Category Archives: voter registration

Happy National Voter Registration Day!

September 22 is National Voter Registration Day across the United States. Are you registered to vote? When’s the last time you checked your voter registration status? Looking for voter resources? We’ve got you covered! 

First, the November 3 election is right around the corner. Don’t let it sneak up on you. Texans, be sure to mark these important dates in your calendars:

  • September 22 (today!): National Voter Registration Day
  • October 5: Deadline to register to vote
  • October 13: First day of early voting
  • October 19: Educator Voting Day
  • October 23: Last day that a vote-by-mail application can be received (not postmarked)
  • October 30: Last day of early voting
  • November 3: Election Day! Mail-in ballots also must be received by this date.

Visit votetexas.gov to check your voter registration status, download a ballot-by-mail application, find your polling location, and more. Do you have questions about voting by mail? Check out the “So, You’re Thinking about Voting by Mail” article on our Teach the Vote advocacy blog.

Below are a few more resources for Texas voters:

  • Have your students participate in Democracy Powered by You(th). Whether your students are eligible to vote or not, they can still lend their voice to the upcoming election and make a difference. Check out the first-ever Democracy Powered by You(th) voter registration competition, a multi-organization effort to build a coalition of youth voters.
  • Read our advocacy blog. For in-depth coverage of the upcoming election, including updates on key races and issues, read our advocacy blog at teachthevote.org/news.
  • Know your candidates. Information is power! Check teachthevote.org/races to learn more about the candidates and see how your state legislators voted on education issues.
  • Follow us on Twitter. For breaking news and advocacy insights, keep up with our lobby team on Twitter @TeachTheVote.
  • Check out TexasEducatorsVote.comThis website from our nonpartisan, educator-focused coalition offers a plethora of additional resources on participating in elections.
  • Prepare your ballot ahead of time. Use vote411.org to make a sample ballot to print out and take with you to the polls.

Don’t forget to share these dates and resources with your colleagues and friends. Only by coming together and acting as one voice can we truly advocate for public education! Make a plan, and vote for your public schools, your students, and your profession.

Texas election roundup: More court rulings

A pair of court decisions this week could make a significant impact on the November elections.

On Tuesday, the Texas Supreme Court ruled that three Green Party candidates must be restored to the November ballot, despite a lower court’s order to remove them because they had not paid the required filing fees. The conventional wisdom is that Green Party candidates tend to attract some voters who may have otherwise voted for a Democrat, and their presence in a close race could tip the balance toward the Republican candidate. The Texas Democratic Party filed the original complaint to remove the candidates, while the Republican justices on the Texas Supreme Court overturned the decision.

Another Texas Supreme Court decision announced Tuesday blocked Harris County from sending mail-in ballot applications to all registered voters in the county. As previously reported here at Teach the Vote, ballot applications are not the same as ballots themselves. In the Harry County case, voters would still have to make the determination of whether they are eligible to apply to vote by mail, then fill out and return the application in order to receive an actual ballot in the mail. If think you may be eligible and are considering voting by mail, check out this post by Teach the Vote that explains the process in detail.

These decisions underscore the importance of every single vote in this election. These decisions are likely to impact a relatively small number of votes, but the reason they are the subject of litigation in the first place is an acknowledgement of just how close the November elections could be.

Now onto lighter topics!

If you watched ABC this week, you may have caught the network special VOMO: Vote or Miss Out. The comedy special hosted by Kevin Hart featured guest appearances by Tiffany Hadish, Michelle Obama, Tim Allen, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and other celebrities urging Americans to vote. If you need a little comedic motivation, you can watch the full special here or watch clips on YouTube.

The Texas Tribune reported this week that new voter registrations in Texas have plummeted during the COVID-19 pandemic. The deadline to register to vote in the November 3 election is less than three weeks away. Voters have until October 5 to register to vote if you have not already done so in the county in which you plan to cast your ballot. If you’re unsure whether you are registered, you can use this tool on the Texas Secretary of State’s website. For more information about registering, click here.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: June 12, 2020

You have until Monday, June 15, to register to vote in the July 14 primary runoff election (and a special election if you happen to live in Texas Senate District 14). While you are making your voting plan for the July election, check out this week’s education news from ATPE Governmental Relations.


