Category Archives: voting

Texas election roundup: Early voting in special runoffs

Early voting is underway this week in the special runoff elections in Dallas, Houston, and Fort Bend County. The special runoff in House District (HD) 28 in Fort Bend County has drawn national attention as Texas Democrats seek to capture a seat previously held by Republican state Rep. John Zerwas.

Republicans hold a nine-seat majority in the Texas House of Representatives, and Democrats are anxious to flip as many seats as possible in order to wrest control of the lower chamber heading into the 2021 legislative session. Democratic candidate Eliz Markowitz, who was endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC, was joined on the campaign trail this week by former presidential candidates Julian Castro and Beto O’Rourke. Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren also announced her support for Markowitz this week.

On the Republican side, the Quorum Report reported the Texas GOP is busing block walkers from all over Texas into Fort Bend to aid Republican candidate Gary Gates. The Gates campaign claimed their internal polling this week showed Gates up 13 percentage points over Markowitz. According to campaign reporter Jeff Blaylock, while Republican political consultant Derek Ryan’s analysis of the first two days of early voting show that only 46% of HD28 voters have recent Republican primary voting history but no Democratic primary history. Mail ballots in the HD 28 special runoff election have already surpassed the number submitted in the 2018 general election.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, 16.1 million Texans are now registered to vote. Voting is the single most important way to exercise your political voice, and early voting in primaries across the state begins in just a few weeks! The deadline to register to vote for the March 3 primary is February 3. Visit our friends at TexasEducatorsVote.com to find out how to register to vote and to access voter resources, including text reminders when an important vote is coming up.

Texas election roundup: Finance reports coming in

Early voting for the March 3 Texas primary elections is just over a month away now, and special runoff elections in three House districts will have some voters heading to the polls even sooner. ATPE’s Governmental Relations team has been busy researching and meeting with candidates and updating our candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote. The profiles are a great way to find out how your legislators voted on education bills in recent sessions and to learn more about the candidates running for the Texas House or Senate or the State Board of Education (SBOE) this year. We’ll be uploading candidates’ survey responses on the website as we receive them throughout this election cycle. Make sure you’re aware of all the upcoming election-related dates and deadlines this year.

Candidates for various elected offices in Texas submitted their campaign finance reports this week, detailing their fundraising and campaign spending over the last half of 2019. This provides a bit of insight not only into how much financial strength each campaign has mustered, but who exactly is funding them.

In the special runoff election for House District (HD) 28 in Ft. Bend County outside Houston, Texas Parent-PAC endorsed candidate Eliz Markowitz, a Democrat, raised $244,000 and spent $240,000 between October 27 and December 31, ending the period with $118,000 cash on hand. Republican Gary Gates raised $25,000, spent $323,000, and ended with $60,000 in the bank. The winner of the Jan. 28 runoff will hold the HD 28 seat for the remainder of this year. The same is true in Dallas’s HD 100, where Democrats James Armstrong, III and Lorraine Birabil are in a runoff, and in Houston’s HD 148, where the two runoff candidates are Republican Luis LaRotta and Democrat Anna Eastman. All six of the candidates competing in this month’s runoff elections are also on the ballot for the 2020 primary elections in March, seeking to become their respective party’s nominee to vie for a full term in the office starting in 2021. Click the links on the candidates’ names above to find out more about them and others appearing on the 2020 ballot.

Leading Texas Forward, a PAC led by Karl Rove with the aim of maintaining the Republican majority in the Texas House, reported raising $505,000 from August through December. State Rep. Chris Turner (D-Dallas) reported raising $321,000 to help Democrats take control of the House. State Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio) told The Quorum Report he’s transferring $350,000 to his One Texas PAC with the same goal.

In the Democratic presidential primary, Mike Bloomberg announced he has hired 37 organizers in Texas and plans to have 150 in place before the end of January, according to the Texas Tribune. Bloomberg is hoping to score a sizeable chunk of delegates from Texas in the March 3 primary. Elizabeth Warren meanwhile announced several Texas endorsements this week.

Here’s our weekly reminder that voting is the single most important thing you can do in order to lift up our public schools. ATPE and our partners in the Texas Educators Vote coalition are working to encourage a culture of voting that will ensure public education remains a top priority at the Texas Capitol. Here is a great video by Palmer ISD explaining the powerful impact that creating a culture of voting has made on public education in 2019. Check it out!

