ELECTION UPDATE: Today is the last day of early voting in Texas Senate District (SD) 30, where a special election is scheduled for next Tuesday, Sept. 29. This election is to finish the term of outgoing state Sen. Pat Fallon (R-Prosper), who is running for U.S. Congress.

Earlier this week we recognized National Voter Registration Day. October 5 is the deadline to register to vote in time for the November 3 election if you are not already registered. Click here to find out if you are registered and your information is correct, especially if you have moved. Early voting for every position from president on down begins October 13 and lasts for three weeks through October 30. Find more voting dates and reminders here.

Voting is the only way to ensure people who support public education are the ones making the decisions about public education. For more on who makes those decisions, check out this post by our partners in the Texas Educators Vote coalition. Also, click here to learn about candidate forums being sponsored by Raise Your Hand Texas starting next week.

Happy National Voter Registration Day!

September 22 is National Voter Registration Day across the United States. Are you registered to vote? When’s the last time you checked your voter registration status? Looking for voter resources? We’ve got you covered! 

First, the November 3 election is right around the corner. Don’t let it sneak up on you. Texans, be sure to mark these important dates in your calendars:

  • September 22 (today!): National Voter Registration Day
  • October 5: Deadline to register to vote
  • October 13: First day of early voting
  • October 19: Educator Voting Day
  • October 23: Last day that a vote-by-mail application can be received (not postmarked)
  • October 30: Last day of early voting
  • November 3: Election Day! Mail-in ballots also must be received by this date.

Visit votetexas.gov to check your voter registration status, download a ballot-by-mail application, find your polling location, and more. Do you have questions about voting by mail? Check out the “So, You’re Thinking about Voting by Mail” article on our Teach the Vote advocacy blog.

Below are a few more resources for Texas voters:

  • Have your students participate in Democracy Powered by You(th). Whether your students are eligible to vote or not, they can still lend their voice to the upcoming election and make a difference. Check out the first-ever Democracy Powered by You(th) voter registration competition, a multi-organization effort to build a coalition of youth voters.
  • Read our advocacy blog. For in-depth coverage of the upcoming election, including updates on key races and issues, read our advocacy blog at teachthevote.org/news.
  • Know your candidates. Information is power! Check teachthevote.org/races to learn more about the candidates and see how your state legislators voted on education issues.
  • Follow us on Twitter. For breaking news and advocacy insights, keep up with our lobby team on Twitter @TeachTheVote.
  • Check out TexasEducatorsVote.comThis website from our nonpartisan, educator-focused coalition offers a plethora of additional resources on participating in elections.
  • Prepare your ballot ahead of time. Use vote411.org to make a sample ballot to print out and take with you to the polls.

Don’t forget to share these dates and resources with your colleagues and friends. Only by coming together and acting as one voice can we truly advocate for public education! Make a plan, and vote for your public schools, your students, and your profession.

Texas election roundup: More court rulings

A pair of court decisions this week could make a significant impact on the November elections.

On Tuesday, the Texas Supreme Court ruled that three Green Party candidates must be restored to the November ballot, despite a lower court’s order to remove them because they had not paid the required filing fees. The conventional wisdom is that Green Party candidates tend to attract some voters who may have otherwise voted for a Democrat, and their presence in a close race could tip the balance toward the Republican candidate. The Texas Democratic Party filed the original complaint to remove the candidates, while the Republican justices on the Texas Supreme Court overturned the decision.

Another Texas Supreme Court decision announced Tuesday blocked Harris County from sending mail-in ballot applications to all registered voters in the county. As previously reported here at Teach the Vote, ballot applications are not the same as ballots themselves. In the Harry County case, voters would still have to make the determination of whether they are eligible to apply to vote by mail, then fill out and return the application in order to receive an actual ballot in the mail. If think you may be eligible and are considering voting by mail, check out this post by Teach the Vote that explains the process in detail.

These decisions underscore the importance of every single vote in this election. These decisions are likely to impact a relatively small number of votes, but the reason they are the subject of litigation in the first place is an acknowledgement of just how close the November elections could be.

Now onto lighter topics!

If you watched ABC this week, you may have caught the network special VOMO: Vote or Miss Out. The comedy special hosted by Kevin Hart featured guest appearances by Tiffany Hadish, Michelle Obama, Tim Allen, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and other celebrities urging Americans to vote. If you need a little comedic motivation, you can watch the full special here or watch clips on YouTube.

The Texas Tribune reported this week that new voter registrations in Texas have plummeted during the COVID-19 pandemic. The deadline to register to vote in the November 3 election is less than three weeks away. Voters have until October 5 to register to vote if you have not already done so in the county in which you plan to cast your ballot. If you’re unsure whether you are registered, you can use this tool on the Texas Secretary of State’s website. For more information about registering, click here.