Tag Archives: drive-through voting

Texas election roundup: Less than two weeks remaining!

There are less than two weeks, and only one weekend, remaining to vote in the 2020 elections, and the clock is ticking! Early voting continues through Friday, October 30, with Election Day on November 3.


The presidential candidates wrapped up their second and final debate of the campaign season last night in Nashville, Tennessee. The final debate had been rescheduled by the Commission on Presidential Debates after an earlier townhall-style event was canceled when the president contracted COVID-19. Now the campaigns will go their separate ways for the remainder of the election. A new Quinnipiac University poll this week showed Donald Trump and Joe Biden tied at 47% each among likely Texas voters. A rolling average of recent polls tracked by RealClearPolitics shows Trump with a 4% advantage in Texas.


The Texas Tribune reports that 5.9 million Texans have voted early as of October 21, or about 34.7% of registered voters. Of those, 4.3% submitted their ballots by mail. According to early voting statistics compiled by Republican consultant Derek Ryan, 32.1% of early voters last voted in a Republican primary, compared to 29.0% who last voted in a Democratic primary. Another 26.3% have voted in a general election but have no primary election voting history, and 12.7% of the early voters have no history of voting in any election before now.

The Texas Supreme Court continued to release election-related decisions this week. The state’s highest court ruled in favor of Harris County on Thursday and tossed out a challenge by the Republican Party of Texas to block drive-through voting in the state’s largest county. This means voters in Harris County can continue to visit one of 10 drive-through voting locations set up by the county to allow voters fearing COVID-19 to cast ballots from the safety of their automobiles.


In the race for U.S. Senate here in Texas, Democratic candidate MJ Hegar reported raising three times as much as incumbent Republican Sen. John Cornyn in the first half of October, $3.7 million to $1.3 million. Hegar also ended with more money in the bank, $6.9 million to $3.8 million. Both candidates spent around the same amount, with Cornyn spending $5.6 million and Hegar spending $5.3 million. This week’s Quinnipiac poll shows Cornyn with a 6% advantage over Hegar, 49% to 43%.


Speaking of polls, Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey points out in this handy video how polls have their strengths and weaknesses. Many polls in 2016 inaccurately predicted Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton would win the presidential election. Polls are based on estimates of what the electorate will look like, and predicting that is part art and part science. Polls are generally quite accurate, but unexpected changes in the electorate can throw off a poll’s results. Pollsters have therefore spent the years since 2016 trying to develop better models of the electorate, especially at the state level. A poll is also a snapshot of a single moment in time, which is why you see margins shift over the course of an election cycle. The best way to consume polling information is to look at an average of recent polls.

The first two weeks of early voting have already set records, and there is still a full week of early voting left! If you haven’t voted yet, go to the candidates section here at Teach the Vote and research the races based on your address. Then make your plan to go vote with the aid of this handy guide. Your vote is the single most impactful tool you have to ensure our schools are safe, healthy, and well-funded. Now get out there and exercise it!

Texas election roundup: Early voting breaking records

Early voting is now underway in Texas, and over one million Texans have already cast their ballots! If you haven’t voted yet, you have until October 30 for early voting and Election Day is November 3!

Voters in Harris County cast nearly 170,000 ballots on the first day of early voting, up from 130,000 in 2016. The total includes both in-person and mail-in ballots received on the first day of early voting. According to the Texas Tribune, first day early voting in the state’s ten largest counties was 6.71% in 2020, compared to 5.82% in 2016 — roughly a 15% increase in turnout.

High turnout is always a good sign, but it’s too soon to draw many conclusions after just two days of early voting. The first day of early voting was also not without incident. Issues in Fort Bend, Tarrant, and Travis Counties led to some voters waiting five hours or more. The counties moved quickly to resolve those problems and if the increased voter participation numbers are sustained, Texas could be on the path to record turnout.

Even as Texans headed to the polls, the courts continued to hand down decisions this week affecting their ability to vote. Harris County, which is home to 4.7 million people and spans nearly 1,800 square miles, had set up 12 locations for voters to drop off mail-in ballots. The Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled Monday that Gov. Greg Abbott could limit counties to a single drop-off location for mail-in ballots, forcing Harris County to close all but one of its drop-off locations. On Wednesday, a state appeals court allowed drive-through and curbside voting to continue in Harris County by rejecting a lawsuit filed by the Republican Party of Texas to block the service.

A new poll by the University of Texas/Texas Tribune found that 62% of registered Texas voters believe the U.S. is on the wrong track. The same poll showed 41% believe the state of Texas is headed in the right direction, compared to 44% who believe it’s on the wrong track. Respondents listed the coronavirus/COVID-19 (18%), political corruption/leadership (14%), and the economy (10%) as the most important issues facing the country right now. The poll showed Republican Donald Trump leading Democrat Joe Biden 50% to 45% in the presidential race here in Texas.

Gov. Greg Abbott has set a special runoff election for Saturday, December 19, to fill the seat in Senate District (SD) 30 being vacated by state Sen. Pat Fallon (R-Prosper). The runoff will be between state Rep. Drew Springer (R-Muenster) and Dallas-area salon owner and Republican Shelley Luther, who led Springer in the special election by just 164 votes. Early voting for the special runoff election will begin Wednesday, December 9.

Before you head to the polls, make sure you arm yourself with resources that will enable you to maximize the impact of your vote. It’s always smart to check your county website first in order to find out the nearest polling location and hours. Many county websites also list current wait times at polling locations! If you need help finding your county’s website, check here. You can also check out this handy checklist for in-person voting by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier. And as always, make sure to visit the candidates tab here at Teach the Vote in order to do your research on the education views of those running for office in your area. Now get out there and vote!