Texas election roundup: New year edition

Welcome back from the holidays! While you’re hopefully easing into the spring semester, the Super Tuesday primaries — including the Texas primary — are less than two months away. That means election season is in full swing.

The new year began with Texas once again making news in the 2020 presidential primary. The last Texan in the race, former San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro suspended his campaign for the Democratic nomination last week and promptly endorsed U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) for the job. Castro is now actively campaigning for Warren.

Another high profile endorsement came to the House District 28 special runoff election, early voting for which begins January 21. Vice-president Joe Biden endorsed Democrat Eliz Markowitz, who has also been endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC. Both Markowitz and her Republican opponent Gary Gates have released new video ads to begin the new year.

Speaking of Biden, a number of former Castro supporters have thrown their support behind the former veep now that Castro has left the race. State Reps. Rafael Anchia (D-Dallas), Ryan Guillen (D-Rio Grande City), Eddie Lucio III (D-Brownsville), Oscar Longoria (D-La Joya), and Mando Martinez (D-Weslaco) have all switched their support to Biden.

Elections are determined by who shows up! Now is a good time to visit our friends at the Texas Educators Vote coalition if you haven’t yet. Their website includes handy voting resources, including text reminders for important voting events and a link to the Educator’s Oath to Vote.

Texas election roundup: Endorsement news and more

Now that the filing deadline has passed, candidates are turning to the business of campaigning in earnest. This often begins with racking up endorsements from influential people or organizations in order to signal the strength of their candidacy.

A significant endorsement this week comes from the national Democratic Senate Campaign Committee, which endorsed M.J. Hegar in the crowded Democratic primary for U.S. Senate here in Texas. Hegar’s primary opponents include state Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) and former gubernatorial candidate and U.S. Rep. Chris Bell, among others. The winner will face Republican U.S. Sen. John Cornyn in the general election.

Elsewhere, Houston mayor Sylvester Turner won reelection to another four-year term as leader of the state’s largest city. Turner previously served as vice-chair of the House Appropriations Committee as a member of the Texas Legislature.

At this point, it appears much of the action in the 2020 primaries will be on the Democratic side of the ticket. In addition to the presidential primary, more than twice as many Democratic state legislators face primary opponents than Republicans this time around. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for more information on specific candidates running in your neighborhood coming soon!

As we wrap up the 2019 calendar year, we in the ATPE Governmental Relations Department and our partners in the Texas Educators Vote coalition would like to thank you for your hard work advocating for your profession this year. The 2019 legislative session was a major turnaround from previous sessions, and it was entirely because Texas educators showed up at the polls in 2018 and elected pro-public education candidates. We will need to do the same thing in 2020 to improve upon our gains and keep from losing the incredible progress we’ve made. Congratulations on a successful year, and here’s to an even better 2020!

Texas election roundup: The field is set

Monday marked the deadline for candidates to file for a place on the ballot in 2020. We should technically know at this point who will be on the ballot for the March party primaries, however information from some counties has been somewhat slow to surface. As information trickles in, we should have a pretty clear idea of who is running by the end of the week.

What we know so far is that at least nine Republicans in the Texas House of Representatives will face primary opponents, as well as 17 House Democrats. State Sens. Eddie Lucio (D-Brownsville) and Borris Miles (D-Houston) also face primary challengers. Stay tuned to TeachTheVote.org as we begin to roll out candidate information ahead of the upcoming March 3 primaries.

State Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington) announced Tuesday he will not seek reelection in 2020, citing health issues. This has resulted in the filing period period for House District (HD) 96 reopening until Dec. 16. Zedler won reelection in HD 96 by 3.6 percentage points in 2018, and U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz narrowly defeated former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke by just 0.2 percentage points in the district.

It was also reported this week that state Rep. Mike Lang (R-Granbury) filed for the position of Hood County commissioner, which means he will not stand for reelection to the Texas House after all. The filing period for candidates in HD 60 will also reopen for one week as a result.

As we enter the thick of the holiday season, our partners at the Texas Educators Vote coalition urge you to give the gift of voting. In addition to being the single most impactful way to exercise your voice, did you know that studies show voting is good for your health? You can give the gift of voting this holiday season by taking a few minutes to make sure your friends and family are registered to vote. If they’re not, visit TexasEducatorsVote.com for handy information about how to register.

