Category Archives: SBEC

SBOE wraps up November meeting with goodbyes

The State Board of Education (SBOE) met Friday, November 20, to conclude its week-long meeting with a final vote on revisions to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for health, physical education, and science.

Former SBOE chairs Donna Bahorich (left) and Barbara Cargill (right)

Before discussing the TEKS, the board said goodbye to former chairs Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) and Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands), as well as Members Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo) and Ken Mercer (R-San Antonio). All four members announced their intent to retire at the end of the current term and will be succeeded in January by winners of the November 2020 general election. ATPE thanks these outgoing members for their years of service.

On Wednesday, the board approved a list of its recommendations for legislation in the upcoming session of the 87th Texas Legislature. SBOE members also voted Friday to add a recommendation that their board be empowered to impose administrative penalties on publishers who fail to follow the instructional materials process.

Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence), who chairs the Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund (PSF) noted that Wednesday’s board vote to set the distribution rate for the next biennium to 4.18% marked a total two-year distribution of $3.34 billion, “the largest in the history of the fund.”

The SBOE also gave the final green light to a new administrative rule that will allow Legacy Master Teachers, including Legacy Master Reading Teachers, to retain their certificates without expiration. After receiving feedback from master reading teachers whose certificates were scheduled to expire as a result of last session’s House Bill 3, ATPE brought the issue to the attention of Texas Education Agency staff and state officials. This solution will ensure those certificates do not expire and Legacy Master Teachers will remain eligible to retain their current teaching assignments.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Oct. 9, 2020

Education supporters celebrated World Teachers’ Day on Monday. We at ATPE believe every day should be Teachers’ Day, and we thank you for your hard work each and every day! Here are this week’s other education news highlights, brought to you by ATPE Governmental Relations:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: Governor Greg Abbott announced this week that he is relaxing restrictions on bars this week, allowing those in counties with low hospitalization rates to open at a capacity of 50%, so long as their county judge opts in.

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) updated its COVID-19 resource page this week to reflect new guidance on attendance and enrollment, stating that school systems choosing to offer only remote instruction for a given day (such as Election Day) must ensure they meet the 75,600-minute requirement for the year and must still offer in-person instruction to families who want it. If the district remains in an approved transition period by Election Day and wants to offer remote-only instruction that day, it would be subject to TEA requirements that some students are present for on-campus instruction. Additionally, TEA noted that although school districts can adopt their own mask restrictions at school for students and staff, they cannot enforce mask requirements for voters on Election Day.

Also, the Texas Public Schools COVID-19 dashboard housed on the Department of State Health Services (DSHS) website was updated this week. The site uses data that school districts report to TEA on the number of test-confirmed cases among students and staff who engage in on-campus activities and instruction. Compared to last week’s reported numbers, the number of positive cases rose by 2.3% among students and 7.8% among staff.

Be sure to check out ATPE’s COVID-19 FAQs and Resources page and these other resources:

  • Get answers to common legal questions about COVID-19 and earn CPE by watching ATPE’s webcasts on our professional learning portal.
  • Use our Parent-Teacher Toolkit, featuring our latest video on giving each other grace.
  • See the pandemic and ATPE’s response evolve through our updated, interactive timeline.
  • Send messages to your government officials through Advocacy Central (for ATPE members only).

ELECTION UPDATE: Early voting begins Tuesday, October 13, and lasts three weeks through October 30. The Texas Supreme Court this week upheld Gov. Greg Abbott’s decision to expand early voting by a week with the aim of easing crowding at polling locations. Meanwhile, federal election money is pouring into Texas — a sign that both parties see a competitive presidential race in our state for the first time in years. That means Texans will see many more campaign ads in the final weeks before November 3, but they may not see another presidential debate. Read the latest in this week’s Texas election roundup post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

The League of Women Voters hosted a virtual event this week on the importance of learning about down-ballot races and how they impact you. Panelists for the event included ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, who described how education is on the ballot from your choice of president, who appoints the U.S. Secretary or Education, all the way down to your school board. Watch the event here.

Raise Your Hand Texas has additional “For the Future” candidate forums taking place next week, where you can learn more about candidates’ stances on public education issues. Click here for details.

Find additional general election voting dates and reminders here, and don’t forget to check out our candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote.


