Category Archives: TEA

SBOE wraps up November meeting with goodbyes

The State Board of Education (SBOE) met Friday, November 20, to conclude its week-long meeting with a final vote on revisions to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for health, physical education, and science.

Former SBOE chairs Donna Bahorich (left) and Barbara Cargill (right)

Before discussing the TEKS, the board said goodbye to former chairs Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) and Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands), as well as Members Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo) and Ken Mercer (R-San Antonio). All four members announced their intent to retire at the end of the current term and will be succeeded in January by winners of the November 2020 general election. ATPE thanks these outgoing members for their years of service.

On Wednesday, the board approved a list of its recommendations for legislation in the upcoming session of the 87th Texas Legislature. SBOE members also voted Friday to add a recommendation that their board be empowered to impose administrative penalties on publishers who fail to follow the instructional materials process.

Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence), who chairs the Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund (PSF) noted that Wednesday’s board vote to set the distribution rate for the next biennium to 4.18% marked a total two-year distribution of $3.34 billion, “the largest in the history of the fund.”

The SBOE also gave the final green light to a new administrative rule that will allow Legacy Master Teachers, including Legacy Master Reading Teachers, to retain their certificates without expiration. After receiving feedback from master reading teachers whose certificates were scheduled to expire as a result of last session’s House Bill 3, ATPE brought the issue to the attention of Texas Education Agency staff and state officials. This solution will ensure those certificates do not expire and Legacy Master Teachers will remain eligible to retain their current teaching assignments.

ATPE criticizes state’s response to local COVID-19 issues

On Monday, November 2, ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes sent a letter to Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath to complain about the state’s recent handling of certain local COVID-19 issues.  “As the pandemic continues to affect all aspects of life, educators are disappointed with what they perceive as a lack of leadership shown by state officials and the Texas Education Agency (TEA) as school districts across the state grapple with very real challenges,” wrote Holmes. The letter cites two recent examples of local challenges stemming from the pandemic that TEA has failed to adequately address.

The first example is in the El Paso area, where coronavirus-related hospitalizations have soared, leading a local judge to order a two-week shutdown of non-essential businesses, which Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton immediately sought to undo this week. The alarming increase in case counts also prompted Region 19 superintendents to ask state officials for additional flexibility on reopening their campuses for in-person instruction. TEA subsequently released revised guidance in a Region 19 School Safe Zones plan that would allow school districts in that particular region to have fewer students on their campuses than previously required. The state has limited the time that school districts can operate remotely without risking a loss of funding, but the Region 19 plan offers the possibility of additional flexibility for some districts.

ATPE lauded the agency’s decision to begin using objective, virus-related metrics at the local level in determining when it is safe to reopen campuses, which ATPE has recommended for months in previous communications with Morath and the governor. However, our letter this week also included specific recommendations on making the Region 19 School Safe Zones plan more effective. ATPE also urged TEA to apply the revised criteria statewide so that added flexibility could be used by any school district facing a surge in cases similar to what we have seen in El Paso.

In our letter, ATPE also criticized TEA for failing to enforce its own COVID-19 guidance and turning a blind eye toward some school district decisions to ignore recommended and mandated health and safety precautions. Some districts have neglected to report COVID-19 cases to the state as required or have refused to enforce other safety measures, including the governor’s order on wearing masks. TEA has declined to take any action in response to complaints that it considers to be “local in nature,” leaving them instead for school boards to decide. The letter from Holmes to Morath state, “ATPE feels compelled to speak out in condemnation of both a reckless disregard for safety in some districts and your inaction in the face of these situations.”

Read the full ATPE letter here.

ATPE and others recommend changing the state’s charter application process

Following immediately on the heels of the approval of the latest round of new charter school operators, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) is looking to finalize its Generation 26 Charter Operator Application Process. On October 22, ATPE and 19 other pro-public education organizations sent feedback to the agency recommending 37 changes to the application process.

