Tag Archives: career and technical education (CTE)

President releases education budget proposal for 2021

On February 10, 2020, President Donald Trump released his budget proposal, which is a statement of  his administration’s spending priorities across all sectors of government. Because the president’s budget is merely a proposal, any of these funding amounts would still need to be approved by Congress in order to be enacted. Historically, Congress has largely ignored President Trump’s funding proposals for education.

The education portion of the president’s 2021 budget recommendation is focused on “education freedom.” While cutting funding for the U.S. Department of Education by $5.6 billion, the proposal requests funds to provide up to $5 billion annually in “Education Freedom Scholarships.”  Using these funds, states would be free to design their own scholarship programs, which could be used to send public dollars to private schools. This requested increase in voucher funding reflects the president’s statements during his State of the Union address last week, which my fellow ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins reported on here and here for Teach the Vote.

Trump’s proposal also consolidates 29 federal education programs into one block grant totaled at $19.4 billion, which is $4.7 billion less than Congress approved for these programs in 2020. A list of the programs can be found here (see p. 9), which includes 21st Century Learning Centers, charter schools, school safety national activities, and the $16 billion Title I Grants. This change purportedly would cut the role of the Department of Education significantly by reducing staffing and administrative costs. Though this is labeled a “block grant,” funds would still be allocated using the Title I formulas. The proposal indicates that states and school districts could use the funds on any of the consolidated programs and would still have to follow key accountability and reporting requirements.

Consistent with the president’s affinity for career and technical education (CTE), the proposal also includes $2 billion for CTE state grants and $90 million for CTE national programs. Part of this $763 million increase would be funded by a proposal to double the fee for H1-B visas.

The president’s 2021 budget recommendation includes an increase of $100 million in funding for Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part B grant funding, for a total of $12.8 billion. This increase is relatively small considering the overall funding needs for students with disabilities. (Texas appropriated over $2 billion for this purpose during the 86th legislative session.)

As was the case in previous presidential budget requests from the Trump administration, the proposal eliminates the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, citing that it “unfairly favors some career choices over others.”

Review past reporting on President Trump’s budget requests for the 2018, 2019, and 2020 fiscal years here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Jan. 31, 2020

As January ends, we hope you are registered to vote ahead of Super Tuesday on March 3! In the meantime, here’s this week’s education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


ELECTION UPDATE: Special elections in three Texas House districts concluded on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. The victors were Gary Gates (R) with 58.05% of the vote in House District (HD) 28, Lorraine Birabil (D) with 66.28% of the vote in HD 100, and Anna Eastman (D) with 65.47% of the vote in HD 148. Read more on the results in this election night blog post by ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell.

Early voting for the primary starts in just under three weeks on February 18, 2020, which is also Educator Voting Day. Primary election day follows two weeks later on March 3, 2020. Remember that the deadline to register to vote in the Texas primaries is Monday, Feb. 3. Verify your voter registration status here.

As the primaries get closer, here are helpful resources for educators and the general public:

  • Learn more about candidates running in 2020 for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education by checking out their profiles here on Teach the Vote, which include answers to the ATPE Candidate Survey (where available) and legislators’ voting records.
  • Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com for election resources, advice, and voting reminders.
  • The Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation is hosting “For the Future” education-oriented candidate forums around the state. Click here for details.

This week ATPE submitted public comments on three proposed changes to administrative rules that would affect public schools, educators, and students.

First, ATPE formally commented on proposed changes to commissioner’s rules that regulate school district-charter partnerships. Senate Bill 1882 of 2017 enabled school districts to partner with charter entities to operate some of their campuses, and newly proposed rules have raised some concerns for ATPE and other education stakeholders. Read our comments here.

Next, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is proposing changes to its certification rules that could benefit high school students interested in pursuing careers in the classroom. ATPE and the Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE) submitted joint recommendations this week for the criteria associated with the educational aide certificate. Those interested in submitting input on this rule proposal can find more information here. The deadline for public comments is Feb. 3, 2020.

Finally, ATPE also shared ouir concerns with SBEC about rules relating to master teacher certificates that are slated to be eliminated as a result of last year’s House Bill 3. Those wishing to submit public comments on this rule review can find more information here. The deadline is Feb. 3.