FEDERAL UPDATE: Congressional negotiations on a comprehensive COVID-19 relief bill came to an abrupt halt Tuesday afternoon when President Trump tweeted out, “I have instructed my representatives to stop negotiating until after the election…” The following day, after sharp declines in the stock market caused by his initial tweet, the President reversed course in part by calling for a handful of piecemeal bills. None of these standalone measures favored by the president and Senate Republicans would include relief funding for public education. Stay tuned for updates as the back-and-forth in Washington continues.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos continues to advance a pro-private school voucher agenda in meetings and events around the country. Voucher provisions have also been included in some of the Senate’s recent proposals for additional COVID-19 relief funding. At an event in Wisconsin yesterday moderated by the DeVos-associated “American Federation of Children,” parents complained that their income levels were too high to take advantage of voucher program in that state and argued that income caps should be abolished. Wisconsin already has 43,000 students enrolled in private schools with the assistance of vouchers, and 16,000 students in that state attend charter schools. DeVos and the U.S. Department of Education have also been pushing for the expansion of charter schools, with $33 million in grants announced last Friday for the state of Texas to grow its network of charter schools. Read more in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today, Oct. 9, 2020, voting to allow lifetime Legacy Master Teacher certificates. ATPE initiated the action on the Legacy Master Teacher issue by bringing it to SBEC members after hearing concerns from the field. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier also testified against a proposal to allow email notifications of disciplinary investigations against educators, rather than certified and registered mail that is currently required. Read more about the meeting in this post by Chevalier.


 

 

 

Highlights of the Oct. 9 SBEC meeting

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today to take up several agenda items, including final adoption of a new, ATPE-supported rule that will eliminate the expiration date of the Legacy Master Teacher certificates. ATPE testified against another proposal that would lower the security and reliability of discipline-related communications made by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to educators.

Highlights:

  • Final approval of Legacy Master Teacher lifetime certificates sends the proposal to the SBOE.
  • Extension of the EdTPA pilot into a third year.
  • Positive discussion of adding K-12 representatives, including ATPE, to advisory committee.
  • Board cautiously moves forward with discussion of discipline-related email communications to educators.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified against a discussion-only proposal that would substitute email for certified and regular mail methods of communications used by TEA during the disciplinary process. TEA justified the change by citing that email is more modern and will save the agency money. Chevalier argued that disciplinary communications carry deadlines and serious consequences for educators and their careers, making it inappropriate to use email, which is not federally protected like regular mail, can be impacted by spam filters and hackers, and does not have a reliable proof of receipt mechanism, unlike certified and registered mail. Chevalier said the change would open the door to litigation by educators who feel their due process rights have been violated. Read Chevalier’s written testimony here and view her oral testimony here (at the 2:00:00 mark).

After a lengthy process initiated by ATPE last year, the board unanimously adopted new language that will effectively transition the Legacy Master Teacher certificate into a lifetime certificate. After being reviewed at the November State Board of Education (SBOE) meeting, the changes are expected to take effect at the end of December 2020. TEA has stated that they will reach out to all impacted educators. Read our written testimony in support of this change here.

Items adopted by the board:

  • The four-year rule review of 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 234, which provides requirements relating to certification and preparation for members of the military community.
  • Changes to the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP) allowing EPPs to be “Not Rated: State of Disaster” for 2019-20, include a third indicator accounting for student achievement, provide an index system that combines the five performance indicators into an index for purposes of accreditation, and update the ASEP manual.
  • Changes to the assignment rules to update references to “legacy” master teacher certificates and to incorporate course changes approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) such as ethnic studies and the consolidation of CTE and Technology Applications courses.
  • The five-year continuing approval of 16 EPPs based on the results of their 2019–20 reviews.
  • The extension of the edTPA performance assessment pilot period for an additional, third year during which new pilot participants can be admitted.
  • The approval of these SBEC meetings dates in 2021:
    • February 12, 2021
    • April 30, 2021
    • July 23, 2021
    • October 1, 2021
    • December 10, 2021

Items discussed by the board:

  • Proposed amendments regarding how individuals licensed in other states may obtain a standard Texas educator certificate, providing for a temporary one-year certificate in certain cases.
  • TEA staff provided an update on the Science of Teaching Reading (STR) examination requirement transition, stating that only 70 out of 122 EPPs that offer STR-impacted certification areas have submitted attestations that they are able and ready to prepare candidates for the new STR exam requirements beginning January 1, 2021. Test development for new certification areas such as Special Education EC-6 and DeafBlind will be discussed at a future meeting.
  • TEA staff also discussed a proposal to change the composition of the Educator Preparation Advisory Committee (EPAC), the only standing committee that advises on SBEC matters, to include more K-12 representation in addition to EPPs. The proposal includes a provision calling for a representative from ATPE to be included on the committee.