Top recommendations made by the groups include the following:

  • Requiring charter applicants to identify the specific zip code where any new charter campus, or campuses, will be located so that the need for a new charter campus can be more accurately assessed.
  • Requiring TEA to consider and make public the additional cost to the state of new campuses proposed in the application submitted by each prospective new charter operator.
  • Requiring TEA to expand the criteria for approval of new charters to include the impact of the proposed charter on public schools and local communities.
  • Requiring TEA to change the application process to a two-year cycle to accommodate the demands of the legislative session and allow for more accurate budget projections based on approved charter enrollment.
  • Requiring the charter applicant to provide additional information that would better inform the agency, external reviewers, SBOE members, and the public. Such additional information includes related party and real estate transactions; professional development hours by proposed programs; more specific information about innovative programs; and unredacted management services agreements.

Read the full list of changes sought by ATPE and the other organizations here.

Highlights of the Oct. 9 SBEC meeting

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today to take up several agenda items, including final adoption of a new, ATPE-supported rule that will eliminate the expiration date of the Legacy Master Teacher certificates. ATPE testified against another proposal that would lower the security and reliability of discipline-related communications made by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to educators.

Highlights:

  • Final approval of Legacy Master Teacher lifetime certificates sends the proposal to the SBOE.
  • Extension of the EdTPA pilot into a third year.
  • Positive discussion of adding K-12 representatives, including ATPE, to advisory committee.
  • Board cautiously moves forward with discussion of discipline-related email communications to educators.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified against a discussion-only proposal that would substitute email for certified and regular mail methods of communications used by TEA during the disciplinary process. TEA justified the change by citing that email is more modern and will save the agency money. Chevalier argued that disciplinary communications carry deadlines and serious consequences for educators and their careers, making it inappropriate to use email, which is not federally protected like regular mail, can be impacted by spam filters and hackers, and does not have a reliable proof of receipt mechanism, unlike certified and registered mail. Chevalier said the change would open the door to litigation by educators who feel their due process rights have been violated. Read Chevalier’s written testimony here and view her oral testimony here (at the 2:00:00 mark).

After a lengthy process initiated by ATPE last year, the board unanimously adopted new language that will effectively transition the Legacy Master Teacher certificate into a lifetime certificate. After being reviewed at the November State Board of Education (SBOE) meeting, the changes are expected to take effect at the end of December 2020. TEA has stated that they will reach out to all impacted educators. Read our written testimony in support of this change here.

Items adopted by the board:

  • The four-year rule review of 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 234, which provides requirements relating to certification and preparation for members of the military community.
  • Changes to the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP) allowing EPPs to be “Not Rated: State of Disaster” for 2019-20, include a third indicator accounting for student achievement, provide an index system that combines the five performance indicators into an index for purposes of accreditation, and update the ASEP manual.
  • Changes to the assignment rules to update references to “legacy” master teacher certificates and to incorporate course changes approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) such as ethnic studies and the consolidation of CTE and Technology Applications courses.
  • The five-year continuing approval of 16 EPPs based on the results of their 2019–20 reviews.
  • The extension of the edTPA performance assessment pilot period for an additional, third year during which new pilot participants can be admitted.
  • The approval of these SBEC meetings dates in 2021:
    • February 12, 2021
    • April 30, 2021
    • July 23, 2021
    • October 1, 2021
    • December 10, 2021

Items discussed by the board:

  • Proposed amendments regarding how individuals licensed in other states may obtain a standard Texas educator certificate, providing for a temporary one-year certificate in certain cases.
  • TEA staff provided an update on the Science of Teaching Reading (STR) examination requirement transition, stating that only 70 out of 122 EPPs that offer STR-impacted certification areas have submitted attestations that they are able and ready to prepare candidates for the new STR exam requirements beginning January 1, 2021. Test development for new certification areas such as Special Education EC-6 and DeafBlind will be discussed at a future meeting.
  • TEA staff also discussed a proposal to change the composition of the Educator Preparation Advisory Committee (EPAC), the only standing committee that advises on SBEC matters, to include more K-12 representation in addition to EPPs. The proposal includes a provision calling for a representative from ATPE to be included on the committee.

At the end of the meeting, newly appointed board member Julia Dvorak requested that a special work session be convened to look at administrative rules on contract abandonment and equity in contract abandonment.

TEA gets federal funding to grow charters and approves one controversial charter chain’s expansion

Mike Morath

Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath approved the controversial expansion of IDEA, one of the state’s largest charter school chains, to 12 new campuses in 2021.

