Tag Archives: election results

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 17, 2020

This week’s news includes election analysis, ATPE’s updated recommendations for safely reopening schools, and a key announcement from the state today giving districts slightly more flexibility to operate virtually at the beginning of the school year. Read about these developments and more in this week’s wrap-up from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


This week, ATPE released an updated set of comprehensive recommendations for reopening schools that prioritize safety, the involvement of educators and parents in decision making, and local flexibility. The ATPE plan calls for the state to develop a framework using objective medical data such as the test positivity rate, hospitalizations, or newly confirmed COVID-19 cases as potential gating criteria for decisions on when it is safe to reopen schools for in-person instruction. In a statement, ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes said the framework will “minimize the risk of hasty reopening decisions based on politics, rather than prioritizing the health and safety of students and school employees.” In our recommendations, ATPE also urges the state to suspend standardized testing in the 2020-21 school year, as urged by the ATPE House of Delegates last week. These recommendations were sent in a letter to Governor Abbott and Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath.

Read more about the ATPE proposal in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark WigginsATPE members can use our premier advocacy tool Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials regarding the ATPE plan for reopening and other concerns they may have with regard to the return to school.


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: Last week’s release of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) public health guidance left educators wanting more specificity and clarity on the health and safety aspects of the return to in-person instruction this fall. This week, snippets of new information indicating a relaxation of in-person schooling requirements trickled through news outlets, based on interviews with the governor and TEA officials. Today the agency posted more official guidance on its website, along with a press release and video by Commissioner Mike Morath.

As foreshadowed in reporting by the Texas Tribune, the new public health guidance that TEA issued today enables districts to operate virtually for the first four weeks of school (instead of three), with an additional four weeks of transition possible under local school board decision-making authority and a waiver from the state. A caveat to this new flexibility is that districts must provide in-person instruction to any student who does not have Internet access or the devices necessary to participate in virtual instruction, even during the transition period. Additionally, under the new TEA guidance districts can offer a hybrid instructional model for high school students only in order to stagger the number of students on campus at any given time. Read more about today’s developments in this blog post on Teach the Vote.

Updates to TEA’s COVID-19 Support and Guidance Page this week included additional updates to the public health orders page regarding personal protective equipment (PPE) procurement and distribution and a document outlining the informal selection process for symptom-screening mobile and web-based applications that districts may use. Updates to instructional continuity included new operation connectivity resources, sample school instructional models, and new Texas Home Learning resources. The waivers, finance, and grants page was updated with information about new federal funding, the CARES Act, and equitable services FAQs. The TEA website also added new information for the high school hybrid waiver and extended transition period waiver announced today, and updates to the attendance and enrollment FAQ to reflect the changes shared today. The Texas educators support page was also updated with an FAQ document about leave and resignation.

As educators learn of their district’s plans, they frequently have questions regarding their health and safety and professional rights and responsibilities. Visit the ATPE COVID-19 FAQ and Resources page for the constantly updated resources and answers to common questions.


ELECTION UPDATE: Texas voters decided primary runoff races across Texas this week, leading to some surprise wins and losses. Turnout in runoff elections is typically low, but this year’s runoffs saw higher turnout than in previous years. While Election Day turnout wasn’t immediately available, turnout data during early voting showed a significant increase in participation — though still far from the numbers we see during the November elections. Read a full rundown on this week’s election results in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


FEDERAL UPDATE: Vice President Mike Pence last week indicated the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) would be issuing new school reopening guidelines today, but the federal health agency now says it expects to release those new guidelines by the end of this month. On Capitol Hill, the House Education and Labor Committee has planned a July 23 hearing of its Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee to examine recommendations for safely reopening schools. The committee asked CDC Director Robert Redfield to testify at the hearing, but media reports out of Washington late today say the White House will prohibit Redfield from appearing at the meeting.

Tonja Gray

Jimmy Lee

ATPE State President Tonja Gray and Vice President Jimmy Lee participated in virtual meetings this week with some of the Texas congressional delegation, including members of the House education committee. In addition to discussing school reopening concerns and the need for more federal funding to help schools deal with COVID-19, ATPE also urged the congressmen to take needed action on Social Security reform and replacing the harmful Windfall Elimination Provision. Additional meetings are scheduled for next week.

Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and the White House are continuing to push for in-person instruction in the fall. DeVos spoke with both CNN and Fox News this week and reiterated previous sentiments that the CDC guidelines for reopening were flexible and that states should expand school choice. To CNN, DeVos said, “There is nothing in the data that would suggest that kids being back in school is dangerous to them,” which is contrary to data that shows children are being infected by COVID-19. Even the American Academy of Pediatrics, often cited by President Trump, DeVos, and TEA as an authority on handling the return to school, has joined national education groups in recommending that reopening be subject to the advice of local health experts.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) Board of Trustees convened virtually this week for its regularly scheduled meeting. The board discussed a number of agenda items including the current financial market in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, TRS-Care and ActiveCare, the fiscal year 2021 budget, highlights of the agency’s preliminary legislative appropriations request, and updated considerations on TRS space planning. View board materials and archived video of the three-day meeting here. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for a blog post coming soon with additional highlights of the meeting.