At the end of the meeting, newly appointed board member Julia Dvorak requested that a special work session be convened to look at administrative rules on contract abandonment and equity in contract abandonment.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 28, 2020

Back-to-school is in full gear for more districts across Texas, while others will not begin until after Labor Day. Whether you’re back in class or still getting ready to meet your new students,  check out this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released official correspondence this week detailing the new COVID-19 case reporting requirements for on-campus students, staff, and teachers in schools. Weekly public reporting of the data on the Department of State Health Services website is expected to start at the end of September. TEA also updated several of its resources this week, including a language change on how districts should determine confirmed COVID-19 cases. For more detail, read ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier’s blog post.

ATPE’s COVID-19 FAQs and Resources page is always a good resource for educators looking for commonly asked questions and answers that our Member Legal Services team facilitates. Some topics have even been recorded as extremely informative webcasts – catch our educator rights webcast here and our more recent webcast on leave options and disability accommodations here. ATPE members can also use Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials . Don’t forget to take our survey on parent-teacher collaboration!


ELECTION UPDATE:  The race to fill Texas Senate District 30 heated up this week with three candidates making announcements that they plan to vie for the seat. The deadline to file is 5 p.m. today, Aug. 28.  If you live in this northeast Texas district, be sure to stay abreast of the news and get ready to vote in the special election on September 29! In other news, U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy provided testimony before Congress this week, defending his decisions impacting the speed and reliability of the USPS during a critical election year. Read more about these developments in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


School choice is emerging as a top talking point as the presidential election nears. The Trump campaign and numerous speakers at the Republican National Convention touted school choice this week, some even echoing the dubious statement that school choice is the “civil rights” issue of our time. While Trump says he will push for a national school voucher program, Biden makes clear that he opposes diverting public dollars from public neighborhood schools to private institutions. Read more about ATPE’s stance on the privatization of public education in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


ATPE launched a new COVID-19 timeline this week that includes top events related to the pandemic and Texas education, from the federal level all the way down to certain school districts. The events start in early March and conveniently link to news articles and blog posts here on Teach the Vote. Read more about the timeline in this blog post by ATPE staff.

 


Laura Yeager

Public education advocate and parent Laura Yeager contributed a guest post to Teach the Vote this week on the importance of reliable and consistent funding for public schools. Even with the cost of education rising during the pandemic (think more PPE, cleaning, devices, etc.), districts will only be held harmless for drops in attendance for the first 12 weeks of this school year. A lack of consistent funding after this “COVID-19 cliff” puts our public schools and the communities they serve at great risk.


This week ATPE submitted public comments on proposed rules that would eliminate the expiration date on “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. The State Board for Educator Certification’s (SBEC) proposed rules would fix the unintended consequences of last year’s House Bill 3, which have put some educators’ teaching assignments in jeopardy. Read more about the issue in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

ATPE supports lifetime Legacy Master Teacher certificates

Today, August 26, 2020, ATPE submitted public comments to the Texas Education Agency and the State Board of Education (SBEC) in support of a proposed rule change that would help Legacy Master Teachers (formerly “Master Teachers”) maintain their teaching positions.

As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, House Bill (HB) 3 of the 87th Texas legislature eliminated the ability of SBEC to issue or renew the Master Teacher (MT) certificates. In February, Chairman Huberty (R-Kingwood), author of HB 3, notified SBEC that this change was intended only to avoid confusion with the bill’s “master” teacher designations and was not meant to harm the employment of Master Teacher certificate holders. SBEC swiftly took action, requesting that TEA draft a rule to fix the issue.

