Category Archives: SBOE

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Nov. 15, 2019

It is getting chilly outside! Cozy up and enjoy this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


ELECTION UPDATE: In the November 2019 election, roughly 12 percent of registered voters cast ballots. This is an improvement over the typical 8.5 percent of voters that show up to vote in odd-year Texas elections. Post-election, expect lots of buzz as 2020 candidates for office begin to file paperwork to run. Read more in this week’s election roundup from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. Also, read an in-depth analysis of the recent election in this Texas Tribune article.

If you didn’t get the chance to vote on November 5th, your next opportunity will be the primary elections on March 3, 2020. The deadline to register to vote in the primary is Feb. 3, 2020. Check to see if you are registered to vote here. Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com to get involved, find activities you can do to drive more participation in elections, and sign up for key voter updates. Plus, watch this space for an exciting new election-related resource coming your way soon!


The State Board of Education (SBOE) wrapped up its final week-long meeting of the year on Friday with little fanfare. Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath attended Wednesday’s session to give updates on a number of agency initiatives. In particular, he noted that Texas student performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress is higher than the nation in math, but lags in reading. Additionally, the commissioner discussed the STAAR readability study, new reading academy requirements for K-3 principals and teachers, and the Houston ISD takeover. The board also received hours of testimony on the proposed African American studies course, which was discussed favorably by new board chair Dr. Keven Ellis (R-Lufkin). Read a summary of Wednesday’s meeting, courtesy of ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced last week that the state would take over management of Houston ISD and two rural school districts, Shepherd ISD and Snyder ISD. This Thursday, the TEA held its second meeting for HISD parents and community members. The meeting took place at Wheatley High School – the persistently failing campus that partially led to the takeover. Community members expressed distrust and apprehension of the state takeover, unconvinced that it would solve the issues facing the district. Learn more in this reporting from the Texas Tribune.


All state legislators’ profiles on the Teach the Vote website have been updated to include key education voting records from the 86th legislative session. The ATPE lobby team analyzed all the education-related votes taken during the 2019 legislative session and selected a collection of recorded votes that will help Texans find out how their own lawmakers voted on major public education issues and ATPE’s legislative priorities. By sharing this information, we hope to help voters gain insight into incumbents’ views on public education so that they can make informed decisions at the polls during the critical 2020 election cycle. Use our search page here on Teach the Vote to look up how your legislators voted on education issues this year.

The candidate filing period opens this weekend for those seeking a place on the ballot in 2020. Once the candidate filing period ends, ATPE will be updating our Teach the Vote website to include profiles of all the candidates vying for seats in the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education. Stay tuned!


Are you an ATPE member with thoughts to share about education? The ATPE Governmental Relations team has released a short, three-question survey to gather member opinions on education issues, including results of the last legislative session.

Help us best represent your voice at the Texas Capitol by taking our new “Your Voice” survey on ATPE’s Advocacy Central. You must be signed into the ATPE website as a member to participate in the survey, so call the ATPE Member Services department at (800) 777-2873 if you’ve forgotten your password.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has released a new video in its “HB 3 in 30” series explaining the various (and plentiful) aspects of the 86th Legislature’s omnibus school finance bill House Bill (HB) 3. This week’s video explains the new high school graduation requirement stating that each student must complete the Federal Application for Financial Student Aid (FAFSA), Texas Application for Financial Student Aid (TAFSA), or through an exemption. This requirement begins with students enrolled in 12th grade in the 2021-22 school year. TEA is also required to create an advisory committee related to this requirement. Find all of the HB 3 in 30 videos here, along with related presentations.


 

SBOE hears from commissioner on NAEP scores, STAAR study

The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) met Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, in Austin for day one of its final meeting of the year. It is also the first SBOE meeting led by new board Chairman Keven Ellis (R-Lufkin). The meeting began with an update from Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath.