As you can see, our advocacy for public education doesn’t stop when the legislative session ends. During the interim, it is important to stay engaged with the work of state boards and agencies implementing education laws and legislative committees as they study interim charges. Learn more about interim advocacy in this new blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


Image sourced from THGC.

This week, Texans observed Holocaust Remembrance Week as designated by Gov. Greg Abbott after the 86th Legislature passed Senate Bill (SB) 1828 by Sen. José Menéndez in 2019. The Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission (THGC) recommended the observance this week so as to include International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27, which when Auschwitz was liberated. Also this week, in Washington, DC, the U.S. House passed H.R. 943, referred to as the “Never Again Education Act” to provide grants and resources for Holocaust education programs. Find more information and related links in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


The State Board of Education (SBOE) met today, Jan. 31, 2020, to conclude its week-long January meeting. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins attended the meeting and provided this update.

Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence), who chairs the Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund (PSF), updated members on the status of the fund. He reported that the PSF’s investments total $46.5 billion, and the fund is being utilized as collateral to guarantee $87 billion in bonds out of a $117 billion bond guarantee capacity. Of the bonds backed by the PSF, $85 billion of those are bonds for independent school districts, and $2 billion are bonds for charter schools.

The SBOE manages a portion of the PSF, while the School Land Board (SLB) under the General Land Office (GLO) manages the other portion. Legislation passed during the 2019 legislative session to address a dispute over PSF management expanded the SLB from three members to five, two of whom would be recommended by the SBOE. Those two members have now been seated on the SLB, and the SBOE is working on setting up a joint meeting in April.

The board spent much of the morning Friday discussing board training requirements for local school district trustees, and ultimately decided to maintain the current rules unchanged. Members also voted to give preliminary approval to curriculum standards for a new course on African-American studies, which would make Texas the fifth state in the nation to offer such a course, according to TEA officials.

Earlier in the week, ATPE’s Wiggins reported on one of the board committee’s discussion about the application process for charter schools and on Education Commissioner Mike Morath’s presentation to the full board on Tuesday with an annual update from the Texas Education Agency.


Today, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) released the 2019-20 accreditation statuses for Texas public school districts and open-enrollment charter schools. Accreditation statuses encapsulate a wide variety of factors, such as financial and academic accountability and compliance with reporting requirements. Districts and charters that are assigned anything other than an accredited status must notify parents and property owners in the district. Find your district’s status here.


 

House Public Education Committee hears Senate bills on virtual schools, school safety

On Tuesday, May 7, 2019, the House Public Education Committee heard seven Senate bills on a variety of topics.

ATPE supported several of these bills, including the following:

  • SB 11 (Taylor, R-Friendswood): Would require several provisions intended to increase school safety, including TEA-developed facilities standards, mental health and substance use resources, safety training, improved coordination with the Texas School Safety Center, digital citizenship, threat assessment teams and threat reporting, and district-developed trauma-informed care policies.
  • SB 2042 (Fallon, R-Prosper): Would require TEA to study, evaluate, and report on current industry certifications, certificates being offered, workforce needs and any unmet needs, by each geographic region in Texas.
  • SB 2073 (Taylor, R-Friendswood): Would allow districts providing less than 180 days of student instruction during the school year to reduce the educators’ required days of service in proportion without reducing an educator’s salary. This is to address the state’s shift to minutes, rather than days, of instruction.

ATPE provided written testimony on SB 1455 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood). ATPE believes that the bill as it left the Senate would greatly expand virtual schools, which is problematic because a growing body of evidence indicates full-time virtual school programs are a poor substitute for brick-and-mortar classrooms. Students enrolled in full-time virtual schools regularly underperform their peers enrolled in traditional classroom settings, as indicated by the multiple Improvement Required (IR) designations. Read our written testimony here.

ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testifies neutrally on a proposed committee substitute for SB 1455 in the House Public Education Committee, May 7, 2019.

Rep. Ken King (R-Canadian) laid out a newer version of SB 1455 in committee this morning, stating substantive changes to eliminate the portions of the bill that he believes constitute a virtual voucher while maintaining the increased accountability for virtual school providers. ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter testified neutrally due to these changes in the proposed substitute bill. Exter explained that ATPE supports accountability standards for virtual schools that eliminate bad actors but is opposed to the expansion of virtual schools due to a significant amount of research on their limited effectiveness in promoting student learning.