The commissioner announced his decision last week despite 18 education organizations, including ATPE, calling for a moratorium on the expansion of taxpayer-funded charter school chains while the state faces a $4.6 billion budget deficit caused by the economic recession. This recession threatens the funding of existing public schools, which must contend with both the economic conditions and educating 5.4 million students during the global COVID-19 pandemic.

The commissioner denied 15 of the 27 new campuses proposed by IDEA, but approved two new campuses in Odessa, two in La Joya, two in San Antonio, two in El Paso, two in Fort Worth, and two in Lake Houston. This will increase IDEA’s maximum enrollment by 15,000 students. Over the last four years, IDEA has expanded to 62 new campuses. Funded by Texas taxpayers, the charter chain has since doubled its budget, including spending on lavish executive salaries, private jets, and a luxury suite for the San Antonio Spurs.

Charter school chains differ from traditional public schools in the way they are funded and governed. While charter chains are run by private, unelected boards and are often tied to for-profit, out-of-state charter management organizations (CMO), they are funded almost entirely by state tax dollars. Independent school districts (ISD) are funded in part by the state and in part by local taxes. This means that charter chains cost the state more money per student than ISDs, to the tune of millions of dollars, depending on the size of the chain.

Under U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, a longtime proponent of school privatization, the U.S. Department of Education has placed an increasing focus on diverting federal tax dollars to charter chains. On Friday, the department announced it had designated more than $131 million in federal funding to expand charter chains nationwide, $33 million of which will go to expanding charter chains in Texas. The largest tranche of this federal funding went to the Texas Education Agency (TEA). The department awarded more than $23 million to the TEA for charter expansions and $10 million to the Texas Public Finance Authority, which allows charter chains to obtain public financing through taxpayer-backed bonds.

ATPE and other education organizations have pointed out that it is irresponsible to pour scarce tax dollars into expanding these privately run business ventures while the state faces a $4.6 billion budget shortfall that could result in less state funding for local schools — potentially leading to layoffs or other negative consequences to the public education system.

In September, the State Board of Education (SBOE) vetoed three of the eight new charter school chains TEA proposed to establish in Texas. The elected SBOE has the authority to determine whether a new chain is allowed to open for businesses in Texas. However once a new chain is established, the unelected commissioner has sole discretion over future expansions. The Texas Legislature could make charter chains more accountable to voters and taxpayers by expanding the SBOE’s veto authority to charter chain expansions as well.

 

TEA extends funding hold harmless period, ties to in-person instruction

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released a press statement today regarding how Texas public schools will be funded during the pandemic amid unstable enrollment.

TEA’s new funding mechanism will offer full funding to districts for a full 18 weeks, an extension of six weeks over the original 12 weeks of “hold harmless” offered by the agency, but with a significant strings attached. The hold harmless creates a cushion for districts that would otherwise lose funding due to unforeseen drops in enrollment because of the pandemic. Some districts have reported significant declines, especially in their prekindergarten and kindergarten grades, which are not mandatory in Texas.

The strings? In order for districts to receive the full funding for the 18 weeks held harmless, they must offer, or continue to offer, an in-person instructional option to all parents who request it. Additionally, the TEA release says that districts, “will be required to identify students who are missing from enrollment and determine their location.” Placing an additional administrative burden on already time and cash strapped districts of not only identifying students who were previously, but are not currently, enrolled in the district, but also of tracking down the whereabouts of students who are not currently enrolled.

As for future funding, the press release states, “TEA will address whether further funding adjustments for the second semester are needed based upon information and data gathered between now and January 2021.” As the Texas Legislature convenes in January, lawmakers will surely weigh in on school funding.

ATPE released a statement in response to the development from TEA, expressing gratitude for the change but regret that the agency has decided to tie funding to in-person instruction. In the statement, ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter commented on the agency’s conflict with their own recent guidance on extending remote instruction.

“Since schools have opened around the country, the percentage of new COVID-19 cases in the school-aged population has increased, according to a recent report by the American Academy of Pediatrics,” said Exter. “Just last week, TEA itself recognized that there are currently existing COVID-19 hotspots in Texas that warrant a delay in returning to in-person classes.”

Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates.