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: Phase three to reopen Texas is well underway, with restaurants allowed to expand capacity to 75% starting today. By next Friday, amusement parks and carnivals in counties with more than 1,000 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 may open at 50% capacity. Gov. Greg Abbott spoke with CBS Austin this week and noted that, with cases on the rise, his contingency plan should there be a resurgence will be to first roll back non-essential surgeries and other medical procedures.

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) updated quite a few coronavirus-related web resources this week. TEA’s closure support and guidance page includes updates on personal protective equipment and other safety guidance for summer school, graduation, and UIL. Information on residential programs has been updated on the special education page. TEA also provided an updated COVID-19 waivers document.

Changes were also announced this week that will impact educator certification candidates who are beginning internship requirements but have not taken their test and candidates who are required to complete otherwise face-to-face educator preparation program (EPP) requirements in the 2020-21 school year. Specifically, eligible candidates who are beginning internships will be able to obtain an intern certificate upon recommendation of their EPP, without having to meet testing requirements first. (Fingerprinting requirements remain in place.) This is similar to a previous waiver that allowed certification candidates who had completed all EPP requirements except their test to obtain a probationary certificate. Candidates who would otherwise be expected to complete face-to-face requirements such as clinical teaching will be able to meet these in a virtual setting. Read more here and find more information below about similar developments at the State Board for Educator Certification this week.

As always, ATPE’s Coronavirus FAQ and Resources page is being frequently updated with the latest information on COVID-19 issues for educators.


ELECTION UPDATE: It’s almost election time again! The deadline to register to vote in the July 14 runoff election (and a Texas Senate District 14 special election happening the same day) is Monday, June 15, 2020. For more on registration and why this election is important, check out this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Make sure you’re registered and learn what’s on your ballot here. View candidate profiles, including their ATPE survey responses and voting records, on Teach the Vote here. If you feel you meet the eligibility criteria to vote by mail, your application for a mail-in ballot must be received by your local election administration (not postmarked) no later than July 2. Find additional information about voter registration from the League of Women Voters here, plus get election reminders and other resources from the Texas Educators Vote coalition here. Early voting begins June 29!


FEDERAL UPDATE: Facing the unprecedented threat of the deadly novel coronavirus, Congress entered the spring of 2020 with what has become an extremely rare sense of bipartisan purpose, passing four large legislative packages to provide funding for hospitals and health care workers fighting the virus, as well as for businesses and individuals affected by the closures and stay-at-home orders implemented to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The federal CARES Act provided $30 billion for the U.S. Department of Education, including $13.5 billion for elementary and secondary education formula funding to be provided directly to states.

David Pore

ATPE has been tirelessly lobbying Congress to enact laws and policies that protect your ability to effectively educate students and retire with financial security. That includes fighting to repeal the arbitrary Social Security offsets that unfairly reduce the retirement benefits of educators. Read more about how ATPE is advocating for you in Washington, D.C. in this update from ATPE’s federal lobbyist, David Pore, as published in the ATPE News Summer 2020 edition.

 


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) held a special meeting this week to consider a new rule that will allow more flexibility for educator certification candidates undergoing face-to-face requirements such as internships, field experiences, clinical experiences, practicums, and observations. The changes will be limited to the 2020-21 school year and will allow for at least partial completion of these requirements in a virtual setting. Read more about yesterday’s SBEC meeting and the proposed rule language in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


A recent study by researchers at Princeton and Tufts Universities finds that “teachers are people too,” when it comes to racial biases. In the peer-reviewed study published in the prestigious journal Educational Researcher in April 2020, the authors found that teachers, while surely well-intentioned, are no different in their levels of implicit and explicit biases from non-teachers of the same race, level of education, age, gender, and political affiliation. This finding highlights the need for training and supports to help teachers work toward recognizing and combating biases that may negatively impact students. The study authors also point out that due to the progress we must make with respect to teacher racial bias, schools are not likely to be the great societal equalizers that so many conclude they are. Read more about the study here.

Texas election roundup: Registration deadline approaching!