The following bills were also heard by the Committee:

  • SB 1453 (Taylor, R-Friendswood): Would require school districts to allow students who are enrolled in courses requiring the use of a graphing calculator to use calculator applications on their phones or other devices.
  • SB 1776 (Campbell, R-New Braunfels): Would allow school district boards of trustees to permit and encourage schools to post the founding documents of the United States and would also require districts to provide a high school elective course on the founding principles of the United States.
  • SB 2180 (Nelson, R-Flower Mound): Would require the State Board of Education (SBOE) to create Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) that include coding, computer programming, computational thinking, and cybersecurity. Would also require TEA to create a computer science advisory committee to develop and provide recommendations for increasing computer science instruction and participation in public schools.

Chairman Huberty noted that the committee will vote on bills this afternoon. Based on tradition and previous statements from the chair, the House Public Education Committee will likely meet again next Tuesday, May 14, 2019, at 8 A.M.

House Public Education Committee hears bills on pre-K, tech apps, educator prep, data transparency, and more

On Tuesday, April 2, 2019, the House Public Education Committee heard several bills related to a variety of topics.

ATPE registered positions in support of three of the bills heard in committee:

  • House Bill (HB) 1517 (Coleman, D-Houston): Would require schools, including charters, to notify parents if they do not have a full-time nurse for 30 or more consecutive instructional days. The bill excludes schools that enroll fewer than 10,000 students.
  • HB 2030 (Turner, John, D-Dallas): Would allow eligible three-year-olds enrolled in pre-K to continue their eligibility the next school year, which helps parents avoid intensive paperwork of re-registration and reduces the administrative burden on districts.
  • HB 2184 (Allen, D-Houston): Would create collaborative policies for improving a student’s transition from an alternative education setting back to the regular classroom. A committee substitute for the bill clarifies that teachers who implement the transition plan are included on the planning committee.

The following bills were also heard by the committee:

  • HB 963 (Bell, C., R-Magnolia): Would add technology applications courses to the career and technical education (CTE) allotment, so that students in those courses would receive the same weighted funding as students in CTE courses.
  • HB 1468 (Talarico, D-Round Rock): Would create a “public school mental health task force” to determine the effectiveness of school counseling programs and ways to improve school climate and report that data to the Texas Education Agency (TEA).
  • HB 2984 (Allison, R-San Antonio): Would require the State Board of Education (SBOE) to add essential knowledge and skills (TEKS) to the technology applications curriculum related to coding, computer programming, computational thinking, and cybersecurity. One witness noted that the TEKS are set to be revised in 2021 regardless.
  • HB 3007 (Turner, Chris, D-Grand Prairie) Would require TEA to provide districts all source data that was used in computing their accountability ratings. Rep. Turner stated that districts are not given access to all the data used to determine their A-F accountability ratings and that his bill gives districts the opportunity to view the data during the appeals process. Witnesses representing Arlington ISD, who requested the bill, testified that their college, career, and military readiness data was missing information on 206 students.
  • HB 3217 (Ashby, R-Lufkin): Would reauthorize institutions of higher education to offer a bachelor’s degree in education and eliminate the 18-semester-hour cap on the number of education courses allowed for a degree. One witness testified against the bill, stating that Texas needs subject matter specialists and that content hours should not be decreased. The Texas Association of Colleges for Teacher Education spoke to the importance of pedagogy and testified that students would not experience longer degrees as a result of the bill.
  • HB 3323 (Burns, R-Cleburne): Would require a school district to post employment policy documents on its website.
  • HB 3435 (Bowers, D-Garland): Would establish March 1 as Texas Girls in STEM Day.
  • HB 3966 (Raymond, D-Laredo:  Would require the governor to designate Holocaust Remembrance Week in public schools.
  • HB 3710 (Bell, K., R-Forney): Would require TEA to develop free, electronic tutorials for end-of-course assessments at an estimated cost of $3/student.
  • HB 4310 (Dutton, D-Houston): Would require districts to allow teachers sufficient time to teach a given curriculum and states that districts may not penalize a teacher for failing to follow the scope and sequence timeline if the teacher determines that the students need more learning time.
  • HB 4487 (Frullo, R-Lubbock): States that students sent to the campus behavior coordinator are not considered to have been removed from the classroom for purposes of reporting in the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS).
  • HCR 59 (Guillen, D-Rio Grande City): Would designate the second week of November as School Psychologist Appreciation Week.