 

With fuzzy guidance from the state, school districts grapple with remote learning and timelines for resuming in-person instruction

Plans for resuming in-person instruction remain in flux across the state as many districts near the end of their allowed four-week transition period to move from virtual to in-person learning.

The latest Texas Education Agency (TEA) update to its statewide “Attendance and Enrollment” guidance reflects that some school districts may feel a need to request more than eight weeks of flexibility on resuming in-person instruction. “Any additional transition window will require board approval after preliminary TEA plan feedback has been received,” notes the TEA document released September 24, adding the agency will expect any district seeking additional transition time to be steadily increasing the number of students on campus during that period. But, despite assurances that the agency will take health-related metrics such as hospitalization data into consideration when reviewing such requests, the state’s decision-making remains discretionary and impossible to predict—leaving school districts grappling with how to proceed. ATPE believes this isn’t fair to administrators, teachers, parents, and certainly not students.

Since early summer, ATPE has urged the governor, Commissioner of Education Mike Morath, and other state officials to use objective, health-related data as the basis for school reopening decisions that are made at the local level. While we are glad to see the state’s recognition of some data on COVID-19 infections as a valuable consideration, ATPE believes it is unfair to leave school districts guessing as to whether the state ultimately will grant them additional flexibility if they believe it is unsafe for students to return to campus.

As we have reported, Gov. Abbott announced last week an easing of restrictions on restaurants and certain other businesses, but the changes were not applicable to three areas of the state that remain “danger zones”: Victoria, Laredo, and the Rio Grande Valley. Gov. Abbott said further reopening decisions would be based upon COVID-19 hospitalization data in the area, noting that the hospitalization numbers remained too high in those three areas, which include 13 Texas counties.

Rio Grande Valley school district leaders have been pleading with the commissioner and elected officials for additional flexibility on resuming in-person instruction. Today’s updated guidance notes that when reviewing district requests for extension of the transition period, TEA will consider “whether school systems are located in whole or in part in areas” identified as hot spots under the criteria referenced by the governor.

ATPE issued a press statement today in response to the new information from TEA. ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell stated in the release, “ATPE is pleased that state officials are finally listening to our recommendations on the importance of basing reopening decisions on objective, health-related data. However, TEA’s promise merely to ‘take into consideration’ such data offers little comfort for schools being pressured to reopen their facilities before it may be safe to do so under local health recommendations.”

School district approaches to reopening vary widely. COVID-19 has not affected every community to the same degree, and differing political views about the pandemic have put pressure on school boards. Not surprisingly, many districts have revised their initial plans and may still be considering further changes. Several districts are announcing plans to terminate virtual instruction, while others are looking for ways to extend it. The shifting landscape and fluctuating directives from school district leaders have been frustrating for educators and parents alike, resulting in emotional debates on social media and in school board meetings. Also frustrating is the red tape surrounding the decision-making process: Districts seeking to stretch out their return timeline must first secure initial board approval, then submit a request to TEA for “preliminary feedback,” and then ask for another board vote.

A few examples from across the state:

  • Fort Worth ISD began its school year with four weeks of remote instruction set to expire October 5. Last week, the FWISD board voted 5-4 against a motion that would have extended the district’s remote learning plan an additional four weeks. But this week, the board held another meeting and voted 5-4 in favor of adding two more weeks to the transition period. The change came after educators and parents testified at the 10-hour meeting, with some circulating petitions and organizing rallies on both sides of the issue. ATPE submitted testimony urging FWISD to base its decision on local public health data, paying close attention to the recommendations of Tarrant County Public Health.
  • Hardin ISD posted a notice on its website this week stating, “Due to less than acceptable virtual participation and student results, please be advised that Hardin ISD will cease virtual learning on Friday, October 2, 2020.”
  • Louise ISD sent a letter to parents September 22 stating, “The effort required of our teachers and administrators will no longer be divided by the requirements of offering remote learning beginning Tuesday, September 29, 2020 … I am not mandating that your family chooses to return to school. Yet, I am suggesting that you make a decision that continues to provide the appropriate needs of your children.” Superintendent Garth Oliver lists “suitable” options for parents to consider: returning to school in-person, transferring to a district that offers remote learning, or withdrawing from the public school system to either home-school or enroll in private school.
  • Brownsville ISD’s superintendent has urged stakeholders to lobby TEA for more flexibility. The Brownsville Herald reported September 19 that Superintendent Rene Gutierrez asked the state to allow BISD “to continue at 100% distance learning so that we can ensure everyone’s safety,” but the district plans to begin hosting students on campus September 28 because of state limitations on the timeline for operating remotely.