It’s hard to imagine, but we are quickly approaching another important election in Texas! The primary runoff elections that were postponed to July 14 from their original May 26 date are almost upon us. In fact, Monday, June 15, 2020, is the last day to register to vote before this election.

Not sure if you are registered to vote? Check your status online using this handy resource provided by the Texas Secretary of State. It’s a great habit to get into to take two minutes to make sure your voter address and registration status are correct and up-to-date. If you need to register or make corrections to your registration, click here.

While the following saying may or may not be attributable to founding father Thomas Jefferson, it is nonetheless true:

“We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.”

This is why ATPE continues to emphasize the importance of voting, and why your vote in a runoff election may be the most influential vote you cast throughout the entire election cycle. That’s because turnout is typically so low in a runoff election that the outcome of each race may be decided by just a handful of voters.

This is a critical time for our state. The candidates voters choose to represent them will have tremendous influence over school funding, state assessments, teacher pay, school safety, and countless other issues that will be even more important in light of the pandemic and the resulting economic recession. To put an even finer point on the matter, candidates elected this year to the Texas Legislature could make the difference in next year’s state budget decisions that will have a direct impact on school district staffing.

Remember also that in many cases here in Texas, the winners of the July 14 runoffs will become the ultimate winners of the final election in November, since so many races in Texas are decided by the primaries and not the general election. If you are eligible to vote in the upcoming runoff, as many of you are, we encourage you to learn about the candidates ahead of the election, and make sure your family and friends turn out to vote, as well.

Find out who is running in your district by checking out the Candidates section of our Teach the Vote website. Read their responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey, check out the incumbent legislators’ voting records on education issues, and arm yourself with the information necessary to make an informed choice in support of public education.

Make your voice heard. Early voting in the runoff elections begins June 29, 2020.

UPDATE: Texas election roundup: Runoff registration

*This post has been updated to reflect the governor’s decision to extend early voting in the July 14 primary runoffs by one week in an attempt to accommodate greater social distancing. Early voting will begin Monday, June 29, as opposed to July 6.

With the endless daily news updates on the coronavirus, it’s easy to forget that there’s still an election creeping up on us. The primary runoff elections that were originally scheduled to be held this month are now set for July 14, although a fierce battle is being waged over the best way to conduct this election in order to ensure the safety of Texas voters. We’ll provide an update on that important battle in a separate post. Instead, today’s post will brush up on who can vote in the runoffs.

In Texas, you don’t have to declare a political party. The primary elections are open, which means that anyone can vote in any primary they choose — but only one! If a single candidate doesn’t win at least 50% of the vote in a primary election with three or more candidates, the top two finishers head to a primary runoff election.

Anyone can vote in the runoffs — even if they didn’t vote in the the primaries! If you didn’t vote in the primary elections, you can vote in whichever party’s runoff you choose. It’s as simple as that.

Now here’s where the rules for runoffs get slightly more complicated. If you voted in the March 3 primary elections, you can only vote in the same party’s primary runoff election. So for example, if you voted in the Republican primary on March 3, then you can only vote in the Republican party’s runoff on July 14. You can’t switch.

So, how do I know if I’m eligible to vote? You have to be registered to vote in the county in which you live. If you’re not sure whether you’re registered — maybe you recently moved — you can check your registration status by clicking here. If you’re an eligible citizen 18 years or older and are not registered, the deadline to register to vote in the runoff elections is Monday, June 15, 2020. If you need to register, click here.

Here is a list of key dates leading up to the election:

  • Monday, June 15: Last day to register to vote in the July 14 elections.
  • Thursday, July 2: Last day to apply for a mail ballot. Applications must be received by the  election administrator on this date.
  • Monday, Jun 29: First day to vote early in person.
  • Friday, July 10: Last day to vote early in person before Election Day.
  • Tuesday, July 14: Primary Runoff Election Day.

Polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. Mail ballots must be received by the county election administrator by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day, with some exceptions, in order to count.