Commissioner Morath started with a review of Texas students’ most recent scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). While fourth grade math scores have held constant at slightly above the national average, eighth grade math scores have been trending downward since 2011 and dipped below the national average in 2019. Fourth grade reading has seen a minute overall decline since 2005. Eighth grade reading scores showed the only statistically significant change since 2017, indicating a precipitous decline since 2013 to the lowest level since at least 2003. According to Morath, the main takeaways from the 2019 NAEP scores are that while Texas continues to outperform the nation in math, it lags behind in reading.

Moving on to a discussion of House Bill (HB) 3906 passed earlier this year, Morath indicated that changes are coming to the STAAR test. Under HB 3906, no more than 75 percent of STAAR questions can be multiple choice. The commissioner said meeting this requirement will take a couple of years to field test. The bill also required a study of STAAR readability after studies found STAAR test questions written at reading levels well above the grade level being tested. The study has been assigned to the University of Texas and is in process. The first round of results are expected to be delivered in early December, and another round will be delivered in early February.

SBOE Member Marisa Perez-Diaz (D-San Antonio) inquired how educators could have more impact on STAAR questions while minimizing their time away from the classroom. Morath suggested the agency attempts to schedule educator advisory committee meetings in a way to minimize disruption, and has worked with districts to provide substitutes. Perez-Diaz requested a link to the application and a copy of the screening process for educator involvement.

Included among the requirements of HB 3 is a directive that teachers attend reading academies. SBOE Member Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands) voiced concern over teachers attending reading academies online instead of in person. The commissioner suggested that teachers who complete the online course would be required to demonstrate proficiency, as opposed to lesser threshold of completion under the in-person reading academy model.

Commissioner Morath briefly addressed the recently announced Texas Education Agency (TEA) takeover of Houston ISD by summarizing the agency sanctions process. Perez-Diaz questioned Morath regarding the process for transitioning from an agency-run board of managers back to a locally elected body, and the commissioner indicated it would take multiple years. SBOE Member Lawrence Allen (D-Houston) also pressed the commissioner to explain the TEA’s process for selecting a superintendent and members of the board of managers. The commissioner replied a committee is reviewing applications from prospective managers and he had made no decision yet who will be superintendent.

Packed house to testify in support of proposed African-American Studies course at SBOE meeting November 13, 2019.

Additionally, SBOE Member Ruben Cortez (D-Brownsville) questioned Morath over whether the agency takeover would include a partnership under SB 1882 (passed in 2017 by the 85th Texas Legislature), which incentivizes districts to contract with charter schools that take over operation of one or more campuses in the district. The commissioner did not directly address whether that would be considered, and suggested that the managers would consider a wide array of options. Cortez also pressed Morath for details regarding what would happen if a campus is closed, to which the commissioner said that campus would simply cease to exist.

The board spent much of the day hearing testimony regarding a proposed new African-American Studies course. State Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) was among dozens of witnesses who testified in support of the course. Chairman Ellis stated his goal is to have the course ready for students in 2020. The board will break into committees tomorrow and conclude its November meeting Friday.

Texas election roundup: Big shakeup at SBOE

Last week, outgoing State Board of Education (SBOE) chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) announced her plans to retire from the board. Following her announcement, a number of her Republican colleagues have also indicated plans to retire.

Donna Bahorich and Marty Rowley were photographed at a recent SBOE meeting. Both SBOE members have recently announced plans to retire from the board.

Member Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo) announced his plan to retire at the end of his current term, which expires in Jan. 2021. Rowley’s district is reliably Republican and covers much of West Texas. Past board chair Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands) and Member Ken Mercer (R-San Antonio) have also announced plans to retire. Mercer’s district has shifted from a majority Republican district to one that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. Democrat Beto O’Rourke carried Mercer’s district in 2018 with more than ten percent of the vote.

Candidates in this fall’s three special elections filed their 30-day-out campaign finance reports this week. As we expected, the House District (HD) 28 special election in Fort Bend County has drawn a significant amount of attention, where seven candidates are vying to fill the unexpired term of former Rep. John Zerwas. The lone Democrat in the race, educator Dr. Eliz Markowitz, reported raising $62,000, spending $16,000, and entering the final stretch with $38,000 cash on hand. Markowitz also received the endorsement of the pro-public education group Texas Parent PAC this week. Republican neurosurgeon Dr. Anna Allred reported raising $159,000 during the reporting period, which is more than the other five Republicans in the HD 28 race combined. Allred has also retained Republican consultant Allen Blakemore, whose top client is Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick. Allred has spent $142,000 and heads into the final stretch with $86,000 on hand.