The proposed rules are open for public comment through September 21. If approved at the October SBEC meeting and subsequent November SBOE meeting, the rules will effectively transition Legacy Master Teachers into lifetime certificate status. The rule update will allow Legacy Master Teachers to keep and/or obtain teaching assignments that require the Legacy Master Teacher certificate. If you are a Legacy Master Teacher or have a stake in the issue, submit a comment here!

Master Teacher rule fix opens for public comment

After months of advocacy by ATPE, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) tentatively agreed upon a proposed rule that will eliminate the expiration date of “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates, allowing certificate holders to maintain their teaching assignments obtained by virtue of their Master Teacher certificate. This proposed rule opens for public comment today, August 21, through September 21, 2020. If you’re interested or have a stake in the issue, please share your voice! Find the public comment notice and link to submit a comment here.

Here’s some history on the topic and advocacy ATPE has done:

The 86th Texas legislature passed House Bill (HB) 3, an enormous school finance package that provided billions in funding to public schools across the state. The bill created the Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA), a program designed to provide funding to districts tied to a teacher “designation” based on his or her performance. The highest designation under this program was labeled “Master Teacher.” In order to avoid confusion with existing certificates for Master Reading, Science, Math, and Technology Teachers, HB 3 repealed of the authorizing statutes for all the Master Teacher certificates.

That repeal took effect September 1, 2019. The implementation of the repeal meant that the SBEC could no longer issue or renew Master Teacher certificates and that the certificates would now be called “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. Master Teachers were faced with the prospect of losing both their certificate and their assignment. It was a tricky situation that needed to be solved.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies at the July SBEC meeting.

ATPE has advocated on behalf of Master Teachers over the past year to solve this issue. We have worked with TEA staff and SBEC board members and have provided testimony at the October 2019, December 2019, February 2020, May 2020, and July 2020 SBEC meetings in support of a fix. In January, we submitted public comment on the four-year rule review of the chapter in the Texas Administrative Code that formerly housed the Master Teacher certificate rules, imploring SBEC to take action.

ATPE also secured a letter from Chairman Dan Huberty that was delivered to SBEC members at the very moment ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier was testifying at the February 2020 SBEC meeting. The letter explained that the intent of the repeal was only to avoid confusion with the new and unrelated master teacher designation created by HB 3 as part of the TIA; the repeal was not meant to harm the employment prospects of current educators. In April, ATPE sent a letter letter to Gov. Greg Abbott expressing our appreciation for his interest in the issue.

Through these efforts, we have reached the final stages of fixing this unintended consequence for nearly 5,000 Texas educators. After public comment, the rule will be up for final adoption at the October SBEC meeting and, if approved, will also be reviewed by the State Board of Education. If ultimately approved, the rule is expected to take effect by the end of the 2020 calendar year.

SBEC holds special meeting to discuss educator preparation amid COVID-19

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today to discuss a special rule to address educator preparation amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The board met previously in June to discuss proposed rule text that would allow for virtual completion of field-based experiences and clinical experiences to satisfy educator preparation requirements. The proposed rule text limited these provisions to the 2020-21 school year and limited the virtual observations to synchronous environments (where the observer must be in the virtual classroom with the student teacher for live instruction).

This proposal was met with concern from educator preparation programs (EPPs), whose representatives expressed that many school districts are planning to use both synchronous and asynchronous learning models, while others are still deciding. Furthermore, EPPs are unsure of how districts will handle visitor policies, which could impact field supervisors’ ability to observe candidates. Other voiced concerns included obtaining the media releases necessary for student faces to be included on video used by educator candidates as they meet their program requirements. ATPE participated in a stakeholder workgroup with Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff as they worked through these concerns in preparation for today’s meeting, taking the position that high-quality clinical experiences are essential for educator preparation and that any changes made to allow virtual experiences should be time-limited.

TEA staff presented the following alternative rule language to address EPP concerns, which was approved by the board:

This new rule text adopted by SBEC today will provide increased flexibility for educator candidates as EPPs work with districts. The changes are still limited to the 2020-21 school year. TEA staff said they will work with EPPs to ensure that virtual experiences for candidates are as high-quality as possible, expressing their belief that other flexibility for educator preparation is not necessary at this time.