The House Public Education Committee will meet again on Thursday, April 4, to hear bills on UIL and student health, and again on Tuesday, April 9, to hear bills related to charter schools. In news from the full House, Chairman Huberty’s school finance and tax reform bill, House Bill 3, will be up for debate in the House chamber on Wednesday, April 3. Follow @TeachtheVote and your ATPE lobbyists (@ATPE_AndreaC, @ATPE_MontyE, @ATPE_JenniferM, and @markwigginstx) on Twitter for updates on the action!

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 27, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


The Board of Directors for the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) met this week to discuss the pension fund’s assumed rate of return. Today the board voted to reduce the rate of return from 8% to 7.25%, anticipating a decline in investment revenue. It is now up to the legislature to provide additional funding for TRS in order to prevent a shortfall and stretch the already dwindling resources of educators even further. ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter testified at the TRS board meeting and explains more about the decision in this post, which also includes a fact sheet provided by TRS staff.


 This week the Senate Select Committee on Violence in Schools and School Security met to discuss the last of the four charges assigned to them by the Lt. Governor. The panel heard invited and public testimony regarding best practices for preventing violence in schools and other topics. Not much longer after the hearing, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick released a statement in which he said he would not support “red flag” laws, laws aimed at seizing the guns of those deemed a danger to themselves or others, citing failed legislation from last session as well as Gov. Abbott’s recent reticence to support red flag laws. The committee will now deliberate and release a report during the first week of August. More details about the hearing can be found in this post by ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann.


Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick currently has no plans to debate his Democratic opponent, Mike Collier, despite repeated calls from the Collier campaign and many voters interested in the race for lieutenant governor. In a statement to the Texas Tribune, Allen Blakemore, a strategist for the Patrick campaign said the following:

“It’s no secret Lt. Governor Patrick relishes debates, but since his opponent shows no sign of grasping even the most basic rudiments of state government, our campaign has no plans to debate him,”

In response to this statement, the grassroots educators group Texans for Public Education offered to facilitate the debate by offering assistance “with location,  moderation, with time and date…” and other details. The full statement from the group can be read here.

Read more in this story from the Texas Tribune.


Earlier this week, both the U.S. House and Senate approved legislation aimed at revising the federal law that governs career and technical education (CTE). The Senate first passed a bill reauthorizing the Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. The House concurred with the Senate’s changes and the bill was sent to the President. At this time, President Trump has not yet signed the bill, but it is likely that he will. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann provides more information here.


Congress sends CTE overhaul to President Trump

Congress passed legislation this week to rewrite the primary federal law concerning career and technical education (CTE). The bill now goes to President Trump for his signature.

On Monday, the Senate passed its version of a bill to reauthorize the Perkins Career and Technical Education Act by a voice vote. The upper chamber amended a reauthorization bill already passed by the U.S. House, H.R. 2353, with substitute text containing the Senate’s preferred language to reauthorize the law. The U.S. Senate education committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN), said the bill limits the role of the Department of Education (ED), giving states more freedom to make decisions about how to utilize federal CTE funding.

The House quickly responded on Wednesday by agreeing to the Senate’s changes and sending the bill to President Trump’s desk for his signature. The Trump Administration has been increasingly supportive of the legislation. White House advisor Ivanka Trump has actively supported passage of the legislation and President Trump released a statement on Wednesday saying that “by enacting it into law, we will continue to prepare students for today’s constantly shifting job market, and we will help employers find the workers they need to compete.”

Still, groups like the Association for Career and Technical Education and Advance CTE and the American Association of School Administrators have expressed opposition for varying reasons. The CTE group expressed concern once the Senate bill was passed that it leaves the potential for unambitious state performance targets and low academic standards for CTE students. The administrators have previously called the legislation too prescriptive.

As we have previously outlined, current funding levels will be continued, and the bill gives states more authority in crafting their goals, as long as they are aligned with requirements under the bill. States will be required to meet those goals within two years or face a potential loss of funding. The bill does provide for some additional funding that will be disseminated to states based on population. President Trump is expected to sign the bill soon.