If you’re unsure of whether there is a runoff election in your district, just check the Candidates tab here at TeachtheVote.org and enter your address. You can also find the full list of runoff races in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

As we’ve previously reported, the low turnout typical of runoff elections means your vote in these races could be the single most influential vote you cast this election season! Consider this: Just 23.8% of registered voters participated in the March 3 primaries this year. That’s fewer than one in four! A little under 9% of voters cast ballots in the 2018 primary runoffs, which included a runoff for a statewide race. That means your vote in a runoff election is more than twice as likely to influence the outcome of an election as it is in a primary. And with the unprecedented level of uncertainty around this election in particular, each vote will represent even more.

Speaking of uncertainty, one of the biggest questions remains whether Texas leaders will provide a safe process for voting while the deadly coronavirus is still in circulation. Many voters have expressed a desire for mail-in voting eligibility to be expanded during the pandemic, but state officials are pushing back against the idea. We are monitoring this topic closely and will post new information here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog as developments occur.

Texas election roundup: Runoff endorsements and late surprises

As the rest of Texas turns its focus to the primary election runoffs, it turns out there is still a surprise or two left over from last Tuesday’s primary elections. In House District (HD) 47, Justin Berry now appears to lead Don Zimmerman by a single vote for the second spot in the Republican party runoff. Until Wednesday, it appeared Zimmerman held the one-vote lead over Berry. Votes will be canvassed today and a recount seems likely. The winner will face top primary finisher Jennifer Fleck in the Republican runoff in May.

The runoffs have already brought a fresh round of endorsements. In the Senate District (SD) 27 Democratic party runoff, former Texas Parent PAC endorsed candidate Ruben Cortez endorsed Sara Stapleton Barrera on Friday. Stapleton Barrera is challenging longtime Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. in the runoff. Emily’s List endorsed former congressional candidate M.J. Hegar in the Democratic runoff for U.S. Senate against state Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas). The winner will face Republican U.S. Sen. John Cornyn in November. There was also one highly unusual anti-endorsement in the Republican runoff for State Board of Education (SBOE) District 5. All 10 Republican sitting members of the SBOE endorsed Lani Popp over former Travis County GOP Chair Robert Morrow. Morrow won 40% of the vote in the primary, but is an extremely controversial figure who has been the source of no small amount of angst for Republicans.

In the Texas Senate, state Rep. Eddie Rodriguez (D-Austin) and Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt have each announced they are running for the seat being vacated by state Sen. Kirk Watson (D-Austin) in SD 14. Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick has appointed Sen. Judith Zaffirini (D-Laredo) to the Senate Education Committee to replace Watson, whose resignation will be effective April 30, 2020. Gov. Greg Abbott has not yet set a date for the special election to fill the SD 14 seat.

Some interesting statistics have emerged from last week. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Democrats outvoted Republicans in typically conservative Collin and Denton Counties. Across four Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan counties, 22% more Democrats than Republicans voted in this year’s primary elections. While Democratic turnout was up, Republican turnout was down 43% from 2016. According to Jeff Blaylock of TXElects.com, this year marked the third time in Texas history that 4 million Texans voted in a primary election. The other two times that happened were in the 2008 and 2016 presidential election years. Turnout in last week’s primaries was about 25%, which is the third highest since 1992. Turnout in Texas was historically higher before then, with a spike above 35% back in 1978. Thanks, Jeff, for crunching those numbers.

The runoffs offer educators a chance to cast the most influential vote of the year. You can read more about why that is, as well as see who’s running, in this post about runoffs here on Teach the Vote. You can also sign up for important election reminders by visiting our coalition website for Texas Educators Vote.

Election 2020: The runoff rundown

Super Tuesday has come and gone, but many Texans have a runoff election just around the corner! In any primary election where a single candidate failed to win more than 50% of the vote, the top two candidates will head to a runoff election on May 26, 2020, to determine who wins their party’s nomination. This is your comprehensive guide to the runoffs from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.

The Candidates

The easiest way to know if you have a runoff election where you live is to visit the Candidate Search page here at Teach the Vote and enter your address. Here’s a list of all the runoffs around the state:

Some of the more high-profile races include the Republican runoff for State Board of Education (SBOE) District 5, in which controversial figure Robert Morrow came out on top in the primary election polling. Other hot races include the Democratic primary in Senate District (SD) 27, in which Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. is headed to a runoff after serving three decades in the Senate. In House District (HD) 59, Rep. J.D. Sheffield, a longtime Texas Parent PAC-endorsed officeholder, is facing a runoff opponent. Another Texas Parent PAC-endorsed candidate, Glenn Rogers, is headed to a runoff for the open seat in HD 60. Our Texas Primary election results blog post has more information on what happened Super Tuesday.