The next regularly scheduled SBEC meeting will take place on October 9, 2020.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: July 24, 2020

With the start of school just around the corner, it’s been another busy week for ATPE and the education community. Read about this week’s developments below from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: ATPE’s incoming State Vice President Karen Hames and Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell spoke on CNN’s Chris Cuomo Prime Time show Thursday night, July 23, to contribute their perspectives on school reopening. Hames and Mitchell stressed that teachers care about their kids and want to be in school with them, but that educators have concerns about being exposed to the coronavirus in a classroom setting. Hames shared reasons why school choice would not provide any real solutions to parents’ concerns about COVID-19, and Mitchell emphasized the need for additional federal funding and better guidance at the state level to help school districts prepare for reopening amid the pandemic. Watch video of the CNN segment here.

In other news related to COVID-19, the University Interscholastic League (UIL) released a long-awaited announcement this week that delays the schedules of 5A-6A conferences. Additionally, UIL shares that marching band practice in all conferences may not begin until September 7, 2020. Updates to TEA’s COVID-19 Support and Guidance Page this week included a new summary of the agency’s reopening guidance, several new “Strong Start” resources, and new CARES Act and attendance and enrollment information.

Visit the ATPE COVID-19 FAQ and Resources page for constantly updated resources and answers to common questions from educators. ATPE members can also use Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials regarding school reopening and other issues.


This week, ATPE submitted formal public comments on the U.S. Department of Education’s (ED) interim final rule directing how districts spend their CARES Act federal emergency dollars on equitable services for students in private schools. The interim final rule, effective July 1, 2020, is estimated to cause public school districts to spend over $44 million of their Title I-derived emergency funds on private school students regardless of poverty — more than $38 million more than they would normally spend under the longstanding interpretation of equitable services in federal law. ATPE’s comments urge the department to rescind its inequitable and distorted interpretation of the CARES Act, which goes against congressional intent. Over 5,200 comments have been submitted, but the department is not required to respond to them because of the emergency rulemaking process. Read more about the new federal rule in this recent Teach the Vote blog post. Read ATPE’s public comments here.


ELECTION UPDATE: Last week saw one of the most unusual elections in recent memory: A runoff postponed due to a global pandemic that proceeded to intensify in Texas as the new election date approached. Early voting was expanded from the usual one week to two weeks in order to reduce the load on polling locations. Some voters also took advantage of alternative methods of casting their ballots to avoid contracting COVID-19 at the polls, although Texas broke ranks with other parts of the country by refusing to expand the ability to vote by mail amid the pandemic. Despite the failure of lawsuits aimed at expanding mail-in ballot options, Texas saw a substantial increase in mail-in voting during this runoff election, which caused official results to be delayed by a few days but did not result in changes to any of the unofficial race outcomes revealed on election night. The July 14 election also exposed troubling voting issues that will have to be corrected before the November election.

With double the time to vote early, this month’s runoffs saw double the turnout over the primary runoff elections in 2018, 6.61% to 3.22%, respectively. After all of the debate over voting by mail, 30% of Democrats and 24% of Republicans who voted early cast their ballots by mail. That’s actually down from 36% of all early voters who cast mail-in ballots in the 2018 runoffs. Democrats had a huge turnout — nearly 956,000 voted in the primary runoffs, but comparable statewide numbers aren’t available for Republican turnout because there wasn’t a statewide GOP runoff like there was on the Democrats’ ballot. Party turnout in primary elections is not always an accurate predictor of turnout in the general election. But based on the turnout for a runoff election in July, in the Texas heat, in the middle of a deadly pandemic, it’s probably safe to assume that overall turnout for the November general election will be enormous. That makes researching candidates and making your voting plan for November more important than ever! See more election results in last week’s recap by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


CONGRESSIONAL UPDATE: The U.S. House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education met Thursday, July 23, for a hearing on the safe reopening of schools. The discussion bounced back and forth between the health risks for children and health risks for teachers and staff, with implications across the board for future funding to get schools on the path to a safe reopening. Get the full rundown on the meeting in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

While a proposal for additional federal emergency aid (dubbed the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions or “HEROES” Act) was approved by the U.S. House several weeks ago, the U.S. Senate has now agreed on its own $105 billion aid package for education, which includes $70 billion for K-12 schools. The proposal would tie the K-12 funding to in-person instruction by sending $35 billion to schools that open for in-person instruction and splitting the remaining $35 billion among all schools, regardless of their method of instruction. The $30 billion for colleges will not be tied to in-person instruction, and governors will receive the last $5 billion to spend on either K-12 or higher education. The details of the proposal are expected to be made public on Monday.



