Tag Archives: accreditation

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Jan. 31, 2020

As January ends, we hope you are registered to vote ahead of Super Tuesday on March 3! In the meantime, here’s this week’s education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


ELECTION UPDATE: Special elections in three Texas House districts concluded on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. The victors were Gary Gates (R) with 58.05% of the vote in House District (HD) 28, Lorraine Birabil (D) with 66.28% of the vote in HD 100, and Anna Eastman (D) with 65.47% of the vote in HD 148. Read more on the results in this election night blog post by ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell.

Early voting for the primary starts in just under three weeks on February 18, 2020, which is also Educator Voting Day. Primary election day follows two weeks later on March 3, 2020. Remember that the deadline to register to vote in the Texas primaries is Monday, Feb. 3. Verify your voter registration status here.

As the primaries get closer, here are helpful resources for educators and the general public:

  • Learn more about candidates running in 2020 for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education by checking out their profiles here on Teach the Vote, which include answers to the ATPE Candidate Survey (where available) and legislators’ voting records.
  • Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com for election resources, advice, and voting reminders.
  • The Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation is hosting “For the Future” education-oriented candidate forums around the state. Click here for details.

This week ATPE submitted public comments on three proposed changes to administrative rules that would affect public schools, educators, and students.

First, ATPE formally commented on proposed changes to commissioner’s rules that regulate school district-charter partnerships. Senate Bill 1882 of 2017 enabled school districts to partner with charter entities to operate some of their campuses, and newly proposed rules have raised some concerns for ATPE and other education stakeholders. Read our comments here.

Next, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is proposing changes to its certification rules that could benefit high school students interested in pursuing careers in the classroom. ATPE and the Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE) submitted joint recommendations this week for the criteria associated with the educational aide certificate. Those interested in submitting input on this rule proposal can find more information here. The deadline for public comments is Feb. 3, 2020.

Finally, ATPE also shared ouir concerns with SBEC about rules relating to master teacher certificates that are slated to be eliminated as a result of last year’s House Bill 3. Those wishing to submit public comments on this rule review can find more information here. The deadline is Feb. 3.

As you can see, our advocacy for public education doesn’t stop when the legislative session ends. During the interim, it is important to stay engaged with the work of state boards and agencies implementing education laws and legislative committees as they study interim charges. Learn more about interim advocacy in this new blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.


Image sourced from THGC.

This week, Texans observed Holocaust Remembrance Week as designated by Gov. Greg Abbott after the 86th Legislature passed Senate Bill (SB) 1828 by Sen. José Menéndez in 2019. The Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission (THGC) recommended the observance this week so as to include International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27, which when Auschwitz was liberated. Also this week, in Washington, DC, the U.S. House passed H.R. 943, referred to as the “Never Again Education Act” to provide grants and resources for Holocaust education programs. Find more information and related links in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


The State Board of Education (SBOE) met today, Jan. 31, 2020, to conclude its week-long January meeting. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins attended the meeting and provided this update.

Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence), who chairs the Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund (PSF), updated members on the status of the fund. He reported that the PSF’s investments total $46.5 billion, and the fund is being utilized as collateral to guarantee $87 billion in bonds out of a $117 billion bond guarantee capacity. Of the bonds backed by the PSF, $85 billion of those are bonds for independent school districts, and $2 billion are bonds for charter schools.

The SBOE manages a portion of the PSF, while the School Land Board (SLB) under the General Land Office (GLO) manages the other portion. Legislation passed during the 2019 legislative session to address a dispute over PSF management expanded the SLB from three members to five, two of whom would be recommended by the SBOE. Those two members have now been seated on the SLB, and the SBOE is working on setting up a joint meeting in April.

The board spent much of the morning Friday discussing board training requirements for local school district trustees, and ultimately decided to maintain the current rules unchanged. Members also voted to give preliminary approval to curriculum standards for a new course on African-American studies, which would make Texas the fifth state in the nation to offer such a course, according to TEA officials.

Earlier in the week, ATPE’s Wiggins reported on one of the board committee’s discussion about the application process for charter schools and on Education Commissioner Mike Morath’s presentation to the full board on Tuesday with an annual update from the Texas Education Agency.


Today, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) released the 2019-20 accreditation statuses for Texas public school districts and open-enrollment charter schools. Accreditation statuses encapsulate a wide variety of factors, such as financial and academic accountability and compliance with reporting requirements. Districts and charters that are assigned anything other than an accredited status must notify parents and property owners in the district. Find your district’s status here.


 

Summary of SBEC’s meeting on July 26, 2019

On Friday, July 26, 2019, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met in Austin to take up a lengthy agenda that included approving rules to implement the EdTPA pilot program and discussing implementation of bills passed by the 86th Legislature, such as House Bill (HB) 3.

First, a note about SBEC procedure. Each agenda item that makes changes to rules takes three board meetings to move through SBEC. The board first brings up an item for discussion only, then formally proposes the rule at its next meeting and allows for a public comment period, and then finally adopts the rule at the third meeting. Additionally, under state law all adopted SBEC rules are subject to review by the elected State Board of Education (SBOE), which can take no action or veto a rule.