In addition to the HD 28 special election, the Nov. 5 election will give all Texas voters the chance to vote on 10 proposed constitutional amendments. The Texas League of Women Voters has put out a comprehensive guide to the proposals, which you can view here. You can also find additional election resources at the website for the Texas Educators Vote coalition. We’ll be posting additional resources to help you prepare for the constitutional election here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog next week, so be sure to check it out before you head to the polls. Early voting begins Oct. 21.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 20, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Ellis and Bahorich

Dr. Keven Ellis (R) of Lufkin has been appointed as the new chair of the State Board of Education (SBOE). Dr. Ellis assumes the role after the previous chair, Donna Bahorich (R) of Houston, served the maximum of two terms over the last 4 years. Bahorich presided over last week’s SBOE meetings, which we covered here on our Teach the Vote blog, and she will remain a member of the board. Dr. Ellis has been an elected member of the board since 2016, and he recently represented the SBOE as vice chair of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance. Read more about Monday’s announcement of the SBOE change of leadership here on Teach the Vote.


ELECTION UPDATE: Tuesday, September 24, will mark the eighth annual National Voter Registration Day (NVRD), a non-partisan effort to increase civic participation. For more information on NVRD and other election news, including announcements about a key senator’s retirement and the race to succeed him, check out this week’s election update from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


This week’s edition of our “New School Year, New Laws” blog series on Teach the Vote covers the topic of special education. Following media reports and a federal investigation that found Texas had for years imposed an arbitrary, de facto cap on enrolling students into special education programs, this year’s legislative session was heavily focused on addressing special education, from increasing funding to enacting laws to raise awareness of students’  and parents’ rights. Read the latest blog post in our series by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier for a breakdown of new legislation that affects special education.


The TRS board met in Austin this week discussing topics ranging from healthcare affordability to retirees’ recently issued 13th check and potential office moves for the agency. Read more about the discussions in this new post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, who attended the TRS meetings this week.


A pair of hearings on the subject of school safety and preventing school violence took place this week in Texas and in Washington, DC, with more meetings scheduled in the near future.

First, in the nation’s capital this week, the U.S. House Committee on Education and Labor met Wednesday for a markup of H.R. 4301, the “School Shooting Safety and Preparedness Act” filed by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D – Hawaii). The measure calls for an annual report by the U.S. Department of Education on school violence data and would define in federal statute the terms “mass shooting” and “school shooting.” After a heated debate, the committee approved the bill by a party-line vote of 27-22, with some Republicans on the committee, including its ranking member, deriding it as a “publicity stunt.” For members of the Texas congressional delegation serving on the committee, Democrat Joaquin Castro voted for the measure, while Republicans Van Taylor and Ron Wright voted against it.

Here in Texas, the new House Select Committee on Mass Violence Prevention and Community Safety held its first meeting on Tuesday. During the organizational meeting, committee members heard invited testimony only from state law enforcement officials and mostly focused their conversation around the topic of threat reporting and investigations. A similar select committee established in the Texas Senate will hold its first meeting next week on Sept. 26.


BREAKING NEWS: Dr. Keven Ellis appointed chair of the State Board of Education

A press statement released earlier today announced that Dr. Keven Ellis of Lufkin has been appointed chair of the State Board of Education. Dr. Ellis assumes the role after the previous chair, Donna Bahorich, served the maximum of two terms over the last 4 years. A Parent PAC endorsee, Dr. Ellis has been a member of the board since 2016 when he won the open seat, vacated by previous board member Thomas Ratliff. Most recently Dr. Ellis represented the Board as the vice chair of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance. The full press release announcing the Governor’s appointment of Dr. Ellis can be found here.

