Tag Archives: campaign

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Jan. 17, 2020

As you slip into the three-day weekend and celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. on Monday, take a look at this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


ELECTION UPDATE: We have just over a month until the Texas primary election on March 3, 2020. Check out ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins’s most recent election-related blog post for the latest campaign finance insights and other tidbits. Remember that the deadline to register to vote in one of the primaries is Feb. 3, and you can verify your voter registration status here.

As the primaries get closer, here are some helpful resources for educators and the general public:

  • Learn more about the candidates by checking out their profiles here on Teach the Vote. All candidates running in 2020 for the Texas House or Senate or the State Board of Education are featured on our website, with their answers to the ATPE Candidate Survey (where available) and existing legislators’ voting records on education issues.
  • TexasEducatorsVote.com is another great source for election-related resources, advice, and voting reminders.
  • Learn everything you need to know about Texas elections in the Texas Tribune’s five-week crash course called “Teach Me How to Texas.” It’s free and fun! Click here to sign up.
  • Additionally, check out the upcoming candidate forums around the state being sponsored by the Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation. Click here for details and the full list of their “For the Future” town hall events beginning this month.

RELATED: If you live the Houston or Dallas area, don’t forget about the upcoming runoff election for three vacant House seats in House Districts 28, 100, and 148. Early voting starts Tuesday, Jan. 21. Registered voters in those districts can vote in the runoff even they skipped the first special election back in November. Learn more about the special election candidates on our Resources page.


ATPE’s Monty Exter

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) held a public hearing on Monday regarding proposed new commissioner’s rules affecting expansion of charter schools in Texas. ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter joined other education stakeholders, including school district leaders and parents, at the hearing to testify on proposed revisions to the charter performance framework and charter expansion amendment process. Their input focused on concerns about the potential for significant expansion of charter schools with little state oversight or consideration of the fiscal consequences or impact on students.

Specific points offered through the testimony included the following:

  • TEA does not consider proximity to existing campuses when approving new charter school campuses, which can lead to duplication, waste, and inefficiency. Existing school districts near the new charter campus retain fixed costs but receive less funding.
  • State law requires TEA to consider the impact on all students served by the Texas public school system when proposing rule changes like these. This includes the economic impact of a program serving only a small subset of students and the educational impact on students, especially if the local population is not large enough to support robust programming at both the existing school(s) and the added charter campus in the same location.
  • TEA already has approved more than 557,000 seats at charter schools, which exceeds the enrollment level on which the state’s budget is based. If all those seats were filled, it would cost the state more than $11 billion over a two-year period s and consume more than a quarter of the funding under the Foundation School Program. Moreover, this maximum approved enrollment capacity of 557,000 would grow even larger under the commissioner’s proposals.
  • The state’s performance framework should not reward charter operators for things like maintaining their status as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, which is already required by law.
  • A charter operator should not be labeled “high quality” if its performance is based on excluding students with disabilities or filtering out other students who are harder to teach. Under federal law, TEA must ensure all public schools identify, enroll, and serve special education students.

ATPE joined more than a dozen other education advocacy groups in submitting formal written comments to the commissioner, as well. Click here and here to read the text of the proposed rule changes that were published in the Texas Register on Nov. 22 and Nov. 29, 2019, respectively.


Thank you to all ATPE members who took our very first “Your Voice” survey this winter. The results provided valuable insight into what our members’ top policy issues are, such as standardized testing, educator compensation and benefits, and the Teacher Retirement System (TRS). Look for a blog post diving deeper into these issues on Teach the Vote next week.


On Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020, President Donald Trump announced from the Oval Office that nine federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Education (ED), would release new guidance regarding religious expression. In public schools specifically, the new guidance clarifies protections for students who want to pray or worship in school and eases access to federal funds for religious organizations that provide social services. The guidance also requires that, in order to receive federal funds under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, school districts must certify with their state agency that they do not have policies in place that would prevent students’ right to pray. Additionally, states must have a process in place to receive complaints against school districts regarding religious expression and must notify ED about such complaints.

Under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, students and teachers have a right to pray in public schools. However, while acting in their official capacities, teachers, administrators, and other school employees are not permitted to lead, encourage, or discourage students from participating in prayer. Read more about the new rules in this reporting by the Washington Post.


On Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020 three Texas voters, the League of Women Voters, and the Move Texas Civic Fund filed a federal lawsuit to challenge Texas’s lack of online voter registration when residents update or renew their driver’s licenses online. Under The federal motor voter law allows for voter registration when obtaining a driver’s license, but in Texas, the law is only carried out in face-to-face interactions. This is the second iteration of the case, which was originally dismissed by a federal court because the plaintiff had become re-registered to vote before a verdict was reached and lost standing to sue. Should the plaintiffs ultimately win this latest case, Texas would have to allow online voter registration through the driver’s license process. Read more about the new case in this reporting from the Texas Tribune.


As ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier reported earlier today on our blog, Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen (R-Angleton) has announced his appointment of Rep. Giovanni Capriglione to chair the powerful House Appropriations committee. Read more about the announcement here.


 

Texas election roundup: Finance reports coming in

Early voting for the March 3 Texas primary elections is just over a month away now, and special runoff elections in three House districts will have some voters heading to the polls even sooner. ATPE’s Governmental Relations team has been busy researching and meeting with candidates and updating our candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote. The profiles are a great way to find out how your legislators voted on education bills in recent sessions and to learn more about the candidates running for the Texas House or Senate or the State Board of Education (SBOE) this year. We’ll be uploading candidates’ survey responses on the website as we receive them throughout this election cycle. Make sure you’re aware of all the upcoming election-related dates and deadlines this year.

Candidates for various elected offices in Texas submitted their campaign finance reports this week, detailing their fundraising and campaign spending over the last half of 2019. This provides a bit of insight not only into how much financial strength each campaign has mustered, but who exactly is funding them.

In the special runoff election for House District (HD) 28 in Ft. Bend County outside Houston, Texas Parent-PAC endorsed candidate Eliz Markowitz, a Democrat, raised $244,000 and spent $240,000 between October 27 and December 31, ending the period with $118,000 cash on hand. Republican Gary Gates raised $25,000, spent $323,000, and ended with $60,000 in the bank. The winner of the Jan. 28 runoff will hold the HD 28 seat for the remainder of this year. The same is true in Dallas’s HD 100, where Democrats James Armstrong, III and Lorraine Birabil are in a runoff, and in Houston’s HD 148, where the two runoff candidates are Republican Luis LaRotta and Democrat Anna Eastman. All six of the candidates competing in this month’s runoff elections are also on the ballot for the 2020 primary elections in March, seeking to become their respective party’s nominee to vie for a full term in the office starting in 2021. Click the links on the candidates’ names above to find out more about them and others appearing on the 2020 ballot.

Leading Texas Forward, a PAC led by Karl Rove with the aim of maintaining the Republican majority in the Texas House, reported raising $505,000 from August through December. State Rep. Chris Turner (D-Dallas) reported raising $321,000 to help Democrats take control of the House. State Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) told The Quorum Report he’s transferring $350,000 to his One Texas PAC with the same goal.

In the Democratic presidential primary, Mike Bloomberg announced he has hired 37 organizers in Texas and plans to have 150 in place before the end of January, according to the Texas Tribune. Bloomberg is hoping to score a sizeable chunk of delegates from Texas in the March 3 primary. Elizabeth Warren meanwhile announced several Texas endorsements this week.

Here’s our weekly reminder that voting is the single most important thing you can do in order to lift up our public schools. ATPE and our partners in the Texas Educators Vote coalition are working to encourage a culture of voting that will ensure public education remains a top priority at the Texas Capitol. Here is a great video by Palmer ISD explaining the powerful impact that creating a culture of voting has made on public education in 2019. Check it out!

Texas election roundup: New GOP PAC in town

The big news in Texas politics this week is an announcement by a group of Republican members of the Texas House of Representatives that they have formed a new political action committee (PAC) to fill the void in fundraising created by Speaker Dennis Bonnen’s (R-Angleton) decision not to run for reelection.

Typically, the speaker coordinates fundraising efforts and doles out money to help endangered House incumbents who belong to the majority party. Democrats need just nine seats to win control of the Texas House, which places Republicans in a defensive position. Without Speaker Bonnen playing an active leadership role, Republicans are at a disadvantage. Enter Reps. Charlie Geren (R-Fort Worth), Drew Darby (R-San Angelo), Lyle Larson (R-San Antonio), Four Price (R-Amarillo), and Chris Paddie (R-Marshall), who filed paperwork this week to form Leading Texas Forward PAC. According to the Texas Tribune, the PAC aims to raise $5 million for GOP incumbents and lists none other than GOP strategist Karl Rove as its treasurer.