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) will meet next Friday, July 24, to take up an agenda that includes implementation of the new Science of Teaching Reading exam requirements from last year’s House Bill (HB) 3 and a discussion of COVID-19 considerations related to certification. Additionally, the agenda includes a proposed rule that would remove the expiration date on the Legacy Master Teacher certificates. This change, heavily pushed for by ATPE, will protect Legacy Master Teacher certificate holders from the unintended consequences of HB 3, which repealed the authorization for Master Teacher certificates and barred them from being renewed. Check back on Teach the Vote next week for an update on the meeting.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Nov. 8, 2019

Happy Election Week! Here are your highlights of this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


ELECTION UPDATE: Thank you to all who voted in Tuesday’s general election!

All three special elections to fill vacated Texas House of Representatives seats are headed to runoffs. Additionally, of the 10 constitutional amendments on the ballot Tuesday, nine were approved by voters. Check out this election results post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins to learn more about how candidates and ballot measures fared on Nov. 5. Wiggins also has you covered on nationwide election news, including the recent exit from the presidential race of former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke. This just in: State Rep. Poncho Nevarez (D-Eagle Pass) announced late Friday he will not run for reelection in 2020. Nevarez chairs the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee. You can read more about his announcement in this post by the Texas Tribune.

In additional election-related news, our friends at TexasISD.com report that local voters passed 81 percent of the 63 school district bond elections held around the state during Tuesday’s election. When votes were tallied up, more than 93 percent of the total value sought by all districts statewide being approved. These high passage rates are a continued sign that the public overwhelmingly supports their local public schools and additional spending on those schools’ and students’ needs.

If you didn’t get the chance to vote this time, your next opportunity will be the primary election on March 3, 2020. The deadline to register to vote in the primary is Feb. 3, 2020. Check to see if you are registered to vote here. Need some inspiration? Read ATPE Lobbyist and former educator Andrea Chevalier’s voting story.


Do you have a couple of minutes to spare? The ATPE Governmental Relations team invites all ATPE members to take a short, three-question survey about the most recent legislative session and your education priorities. Help us best represent your voice at the Texas Capitol by taking our new “Your Voice” survey on ATPE’s Advocacy Central. You must be signed into the ATPE website as a member to participate in the survey, so call the ATPE Member Services department at (800) 777-2873 if you’ve forgotten your password.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced on Wednesday plans for the state to take over management of Houston ISD and two rural school districts, Shepherd ISD and Snyder ISD. Commissioner of Education Mike Morath cited two reasons for the takeover of Houston ISD: “failure of governance” and the consistent under-performance of Wheatley High School in the district. Houston ISD serves over 200,000 students. The takeover of all three school districts will entail replacement of each elected school board by a state-appointed Board of Managers and the appointment of a state conservator. Learn more in this reporting from the Texas Tribune.


This week the U.S. Secret Service’s National Threat Assessment Center released a comprehensive analysis of targeted school violence. The report, focused on K-12 schools for the period of 2008 to 2017, details common trends among the school attacks. One significant finding was that, while there is no typical “profile” of a perpetrator, they do exhibit certain warning signs and traits. These include having been a victim of bullying, an adverse childhood experience, a mental health issue, access to firearms, and motive typically involving a grievance with classmates or school staff. Read a summary of the report from Education Week here, or read the full report here.

Back home in Texas, the House Select Committee on Mass Violence Prevention and Community Safety held its third public meeting this week. The hearing took place in Odessa, the site of one of the recent shooting attacks that garnered national attention. The committee heard several hours of testimony from local families and law enforcement, some of whom had lost loved ones in the Midland and Odessa shooting on Aug. 31, 2019. Testifiers pleaded for a more effective background check system and the integration of mental health information into the public safety system. Legislators and law enforcement officials discussed prevention strategies focused on more cohesive communication, such as a regional communications center. A recording of the hearing can be found here. Read more about the hearing from local CBS7 in Midland here.


Next week on Teach the Vote, we’ll be updating all state legislators’ profiles on our website to incorporate voting records from the 86th legislative session. ATPE’s lobbyists have analyzed all the education-related votes taken during the 2019 legislative session and selected a collection of recorded votes that will help Texans find out how their own lawmakers voted on major public education issues and ATPE’s legislative priorities. By sharing this information, we hope to help voters gain insight into legislative incumbents’ views on public education so that they can make informed decisions at the polls during the critical 2020 election cycle.

The candidate filing period opens this weekend for those seeking a place on the ballot in 2020. Once the candidate filing period ends, ATPE will be updating our Teach the Vote website to include profiles of all the candidates vying for seats in the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education. Stay tuned!