Texas election roundup: Filing deadline approaching

Monday, Dec. 9, marks the last day candidates can file to be on the ballot for the Texas elections to be held in 2020. That means after next Monday, we’ll know who will be on the ballot for the March primaries and who won’t.

Another incumbent has announced he will not be seeking reelection in 2020. State Rep. Rick Miller (R-Sugar Land) quickly ended his reelection bid after making comments about the ethnicity of his primary opponents, two of whom are of Asian descent. The controversial comments prompted a rebuke by the Fort Bend County Republican Party and caused Gov. Abbott to withdraw his endorsement of Miller.

In the U.S. presidential race, U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) ended her bid for the Democratic nomination earlier this week. That leaves former Vice President Joe Biden, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Tom Steyer, Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT), and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) as the six candidates who have qualified to appear in the next debate, to be held December 19 in Los Angeles. The deadline for other candidates to qualify for the debate is December 12.

Meanwhile, our partners at the Texas Educators Vote coalition have put together a handy calendar of the elections coming up in 2020. Here are some important dates:

January 28, 2020
Special Runoff Elections for House of Representatives Districts 28, 100, 148

February 3, 2020
Last day to register to vote in the March 3, 2020 Primary Elections

February 18-28, 2020
Early voting for the March 3, 2020 Primary Elections

March 3, 2020
Texas Primary Elections

April 2, 2020
Last day to register to vote in the May 2 local elections

April 20-28, 2020
Early voting for May 2 local elections

April 27, 2020
Last day to register to vote in the 2020 Primary Runoff Election

May 2, 2020
Uniform Election Date (Local political subdivisions)

May 18-22, 2020
Early voting for 2020 Primary Runoff Elections

May 26, 2020
Primary Runoff Elections

October 5, 2020
Last day to register to vote in the 2020 General Election

October 19-30, 2020
Early voting for the 2020 General Election

November 3, 2020
2020 General Election

Texas election roundup: New GOP PAC in town

The big news in Texas politics this week is an announcement by a group of Republican members of the Texas House of Representatives that they have formed a new political action committee (PAC) to fill the void in fundraising created by Speaker Dennis Bonnen’s (R-Angleton) decision not to run for reelection.

Typically, the speaker coordinates fundraising efforts and doles out money to help endangered House incumbents who belong to the majority party. Democrats need just nine seats to win control of the Texas House, which places Republicans in a defensive position. Without Speaker Bonnen playing an active leadership role, Republicans are at a disadvantage. Enter Reps. Charlie Geren (R-Fort Worth), Drew Darby (R-San Angelo), Lyle Larson (R-San Antonio), Four Price (R-Amarillo), and Chris Paddie (R-Marshall), who filed paperwork this week to form Leading Texas Forward PAC. According to the Texas Tribune, the PAC aims to raise $5 million for GOP incumbents and lists none other than GOP strategist Karl Rove as its treasurer.

In other House news, Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee Chair Poncho Nevarez (D-Eagle Pass) announced late last week he would not run for reelection after admitting to a drug-related incident. Nevarez told the Texas Tribune he intends to seek treatment.

Gov. Greg Abbott announced the special runoff elections for House District (HD) 28, HD 100, and HD 148 will be held Jan. 28, 2020. The latter two seats are expected to remain under Democratic control, while HD 28 represents a hotly-contested race over a seat most recently occupied by a Republican.

A new University of Texas-Tyler poll shows President Donald Trump’s approval rating among Texans at 43 percent, compared to 49 percent on respondents who disapprove and 8 percent who have not made up their minds. That poll shows former Vice President Joe Biden leading the pack among Texans’ favored Democratic nominees, followed by Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. A separate Politico analysis predicts Trump will win Texas, but lists a number of contested Republican Congressional seats as likely Democratic pickups.

Voting is the most powerful thing you can do as an educator, and ATPE thanks those of you who voted in the Nov. 5 election. Voting in the upcoming 2020 elections will be critical in order to ensure legislators provide schools and teachers with the resources they need to help students grow and achieve. Visit the website for our Texas Educators Vote coalition today and sign up to receive text updates so that you never miss an important election!