The Timing

The runoff election date is May 26, preceded by a week of early voting May 18 through May 22, 2020. If you didn’t vote in the primaries because you weren’t registered to vote, April 27 is the last to day to register in order to vote in the runoffs. If you’re newly eligible to vote and not yet registered, or recently moved to a different county and never updated your voter registration, now is the time to register!

Keep in mind, also, that there are two sets of elections taking place during the month of May. First, May 2, 2020, is the uniform election date for local elections, which often include school bond propositions, school board races, and other local matters. This is separate from the primary election runoffs that are decided on May 26, 2020. Check out all of the upcoming 2020 election dates, including early voting periods, as we shared in our Spring 2020 issue of ATPE News. We urge educators to vote in every election!

The Rules

Who gets to vote in a runoff election? If you voted in the Democratic primary this year, then you can only vote in the Democratic runoff. If you voted in the Republican primary this year, then you can only vote in the Republican runoff. If you didn’t vote in either primary this year, then you can vote in either party’s runoff election. The voting procedures are the same as in the runoff election. You’ll want to bring along one of the approved forms of identification or mark a form at the polling location indicating you have a “reasonable impediment” to obtaining that identification.

The Stakes

Why is my vote important? There were plenty of races decided on March 3 by just a handful of votes. Voter turnout in Texas is typically low, especially in primary elections and even more so in runoff elections. Just 23.8% of registered voters — less than one in four — participated in the March 3 primaries this year, despite the fact that this is a presidential election year. A little under 9.0% cast ballots in the 2018 primary runoffs, which included a statewide runoff for the Democratic gubernatorial candidate. That means your vote in a runoff election is more than twice as likely to influence the outcome of an election as it is in a primary. And it’s absolutely critical that educators influence elections in 2020. Everything from funding for schools and teacher salaries to electoral maps that decide who gets elected in the future are up for grabs. You can read more in our Primary Colors blog series here on Teach the Vote.

Now let’s start making a voting plan for the May 26 runoffs!

Texas election roundup: Pro-public education endorsements

Early voting in the 2020 Texas primary elections begins next Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020, which is also Educator Voting Day. In Texas election news, a new wave of candidate endorsements that may be of interest to educators were announced this week.

Texas Parent PAC, which exclusively supports candidates who support public education, announced 10 primary election endorsements this week. These include House District (HD) 9 Rep. Chris Paddie (R-Marshall), HD 41 Rep. Bobby Guerra (D-McAllen), HD 59 Rep. J.D. Sheffield (R-Gatesville), HD 60 candidate Dr. Glenn Rogers, HD 72 Rep. Drew Darby (R-San Angelo), HD 100 Rep. Lorraine Birabil (D-Dallas), HD 119 candidate Jennifer Ramos, HD 127 Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), HD 128 candidate Robert Hoskins (R), and SD 27 candidate Ruben Cortez (D).

Texas Parent PAC is endorsing at least two candidates who are challenging incumbent legislators. Robert Hoskins is facing Rep. Briscoe Cain (R-Deer Park) in the House. Ruben Cortez, currently serving on the State Board of Education, is challenging Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville) for a Senate seat. Both races have attracted media attention recently. As the Houston Chronicle reported, Hoskins has the support of nearly all the local officials in his suburban Houston district, while a handful of state representatives from other districts have been stumping for Cain. Meanwhile Sen. Lucio’s office was the site of protests this week by progressive activists who are unhappy with the senator’s voting record, as reported by KGBT.

The Austin American-Statesman endorsed Rep. Erin Zwiener (D-Driftwood) and Republican candidate Bud Wymore in the HD 45 Democratic and Republican primaries, respectively. The newspaper also endorsed Jenny Roan Forgey for the Republican nomination in HD 47, which is held by Rep. Vikki Goodwin (D-Austin), and recommended Jenai Aragona-Hales in the Republican primary for HD 49, a seat held by Rep. Gina Hinojosa (D-Austin). While Hinojosa’s seat is safely Democratic, Zwiener and Goodwin both managed to flip seats in 2018 that were previously held by Republicans.