Commissioner Morath clarified on a call with superintendents today that no school district is required to offer remote instruction, but any parent who wants their child to continue attending school virtually must be allowed to transfer to a school district that offers it.

Meanwhile, the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases among on-campus students and staff is being reported by each school district and shared via an online dashboard. There is a lag in the reporting time, however, and the numbers reflect only test-confirmed cases of COVID-19 among individuals who have been on the campus. TEA posted this updated FAQ document about the COVID-19 data reporting today.

SBOE vetoes three proposed charter chains

The State Board of Education (SBOE) formally vetoed three applications to operate new charter school chains in Texas on Friday. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) had recommended eight new charter chains for approval at this week’s SBOE meeting.

The board has veto authority over new charter school operators. Members voted to veto Heritage Classical Academy in Houston and Rocketship Public Schools in Fort Worth. The board tentatively approved CLEAR Public Charter School in San Marcos at Thursday’s meeting, but reversed course and voted to formally veto the application Friday morning.

The board narrowly approved five of the eight charter chains recommended by TEA: Brillante Academy in McAllen, Doral Academy of Texas in Buda, Learn4Life Austin, Prelude Preparatory Charter School in San Antonio, and Royal Public Schools in San Antonio.

ATPE joined with numerous public education organizations this week in asking the board to veto all of the proposed new charter chains while Texas faces a $4.6 billion budget shortfall due to the economic recession driven by the COVID-19 pandemic and the volatile oil and gas market. This echoes a request ATPE and public education organizations made earlier this year to the commissioner of education to place a moratorium on charter chain expansions, which do not have to be approved by the SBOE.

SBOE tentatively approves 6 new charter chains

The State Board of Education (SBOE) narrowly voted to give tentative approval to six of the eight new charter school chains the Texas Education Agency (TEA) has recommended for approval this year.

A sharply divided board advanced Brillante Academy in McAllen, CLEAR Public Charter School in San Marcos, Doral Academy of Texas in Buda, Learn4Life Austin, Prelude Preparatory Charter School in San Antonio, and Royal Public Schools in San Antonio by a preliminary vote Thursday evening.

Members voted to veto Heritage Classical Academy in Houston and Rocketship Public Schools in Fort Worth. The board will take a final vote on the charter applicants in Friday’s formal meeting.

ATPE joined multiple education organizations in asking the board to consider whether spending tax dollars on new charters is the right thing to do at this moment. The board has the authority to veto new charter applicants.

Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar has warned Texas is facing a $4.58 billion shortfall heading into the next budget cycle due to the economic recession driven by the COVID-19 pandemic and volatile oil market. The eight charter chains up for approval at this week’s meeting are projected to cost the state an additional $12 million per year.

On Wednesday, Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath downplayed the idea that $12 million a year is a significant sum, but $12 million could cover the salaries of more than 200 educators at risk of being laid off due to the economic recession caused by COVID-19.

Once initially approved, charter chains are able to expand exponentially without need for approval from the SBOE, or any other elected official. More than 90 expansion amendments have been filed this year which could cost the state an additional $90 million annually. TEA has already approved at least 62 expansion amendments so far this year.

Among the eight charter chains up for approval this week are operators based in New York, Florida, and California. These states would be the recipients of Texas taxpayers’ dollars if these charter chains are approved.

ATPE joined with other education organizations earlier this year in calling for a moratorium on charter expansions. The same rationale applies to ATPE’s recommendation that the board deny the eight charter applications at this time.

Morath pitches new charters to skeptical SBOE

The State Board of Education (SBOE) is meeting in person this week to tackle a packed scheduled that includes discussion of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) curriculum standards for science, physical education, and health. The board is also discussing whether to approve and spend state tax dollars on eight new charter school systems recommended by the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

The board spent Tuesday hearing from hundreds of people voicing their opinions about the TEKS up for discussion. After a 13-hour day of testimony, the board resumed business Wednesday with its regularly scheduled update from Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath.