Texas election roundup: Voter turnout shows improvement

Initial turnout figures for this month’s constitutional amendment election show small but significant improvement in the number of folks who did their civic duty by voting. According to our colleagues at the Texas Educators Vote coalition, about 8.5 percent of eligible Texas voters typically cast votes in constitutional elections. Roughly 12 percent of registered voters participated in the recent constitutional election on Nov. 5, 2019. That’s still an incredibly small number, but it represents progress. You can read more analysis of the election in this Texas Tribune article that was recently republished on Teach the Vote.

This past Saturday, Nov. 8, 2019, marked the first day that candidates can formally file paperwork to run for state offices in the 2020 election cycle. This includes seats in the Texas House of Representatives and Texas Senate. The filing period ends Dec. 9, after which time we will know who will be on the primary ballots in March. We expect to see a steady stream of filing announcements between now and then.

Election results are determined by who shows up to participate. The Texas primary election is March 3, 2020, and early voting begins in February. The Texas Educators Vote coalition has a list of activities that you can do as a teacher, administrator, parent, or school board member to help drive more participation in these critical elections. Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com to get involved and sign up for key voter updates.

Texas election roundup: Presidential field narrows

Texas wasn’t the only state that held elections this Tuesday, and political observers across the country have spent the week analyzing the results of the 2019 races in places like Kentucky, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. In Kentucky, the winner of that state’s gubernatorial election used his victory speech Tuesday night as an opportunity to credit educators with turning out to vote and making the difference in that race.

The big national news came over the weekend, as former Congressman and U.S. Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke of Texas announced he was ending his campaign for president. Following the announcement, Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey noted that O’Rourke nonetheless deserves credit among Democrats for putting Texas in a competitive position. O’Rourke’s exit leaves former San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro as the only Texan remaining in the Democratic presidential primary. Several O’Rourke loyalists have already transferred their support to Castro, who is also struggling to gain traction against higher profile candidates in the Democratic field.

Back in Texas, the state’s three special elections to fill unexpired terms in the Texas House of Representatives will head to runoffs. The winner of those runoffs will face a quick turnaround to defend their seats and win reelection to a full term in 2020. You can read the full results of Tuesday’s state elections here. Additionally, read more voter turnout in Tuesday’s election in this post from the Texas Tribune republished on our blog.

Turning our attention ahead to the 2020 elections, Rep. Roland Gutierrez (D-San Antonio) announced Saturday he will run against Sen. Pete Flores (R-Pleasanton) next year in Senate District (SD) 19. The district voted for both Clinton and O’Rourke by double digits. Flores won the seat in a special runoff election against former U.S. Rep. Pete Gallego in late summer 2018. Gallego edged out Gutierrez in the first round of the special election.

A University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll released this week shows Democrats hoping to unseat U.S. Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) are largely unknown to Democratic primary voters. Of the nine Democrats, former U.S. Rep. Chris Bell is the best known. Air Force veteran M.J. Hegar, who ran unsuccessfully against U.S. Rep. John Carter in 2018, is the most favored among primary voters. Twelve percent of Democratic primary voters said they’d support Hegar. State Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) came in third, with five percent support.

As always, you can visit the website of our Texas Educators Vote coalition here to sign up for voting reminders to make sure that you never miss an important election. Next up will be the special runoff elections in Houston and Dallas, followed by a critical round of March primaries. Stay tuned!

From The Texas Tribune: Half of registered Texas voters turned out in 2018. Just 12% turned out this year.

This year, 12% of registered voters cast ballots, compared with 6% of the state’s 15 million registered voters who voted in 2017. Photo by Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

Half of registered Texas voters turned out in 2018. Just 12% turned out this year.” was first published by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Texas voters approved nine amendments to the state’s Constitution on Tuesday. Only 12% of registered voters actually cast ballots — a higher percentage from the 2017 election, but still overwhelmingly low overall.

A majority of Texas voters must approve any changes to the Texas Constitution. Getting a proposed amendment on the ballot requires support from more than two-thirds of both chambers of the Legislature.

Voters in some communities also weighed in on important local issues. For example, Houston voters weighed in on a contentious mayoral race, while Travis County voters approved a proposition authorizing 2% of the hotel occupancy tax to go toward renovating the Travis County Exposition Center.

Turnout is — and has always been — historically low in elections that take place during odd-numbered years. Here’s what it looked like this year.