On Friday, SBEC approved two standard four-year rule reviews. The review of Title 19 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 233, which establishes the certificate classes for classroom teachers (e.g. 4-8 Science, Music EC-12, etc.), and the review of 19 TAC Chapter 244, which outlines the qualifications, training, and acceptable criteria for educator appraisers, were approved.

The board also adopted items that will now make their way to SBOE, including revisions to the criteria that school districts use to assign teachers. The assignment rules are based on the certificates held by teachers, which sometimes change, and the rules must also reflect the addition of new courses, such as Ethnic Studies. For instance, someone with an 8-12 History certification could be assigned to teach a high school Ethnic Studies classroom. Also headed to the SBOE are revisions to the program requirements for educator preparation programs (EPPs) that would create an optional, intensive pre-service preparation and certification pathway; provide guidance for EPP name changes after a change in ownership; and require educators seeking certification in two areas to have clinical teaching experience in both. Lastly, the board adopted revisions to certification and testing requirements including the incorporation of the new intensive pre-service option; including the portfolio assessment EdTPA as a testing option; and updating the fees to include EdTPA and the subject-matter-only assessments used for the Pre-Admission Content Test (PACT) route (discussed below). Interestingly, the board adopted an amendment proposed by board member Tommy Coleman to clarify in the rule language that the EdTPA assessment option is strictly a pilot.

Board members next took up agenda items for proposal of new rules and the authorization of a public comment period on those. One set of proposed rules includes changes to the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP), which will provide for new commendations for high-performing EPPs; adopt the EPP accountability manual into rule; clarify how EPPs are accredited; allow SBEC to require an EPP to complete an action plan as a sanction for low performance; and make additional technical changes. Additionally, the Board proposed revisions to EPP admission requirements to implement Senate Bill (SB) 1839, HB 2039, HB 3349 that were passed by the 85th Legislature in 2017. The rule changes would add admission requirements for the Early Childhood through Grade 3 (EC-3) and Grades 6-12 Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificates created by those bills. The revisions would also allow candidates to take subject-matter-only assessments for their PACT if they don’t have the commensurate coursework and minimum 2.5 GPA that is required to enter an EPP. Currently, candidates can gain admission through a content pedagogy test, which tests for teaching strategies that the candidate hasn’t been exposed to yet. These items will be eligible for public comment from August 23 to September 23, 2019, and published in the Texas Register.

Since the 86th Legislature just ended its session in May, SBEC must act quickly to approve changes in order to meet the implementation date of several bills that were passed this year. Therefore, a couple items on the board’s agenda went straight to the proposal stage, skipping the initial discussion phase in order to save time. These include rule changes to implement the following bills:

  • SB 1200 by Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels), which allows for military spouses licensed in other states to teach in Texas.
  • HB 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), which repeals the master teacher certificates as of September 1, 2019. Any candidate wishing to gain or renew a master teacher certificate must do so by August 30, 2019. Any current certificates will remain valid up until their expiration date. Please see the Texas Education Agency’s information on master teacher certificates here for more detail.

The Board also took action on two non-rule “board items,” which were discussed at the previous meeting and are effective immediately upon approval. One of these was to approve the ability of the Region 13 Education Service Center (ESC) to offer a Reading Specialist Certification, which is a different class of certification from the master teacher certification. The other item was to name members who will serve on an advisory committee for the newly proposed special education certifications. These certifications would improve upon the current, broad special education certificate by creating a deaf/blind supplemental certificate and multiple new certificates that are more specialized by grade level and the degree of support needed by students.

The following items had been up for discussion at Friday’s SBEC meeting but were moved instead to the board’s October meeting agenda:

  • Proposed changes to educator disciplinary proceedings, sanctions, and contested cases to implement the provisions of HB 3, SB 1230, SB 1476, and SB 37 as passed by the 86th Legislature. Collectively, these bills will impact reporting requirements for superintendents, principals, and directors of public and private schools regarding educator misconduct; create a do-not-hire registry; and remove student loan default as a ground for discipline by SBEC. The anticipated rule changes would also permit SBEC to deny certificates to educators who have abandoned their contract within the past 12 months. This will cover intern and probationary certificates, which SBEC loses jurisdiction over once these 12-month certificates expire.
  • A board item meant to allow the Board to discuss the EPP continuing approval process, which includes procedures for review and update of EPP standards and requirements.
  • A board item to discuss the upcoming educator certification test development updates to current content pedagogy tests. The Principal as Instructional Leader assessment was one of the updated tests and is set to become operational on July 29, 2019. Other new tests will roll out into 2021 and beyond.

The last agenda item, a legislative update, was skipped at Friday’s meeting because members agreed that it had been adequately covered in a July 25th SBEC work group session. Bills impacting SBEC rulemaking as passed by the 86th Legislature include HB 3, HB 18, HB 403, HB 2424, SB 37, SB 241, SB 1200, SB 1230, and SB 1476. All of these except for HB 3’s Science of Teaching Reading certification requirements are now set to be discussed at the October 4, 2019 SBEC meeting. See a detailed table of SBEC’s proposed timeline for implementing provisions of each of these bills here. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for future updates.