Commissioner Morath began Wednesday with a status report on reading academies, which all kindergarten through third grade teachers must complete by the 2022-23 school year. There are 20,000 teachers in more than 500 cohorts currently participating in the academies through 38 authorized providers.

The commissioner focused the majority of his presentation on a preemptive defense of the eight new charter schools he is recommending the SBOE approve this week. The board holds veto authority over all new proposed charter organizations, but that veto does not apply to individual campuses or expansions once an initial charter organization is approved. A bipartisan collection of members sharply questioned Morath over charter policy and the numbers used in his sales pitch Wednesday.

In response to a question by Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence), the commissioner said the total number of charter schools has grown from 484 in 2017 to 553 in 2019. The commissioner downplayed the total cost of charter schools, which Member Matt Robinson (R-Friendswood) pointed out are completely funded by state dollars through the Foundation School Program (FSP). This makes charter schools significantly more expensive to the state than traditional independent school districts (ISD), which are funded by a combination of state, local, and other funds.

The eight new charters the commissioner is proposing are estimated to cost the state $12 million per year once they are operating at capacity. This does not include the additional cost once they expand to additional campuses. Charter schools have submitted more than 90 expansion applications to TEA this year alone, which could cost the state an additional $90 million per year. At least 62 have been approved so far.

Member Robinson also noted that Texas faces an $11 billion decline in state revenue as a result of the economic recession driven by COVID-19. This has placed unprecedented stress on the state budget, prompting state leaders to call for 5% across-the-board cuts at state agencies. Robinson pointed out that despite this fiscal crisis, Commissioner Morath has increased the number of new charter schools he is proposing to open at the state’s expense from five last year to eight this year.

Member Pat Hardy (R-Fort Worth) added that some of the charters currently up for approval are based in California and New York. Member Hardy asked the commissioner, “How do we talk to taxpayers about sending tax dollars out of state?” Morath replied that the economy is globally interconnected. Member Hardy also asked whether only the top-performing schools are approved for expansion, leading the commissioner to state that while D- and F-rated charters were allowed to expand in the past, he believes they are no longer being allowed to grow.

“Is this the right year to be playing Shark Tank?” asked Member Ruben Cortez (D-Brownsville), comparing the proposed spending of state dollars on additional charter school experiments to the well-known TV show where inventors of new products pitch their ideas to investors.

Many of the board members’ concerns about spending state dollars on new charter schools at a time when Texas school districts are needing additional resources to combat the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic mirror those of ATPE and other organizations. Back in April, ATPE joined a coalition of 18 organizations that wrote to Commissioner Morath asking for a moratorium on charter expansions this year.

During today’s discussion, Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) echoed previous concerns about the higher state cost of funding charter schools, which the commissioner’s presentation to the board omitted. Perez added, “There’s a lot of good information you could be sharing, but this just isn’t it.”

Member Pam Little (R-Fairview) raised the issue of charters schools sending students with disciplinary issues back to their local ISD, while money stays with the charter. Commissioner Morath disputed Little’s characterization of the process.

Finally, Member Lawrence Allen (D-Houston) asked the commissioner a separate series of questions relating to educators. Asked by Member Allen whether TEA is collecting data on teacher retention under the threat of returning to school during the pandemic, Morath answered that the agency will not have that info until next September or October of 2021. Asked about resignations outside of the no-fault window, Morath suggested there are “a variety of exceptions” that will be handled on a case-by-case basis through the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC).

Following the commissioner’s comments, the board turned its attention to the Permanent School Fund (PSF). The board approved a $300 million one-time payment to the Available School Fund (ASF) via the real estate special fund account (RESFA) in order to support districts and cover the state’s obligations under last year’s House Bill (HB) 3. The board also tentatively approved a 4.0% distribution rate to the ASF for the 2022-23 biennium.

Members then spent the remainder of the day debating changes to the TEKS that were up for discussion on Tuesday. Any unfinished business from Wednesday’s meeting will be taken up following a public hearing scheduled for Thursday morning over the new charter applicants. Stay tuned to ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog for updates on the board’s actions this week.