How easy is it to amend the Texas Constitution?

It’s fairly simple.

That simplicity, in part, is because few people vote in constitutional amendment elections. This year, 12% of registered voters cast ballots, compared with 6% of the state’s 15 million registered voters who voted in 2017. By comparison, 59% of eligible voters cast a ballot in the latest presidential election.

Unsurprisingly, turnout relies heavily on what’s on the ballot. Turnout in 2015 was higher than normal in part because of a Houston mayor’s race and a state ballot proposition dealing with property taxes. In 2005, nearly 18% of registered voters cast ballots. That year, voters overwhelmingly approved writing a ban on same-sex marriage into the state’s Constitution. Twelve percent of registered voters voted in 2003, when a controversial amendment limiting lawsuit damages was on the ballot.

Do people vote on the whole ballot?

For the most part, yes. But they don’t have to.

Proposition 4, which would make it harder to enact a state income tax, received the most votes by a hair — roughly 1.97 million Texans who cast ballots weighed in on this change to the Constitution.

The closest race on the ballot was Proposition 9, which would allow the Legislature to create a property tax exemption for precious metals in state depositories like the Texas Bullion Depository. Proposition 9 also had the lowest turnout, with only 1.89 million Texans casting ballots — 79,057 fewer votes cast than there were on Proposition 4.

In 2005, more than 2.2 million people voted on the proposition concerning same-sex couples. The proposition with the fewest number of votes — an item focused on clearing land titles in Upshur and Smith counties — had only 1.9 million votes.

Turnout is hard to chart during constitutional amendment elections because of how the Texas secretary of state compiles data. A spokesman with the agency said voter turnout data is compiled based on a designated turnout race, even if it’s not the race with the most votes. This year, the designated race is Proposition 1.

Why was Proposition 4 so popular?

The proposition, authored by state Rep. Jeff Leach, R-Plano, and state Sen. Pat Fallon, R-Prosper, drew considerable attention in the lead-up to Election Day.

Supporters of the amendment said they wanted to provide assurance to residents and outsiders interested in doing business in Texas that the state is committed to a business-friendly environment; those in opposition argued the measure could tie the hands of future generations as they look to fund areas like education and health care.

Several left-leaning groups, including the Center for Public Policy Priorities, rallied against the proposal. CPPP says it launched digital ads in “targeted areas of the state” and sent a mail piece to tens of thousands of households.

Which counties had higher turnout than others?

Among the 10 counties with the most registered voters, Harris, Fort Bend and Travis counties had the highest turnout. Harris County had a 15.69% turnout this year, compared with 6.46% in 2017. Fort Bend County had a 14.69% turnout, compared with 6.6% in 2017.

One of the reasons for Harris County’s higher turnout is because its county seat, Houston, is the only major Texas city that holds its mayoral race in November. (Dallas and San Antonio held their elections in May.)

This year’s Houston race drew considerable attention as first-term Mayor Sylvester Turner sought to fend off several challengers, including high-wattage trial attorney Tony Buzbee, who self-funded his campaign to the tune of $10 million. It’s also the first mayoral race to take place since Hurricane Harvey ravaged the Texas coast. Turner received 47% of the vote, compared with Buzbee’s 28%, sending the two to a runoff election slated for next month.

In addition to the rollicking mayoral race, Houston-area voters living in two state House districts had high-profile special elections on the ballot.

After the resignations of state Reps. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, and Jessica Farrar D-Houston, some voters in the Houston-area districts voted for their next state representatives. (Only Houston-area voters living in District 28 and District 148 cast ballots in these two races.)

Farrar’s seat is solidly blue; Zerwas’ seat, meanwhile, was a target for Democrats well before he announced he was resigning and joining the University of Texas System. Eliz Markowitz is the sole Democratic candidate in the race. Six GOP candidates have also lined up for the seat.

In Farrar’s former district, Democrat Anna Eastman and Republican Luis La Rotta are headed to the next round; in Zerwas’ former district, Markowitz and Republican Gary Gates will go to a runoff.

Carla Astudillo contributed to this story.

Disclosure: The Center for Public Policy Priorities, Tony Buzbee and the University of Texas System have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here.

This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2019/11/06/texas-2019-election-voter-turnout/.

 

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The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.