 

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 13, 2019

Here’s this week’s education news wrap-up, courtesy of the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


SBOE Committee on School Initiatives meeting, Sept. 12, 2019

This week, members of the State Board of Education (SBOE) gathered in Austin to hold a series of meetings over Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, which ATPE’s lobbyists have been attending. View the full SBOE agenda and additional information about this week’s meetings here.

To kick things off, the board on Wednesday discussed the Texas Resource Review (TRR) process, formerly known as the Instructional Materials Quality Evaluation (IMQE). Acting as a rubric for instructional materials for English Language Arts and Reading (ELAR) in grades 3-8, the TRR will serve as a type of “consumer reports”  resources for school districts and educators looking for quality instructional materials. Read a full recap of Wednesday’s board meeting in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Other topics of discussion during this week’s meetings of the board and its committees include a new procedure for nominating members to the School Land Board (SLB), the ed prep assessment pilot known as “EdTPA,” and the Generation 25 charter application that would establish charters with new operators as opposed to letting existing charter holders expand their operations. ATPE’s Wiggins has more on the discussion of these items in this blog post from Thursday.

The board will wrap up its September meetings today. The full board’s agenda for today includes hearing from Commissioner of Education Mike Morath. Read more about his remarks at today’s SBOE meeting, which covered accountability and new reading academy requirements, in this Teach the Vote blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

Commissioner of Education Mike Morath speaking to the ATPE Board of Directors, Sept. 7, 2019

The board also took time today to recognize outgoing chair Donna Bahorich for her leadership with an honorary resolution. This will be the last meeting over which Bahorich will preside, pending the governor’s naming of a new chair for the SBOE.

Related: Commissioner Mike Morath also visited the ATPE Board of Directors meeting in Pflugerville on Sept. 7, 2019. The commissioner updated the board on accountability ratings, discussed the issue of merit pay, and more.


This year’s legislative session saw a slew of bills relating to assessments, from their administration and content to their duration and much more. For an in-depth look at which laws from the 86th session will affect things like end-of-course exams, individual graduation committees (IGCs), and the length of standardized state assessments, check out this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier. On Monday, we’ll have a another new post for our ongoing “New School Year, New Laws” weekly series here on Teach the Vote. You can also learn more about many new laws affecting educators in this comprehensive digital guide compiled by ATPE’s legal staff.


The latest iteration of “HB 3 in 30,” the Texas Education Agency’s weekly video series that breaks down the signature education bill of the 86th session, focuses on reading practices. Click here to watch the most recent video and access all the prior videos in the HB 3 in 30 series.


It was announced this week that Harrison Keller will become the new Commissioner of Higher Education, following the recent retirement of Commissioner Raymund Peredes. The announcement came Wednesday after a unanimous vote by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). Keller, who assumes the post on Oct. 1, has worked for the University of Texas and was a longtime education policy adviser to a former Texas Speaker of the House, Rep. Tom Craddick (R-Midland).


ELECTION UPDATE: Yet another big retirement announcement came today with Sen. José Rodriguez (D-El Paso) announcing that he will not seek re-election. An attorney, Sen. Rodriguez has described himself as the first member of his family to attend college. He was first elected to the Senate District 29 seat in 2010 and has also chaired the Senate Democratic Caucus.

Early voting for the upcoming November election begins on Oct. 21, just five weeks from now. For more information about what’s going to be on the ballot, check out our previous Teach the Vote blog posts on proposed constitutional amendments and some special elections that will be taking place on the same day. You can also use the resources provided by the Texas Educators Vote coalition to help ensure you are ready to vote. The deadline to register to vote for the November 5 election is Oct. 7, 2019.

Commissioner Morath updates SBOE on reading academies, accountability

Commissioner Mike Morath addresses the SBOE, Sept. 13, 2019.

Today, Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath addressed the State Board of Education (SBOE) during its third and final day of meetings this week. The Commissioner’s presentation began with changes that K-3 teachers will soon see regarding reading academies.