In other House news, Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee Chair Poncho Nevarez (D-Eagle Pass) announced late last week he would not run for reelection after admitting to a drug-related incident. Nevarez told the Texas Tribune he intends to seek treatment.

Gov. Greg Abbott announced the special runoff elections for House District (HD) 28, HD 100, and HD 148 will be held Jan. 28, 2020. The latter two seats are expected to remain under Democratic control, while HD 28 represents a hotly-contested race over a seat most recently occupied by a Republican.

A new University of Texas-Tyler poll shows President Donald Trump’s approval rating among Texans at 43 percent, compared to 49 percent on respondents who disapprove and 8 percent who have not made up their minds. That poll shows former Vice President Joe Biden leading the pack among Texans’ favored Democratic nominees, followed by Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. A separate Politico analysis predicts Trump will win Texas, but lists a number of contested Republican Congressional seats as likely Democratic pickups.

Voting is the most powerful thing you can do as an educator, and ATPE thanks those of you who voted in the Nov. 5 election. Voting in the upcoming 2020 elections will be critical in order to ensure legislators provide schools and teachers with the resources they need to help students grow and achieve. Visit the website for our Texas Educators Vote coalition today and sign up to receive text updates so that you never miss an important election!

Texas election roundup: More Senate shakeups

Big election news continues to come out of the Texas Senate, where state Sen. Jose Rodriguez (D-El Paso) announced last week that he will not seek reelection, and state Rep. Cesar Blanco (D-El Paso) followed with an announcement that he will seek Rodriguez’s open seat next year.

Sen. Rodriguez has been one of the most consistent champions of public education in the Texas Senate, and his Senate District (SD) 29 is securely in Democratic hands. Beto O’Rourke carried SD 29 by nearly 49 percentage points in 2018, and Rodriguez has not faced serious opposition in recent years. Rep. Blanco chairs the House Democratic Campaign Committee, which works to elect Democrats to the Texas House, and announced he has already secured the endorsements of fellow state Reps. Art Fierro (D-El Paso), Mary Gonzalez (D-Clint), Joe Moody (D-El Paso), and Poncho Nevarez (D-Eagle Pass), as well as U.S. Rep. Veronica Escobar (D-TX 16).

Other state representatives continue to announce plans to return to office. State Reps. Will Metcalf (R-Conroe), Brad Buckley (R-Salado), and Hugh Shine (R-Temple) all announced plans to run for reelection.

In the race for U.S. Senate, former U.S. Congressman and 2006 Democratic nominee for governor Chris Bell formally entered the race against incumbent Republican U.S. Senator John Cornyn. Bell is one of nine candidates vying for the Democratic nomination in the U.S. Senate race, including state Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) and former congressional candidate and U.S. Air Force veteran MJ Hegar.

Tuesday, September 24, is National Voter Registration Day. The goal of this national, non-partisan event is to increase civic participation by registering hundreds of thousands of voters on Tuesday. It was launched in 2012 and has grown in popularity ever since, thanks to the help of non-partisan organizations such as the League of Women voters and the Texas Educators Vote coalition, of which ATPE is a member. Read this post by our friends at Texas Educators Vote to find out how you can participate.

Texas election roundup: Another big retirement

The big news so far this week has been U.S. Rep. Bill Flores (R-TX 17) announcing his retirement and intention not to run for reelection in 2020. Flores defeated longtime Waco Democrat Rep. Chet Edwards in the Republican wave election of 2010. Flores won reelection in 2018 by nearly 16 percentage points, and U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz beat Democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke by just over nine points in the district.

The field of candidates in three special elections scheduled for Nov. 5 has been set. After the close of the filing deadline, a total of 26 candidates had declared campaigns to succeed state Reps. John Zerwas (R-Richmond), Jessica Farrar (D-Houston), and Eric Johnson (D-Dallas). The most competitive race will be for the seat being vacated by Rep. Zerwas in House District (HD) 28, which both Zerwas and Cruz won by single-digit margins in 2018. One Democrat and six Republicans have filed for the seat. The full list of candidates in this fall’s special elections can be found in this post by the Texas Tribune.

The 2020 elections pose a major test of the resolve of educators to hold their elected representatives to account for legislation passed and legislation promised. Things like school funding and educator pay will almost certainly be on the chopping block when the Texas Legislature returns in 2021, which makes your votes all the more important. If you are not yet registered to vote in Texas, the deadline to do so in time for this November’s elections is October 7. If you’re not yet registered or unsure what to do, just follow this link to the Texas Educators Vote coalition website.