After a week-long delay, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released updated guidance for the reopening of public schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. The brunt of the new guidance issued last night, July 23, consists of justifying the push to reopen schools for in-person instruction. New items include recommending that schools group students and teachers into isolated cohorts or “pods” meant to limit in-person contact. There is also a checklist intended to assist parents in deciding  whether to send their children to school. A new mask guidance document suggests masks can be worn by anyone older than two years old, though some groups of students may need special adaptations and alternatives. Even as the guidance encourages reopening, it urges caution to those considering to do so in areas of substantial, uncontrolled transmission. Furthermore, the guidance recommends tying operational decisions to local epidemiological conditions. The guidance states as follows:

“Schools should be prepared for COVID-19 cases and exposure to occur in their facilities. Collaborating with local health officials will continue to be important once students are back to school, as they can provide regular updates about the status of COVID-19 in the community and help support and maintain the health and wellbeing of students, teachers, and staff.”

All of the CDC guidance documents, including the latest guidance as well as recommendations dating back to May, can be found here.


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today, July 24, to take action on several items implementing the Science of Teaching Reading exam requirements from last year’s House Bill (HB) 3 and to discuss COVID-19 considerations related to certification. Additionally, the board approved a proposal to transition Legacy Master Teacher certificate holders into lifetime certificates, as HB 3 barred the Master Teacher certificate from being issued or renewed. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified before SBEC in support of this proposal, continuing our months-long advocacy for a fix for Master Teachers. Read more about today’s SBEC meeting in this blog post from Chevalier and read the written testimony here.


SCHOOL FINANCE UPDATE: Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar created buzz this week with the release of his certification revenue estimate, which shows that the state faces a $4.6 billion deficit due to both COVID-19 and the largest drop in oil prices in decades. While some revenue sources have helped to soften the blow, including federal coronavirus aid and new revenue from online commerce, the uncertainties ahead will make the state budget lawmakers’ top concern in the upcoming 2021 legislative session. Read more about the revenue esimate and Hegar’s interview with the Texas Tribune this week in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.  

In other school finance news, Just Fund It, a non-partisan group of parents, students, and community members across Texas advocating for increased public school funding, has begun a petition aimed at urging Gov. Abbott to ensure stable and predictable school funding. Specifically, the petition asks the governor to extend the 12-week “hold harmless” period for calculating funding based on attendance as recently announced by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) for the coming school year. The group presents a compelling argument for extending the hold harmless to cover the entire 2020-21 school year.

Summary of July 24 SBEC meeting

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today, July 24, 2020, to take up a lengthy agenda, including the adoption of five items related to the implementation of the Science of Teaching Reading and a proposed fix for expiring Legacy Master Teacher certificates.

Highlights:

  • SBEC approved an ATPE-backed proposal to eliminate the expiration date of Legacy Master Teacher certificates, which were barred from being newly issued or renewed by last year’s House Bill (HB) 3.
  • The board adopted rules to implement science of teaching reading requirements of HB 3, including new testing requirements and replacement certificates for PK-6.
  • Two new non-voting members joined the board: Emily Garcia, Executive Director of Urban Teachers in Dallas replaced Carlos Villagrana as the alternative certification program representative. Dr. Edward Hill is replaced by Dr. Alma Rodriguez, Dean of the College of Education at the University of Texas- Rio Grande Valley in Brownsville. Both new members were former public school teachers and administrators.
  • SBEC will meet again next Friday, July 31, to discuss special rules regarding COVID-19 and educator candidates and will likely hear from many educator preparation stakeholders who want flexibility for their programs amid an ever-changing landscape of pandemic policies and practices.

Legacy Master Teachers

Chevalier testifies at SBEC meeting, July 24, 2020.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified today in support of a proposal to create two new rules that would eliminate the expiration date on Legacy Master Teacher (LMT) certificates and make these certificates exempt from renewal requirements. The rules would apply to valid LMT certificates and LMT certificates that expired on or after September 1, 2019.