As required by House Bill (HB) 3 by Rep. Huberty (R-Kingwood), all teachers and principals of students in grades K-3 must have attended a “literacy achievement academy” by the 2021-22 school year. Based on recent “To the Administrator Addressed” (TAA) correspondence on reading academies, the Texas Education Agency’s latest “HB 3 in 30” video on reading practices, and the commissioner’s presentation to the SBOE today, it seems that the terms “reading academy” and “literacy academy” are being used interchangeably.

The commissioner explained today that, because this requirement will impact over 120,000 educators, the structure of reading academies will have to change. Current reading academies are essentially a year-long fellowship that include a 5-day summer workshop, three two-day professional development sessions, a three-day workshop after the school year, and continuous embedded coaching throughout the school year. A new blended (online modules) reading academy structure will be added that will have fewer days of professional development and coaching. Additionally, a new function will allow some educators to “test out” of the reading academy, and districts will be able to offer their own modified version of the reading academy. Commissioner Morath stated that this will reduce or eliminate the increased cost associated with this new mandate under HB 3.

At today’s meeting, the commissioner also addressed the 2019 accountability ratings, demonstrated the use of the txschools.gov accountability website, and showed SBOE members a new TEKS guide website. He announced that the advisory committees for HB 3 and HB 3906 will be posted this month (September). Lastly, Commissioner Morath informed the board that the STAAR readability study also included in HB 3 will be conducted with the assistance of the University of Texas at Austin and is due December 1, 2019.

Be sure to read ATPE’s blog series “New School Year, New Laws” every Monday for updates on new laws impacting education, including HB 3. Also, check out the great new resource that ATPE’s legal staff has created to advise educators on new laws: “Know the Law: An Educator’s Guide to Changes Enacted by the 86th Texas Legislature.” Download your copy of the guide here.

SBOE committee discusses charter schools, ed prep

SBOE Committee on School Initiatives meeting Sept. 12, 2019.

The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) members met Thursday in their respective committees to discuss a number of items of interest to educators. The Committee on School Initiatives began with a discussion of a new educator preparation pilot program called “EdTPA.” This two-year pilot program was discussed at length by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) and aims to increase rigor, although the final examination comes with a higher price tag. Members of the committee had several questions regarding the structure of the program and challenges unique to the EdTPA system.

Members then heard updates on the Generation 25 charter application, which is the process by which applicants may apply to the Texas Education Agency (TEA) for a new charter. It’s important to note that this application is not needed for existing charters to expand the number of schools under operation. The application is to establish new charter operators, which may plan to operate multiple schools and may expand in the future.

Member Matt Robinson (R-Friendswood) expressed concern over the number and quality of new charters expanding across the state, and in particular a lack of transparency in the process. Member Ruben Cortez (D-Brownsville) expressed disappointment that suggestions from board members to improve the application have yet to be incorporated into the new application. Members secured a commitment from TEA staff to consider a list of recommendations provided by a group of public education organizations, including ATPE, and report back to the board.

Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) questioned TEA staff at length over requirements that charter applicants notify the communities within which they intend to open a new charter school, as well as the requirements for a charter to expand its geographical boundary to beyond what was set forth in its initial application. Much of the criticism around charter schools has concentrated on the lack of public input on proposed new charters as a result of minimal notification requirements, as well as few checks on the ability of charter school organizations to expand far beyond their initial size.

The board will conclude its September meeting Friday with an update from TEA Commissioner Mike Morath.

SBOE in Austin for September meeting

Texas SBOE meeting September 11, 2019.

The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) met Wednesday in Austin for its three-day September meeting. Although her term as board chair concluded with the board’s June meeting, Member Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) presided over the board Wednesday as Gov. Greg Abbott has yet to announce her successor.

The board began with a discussion of a new process for Instructional Materials Quality Evaluation (IMQE), including recommendations for a commissioner rule from an ad hoc committee on the subject. The process is now called Texas Resource Review (TRR). Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) suggested that the process is still subjective, and Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff indicated that the process was the result of feedback from 30 pilot districts. Member Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo) posed a number of questions to TEA staff clarifying the potential legal ramifications of changes to the current process. Member Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands) expressed a desire to prevent the TRR from competing with or interfering with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) review process. After lengthy discussion, the board adopted a new board operating procedure barring an individual board member from nominating instructional materials to the TRR without a majority vote of the board endorsing the nomination.