Earlier this week, new Gary Gates (R-Rosenberg), Lorraine Birabil (D-Dallas), and Anna Eastman (D-Houston) were sworn into office as new state representatives for House Districts 28, 100, and 148, respectively. All three won special runoff elections in late January and are on the ballot in 2020 vying for a full term.

In federal election news, the Texas Tribune reported Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg announced plans to employ 24 staffers in Texas after strong finishes in Iowa and New Hampshire. Michael Bloomberg, Elizabeth Warren, and Bernie Sanders all have staff working in Texas ahead of the March 3 primary on “Super Tuesday.”

With early voting just a few days away, it’s important to remember that elections are decided by who shows up! Check out the election-related resources from our coalition partners over at Texas Educators Vote, including text message reminders when an important election is coming up. You can also research candidates in your own local races here at Teach the Vote. Please make plans to vote next week, and encourage your family and friends to do the same!

Texas election roundup: Next stop primaries!

The big election news this week involved three special runoff elections, most notably the race for House District (HD) 28 in Fort Bend County. In a race that drew national attention from both parties, Republican Gary Gates defeated Democrat Eliz Markowitz to keep the seat under Republican control. Voters also elected Democrats Lorraine Birabil and Anna Eastman to become new state representatives for HD 100 in Dallas and HD 148 in Houston, respectively. Read our recap of the special runoff election results from ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell here on Teach the Vote.

A new poll released by the Texas Lyceum this week shows Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders leading the field of presidential hopefuls among likely Texas Democratic primary voters, registering 28 percent and 26 percent support, respectively. Elizabeth Warren trailed at 13 percent, followed by Michael Bloomberg at 9 percent and Pete Buttigieg at 6 percent. The same poll showed Sanders polling the best out of the Democratic contenders in a head-to-head matchup with President Donald Trump. According to the poll, Texas voters gave Trump a slight edge at 50 percent compared to 47 percent for Sanders.

The next election is the statewide primary, early voting for which begins February 18 and lasts through February 23. Primary Election Day, known as Super Tuesday, is March 3, 2020. Remember that voting is the single most important way to ensure Texas will have pro-public education legislators working in the best interest of you and your students. Check in with our friends at the Texas Educators Vote coalition for election resources and to sign up for important election reminders. We also encourage you to check out the education-themed candidate forums taking place around the state and sponsored by the Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation.

Most importantly, make sure you are registered to vote in the upcoming primary election! The deadline to register to vote in this election is Monday, Feb. 3, 2020.

Texas election roundup: Early voting in special runoffs

Early voting is underway this week in the special runoff elections in Dallas, Houston, and Fort Bend County. The special runoff in House District (HD) 28 in Fort Bend County has drawn national attention as Texas Democrats seek to capture a seat previously held by Republican state Rep. John Zerwas.

Republicans hold a nine-seat majority in the Texas House of Representatives, and Democrats are anxious to flip as many seats as possible in order to wrest control of the lower chamber heading into the 2021 legislative session. Democratic candidate Eliz Markowitz, who was endorsed by the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC, was joined on the campaign trail this week by former presidential candidates Julian Castro and Beto O’Rourke. Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren also announced her support for Markowitz this week.

On the Republican side, the Quorum Report reported the Texas GOP is busing block walkers from all over Texas into Fort Bend to aid Republican candidate Gary Gates. The Gates campaign claimed their internal polling this week showed Gates up 13 percentage points over Markowitz. According to campaign reporter Jeff Blaylock, while Republican political consultant Derek Ryan’s analysis of the first two days of early voting show that only 46% of HD28 voters have recent Republican primary voting history but no Democratic primary history. Mail ballots in the HD 28 special runoff election have already surpassed the number submitted in the 2018 general election.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, 16.1 million Texans are now registered to vote. Voting is the single most important way to exercise your political voice, and early voting in primaries across the state begins in just a few weeks! The deadline to register to vote for the March 3 primary is February 3. Visit our friends at TexasEducatorsVote.com to find out how to register to vote and to access voter resources, including text reminders when an important vote is coming up.