The board also discussed the procedure for nominating members to serve on the School Land Board (SLB), which oversees a portion of the Permanent School Fund (PSF) overseen by the General Land Office (GLO). Legislation passed by the 86th Texas Legislature expanded the SLB to five members from three and allowed the SBOE to nominate candidates to serve in two of the five places. The governor will select the two members from among six candidates the SBOE nominates. The board’s Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund will recommend the six nominees from a list of 30, comprised of two nominees provided by each of the board’s 15 members. The full board will vote to approve the final six.

The SBOE and SLB must also meet jointly once per year as a result of legislation passed in 2019. Members voted to hold the first joint meeting during the SBOE’s scheduled meeting in April 2020. All following meetings will be held during the SBOE’s scheduled November meeting.

 

 

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: June 14, 2019

Here’s a look at this week’s education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


This week, Gov. Greg Abbott signed the school finance and property tax reform bill, House Bill (HB) 3, into law. This bill modifies how public schools are funded and attempts to shift some of the burden of paying for public education that has fallen heavily on the shoulders of local property taxpayers closer toward a balance point with the portion financed by the state. The bill also affects teacher compensation. Read a recap of the governor’s signing ceremony, as well as links to our analysis of what HB 3 does, in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

Gov. Abbott also signed Senate Bill (SB) 12 into law on the same day. The bill improves funding for the state’s pension system for educators. As a result of the bill’s signing this week, the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) expects a 13th check to be sent to retirees this fall, with a more specific date to be discussed at the TRS board’s next meeting in July.

Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates as this legislation is implemented, and don’t forget to check out ATPE’s full recap of all the education legislation that passed this session.


ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes discussed HB 3 with CBS Austin.

Speaking of HB 3, your ATPE lobbyists have been busy taking to the airwaves over the last two weeks to talk about the bill and its consequences for school finance and teacher pay.

ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes joined state Rep. James Talarico (D-Round Rock) and Austin education leaders on CBS Austin to take part in an hour-long panel on school finance last week. You can watch the entire panel’s discussion here on the CBS Austin website.

Also discussing HB 3 on TV and radio programs this week was ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. He joined the statewide politics program Capital Tonight on Spectrum News this week to discuss how teacher compensation is affected by the bill. You can watch the segment here on the Spectrum News website.


The State Board of Education (SBOE) met this week in Austin, where a handful of applications for new charter schools came under scrutiny. On Thursday, a board committee voted to exercise the board’s statutory authority to veto four of the five proposed new charters. Members expressed concerns over the fiscal impact, qualifications of the applicants, and accuracy of the applications. On Friday, the full board reversed course and voted to approve the new applications with one notable exception. Members voted 8-5 to reject the application for a new charter by the founder of Harmony Public Schools. Read ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins’s recap of Friday’s SBOE meeting here.

Commissioner of Education Mike Morath also updated the board this week on legislation passed by the 86th Texas Legislature that will affect public education, including HB 3 and changes to the STAAR assessment. Several of the education bills that passed this session will also require rulemaking by the commissioner before they can be fully implemented. Read a recap of the commissioner’s comments here.



A group of ATPE state officers and lobbyists were in Washington, DC this week to discuss federal education issues with elected officials and their staffs. ATPE State President Byron Hildebrand and Vice President Tonja Gray were accompanied by ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes and Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter on the fly-in, which was organized by ATPE’s longtime Washington-based lobbyist David Pore.

Issues discussed included education funding and the repeal of Social Security offsets like the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) that negatively impact educators and other public servants throughout the country. Stay tuned to our Teach the Vote blog next week for a complete report on these ATPE meetings in the nation’s capital.

If you are an ATPE member who’ll be attending the ATPE Summit in July, make plans to attend our legislative update session where the lobby team will brief members on these federal issues and the results of the recent Texas legislative session.