This transition to a lifetime certificate will solve the unintended consequences of House Bill (HB) 3, which barred the Master Teacher certificates from being issued or renewed after September 1, 2019. This change has left some teachers unable to continue in their current teaching assignments once their LMT certificate expires. ATPE pushed the board for several months to take action on this issue, even requesting a letter of legislative intent from House Public Education Committee chairman and HB 3 author Dan Huberty.

Read Chevalier’s written testimony in support of the new rules here and see video of her oral testimony at 4:00:00 here. The board approved the proposal, which will be published in the Texas Register for public comment from August 21 to September 21, 2020. The proposal will then be up for final adoption at the October SBEC meeting and then subject to review by the State Board of Education. If all approval processes are finalized, the effective date of this proposal would be December 27, 2020, and the Texas Education Agency (TEA) has said it will do outreach over the winter break to make sure LMTs are aware of the change.

Coronavirus Update

Gov. Greg Abbott has provided flexibility through suspensions of statutes and rules that allowed Spring 2020 certification candidates to spend less time on face-to-face requirements, allowed candidates who weren’t able to test but who had completed all preparation requirements to receive a one year probationary certificate, and allowed for those have yet to pass the content pedagogy test to obtain a one-year intern certificate (only issuable prior to October 1). Other changes have allowed extension of a one-year emergency permit for candidates who are unable to test, and the state suspended requirements that internships, practicums, and clinical teaching experiences must occur in actual school settings rather than virtual ones. Witnesses testifying today echoed public comment provided at the beginning of the SBEC meeting, expressing that school district plans are extremely varied in terms of start dates, instructional settings, learning plans, and visitor policies, which makes it difficult to place student teachers and help students meet their preparation requirements. Next Friday, July 31, the board will consider specific rulemaking related to further COVID-19 considerations for educator preparation.

Science of Teaching Reading

SBEC adopted several agenda items today that implement the new science of teaching reading (STR) requirements of HB 3. Every teacher candidate issued a standard certificate after January 1, 2021, must take a stand-alone STR certification exam if they plan to earn a certificate in Early Childhood (EC): PK-3, Core Subjects: EC-6, Core Subjects: 4-8, English Language Arts and Reading: Grades 4–8, English Language Arts and Reading/Social Studies: Grades 4–8. These certificates (except for EC: PK-3) will be replaced after December 31, 2020, with new certificates that incorporate science of teaching reading into their name, standards, and testing requirements. Replacement certification exams are also being developed so that content within the STR is not duplicatively tested. Additionally, through August 2021, the STR exam requirement implementation will be pass/fail while curriculum is refined and details are being worked out. Starting September 6, 2021, a scaled score for the STR will be implemented. See below for the operational dates of the new tests.

Today’s adopted rules implement the STR change by updating the pre-admission content test requirements, adding an approval process for educator preparation programs (EPPs) to be able to offer the replacement certificates, adding the replacement certificates to the categories of classroom teaching certificates, updating exam requirements for the replacement certificates, and reorganizing the STR standards in rule to apply to all EC-6 educators.

TEA also provided an update to SBEC members on test development and its communication strategy with the field and candidates. An STR exam preparation manual is expected to be available September 2020. A TExES in Focus: Science of Teaching Reading (293) Webinar was held July 16, and it will be posted soon on the TEA website. TEA also plans to hold a deep-dive webinar series on the changes. EPPs must attest by December 15, 2020, to their ability and readiness to prepare candidates for the STR-impacted fields.

Other Adopted Rules

SBEC adopted several changes to rules regarding educator preparation requirements, including guidance to programs that are closing or consolidating; a requirement that EPPs that are closing publish in writing a formal exit or dismissal policy; additions to curriculum to align with the mental health, abuse, and suicide requirements of House Bill 18 (86th Texas legislature); alignment to board standards of the 150 clock hours of coursework and training prior to clinical teaching or internship; clarifications on certificate deactivations; guidance about summer practicums; guidance for programs and candidates who need to finish their practicum out-of-state and out-of-country; and guidance about test approval for completers from prior years who return to their program later on to test.

The board also adopted into rule new standards for bilingual Spanish, EC-6 and EC-12 special education, and deafblind certification areas and removed the one-year expiration date on passing PACT to give candidates more time to be admitted to a program if they have a passing score on a PACT exam that is more than a year old.

Proposed Changes

The board approved the proposed mandatory four-year rule review for 19 TAC Chapter 234, which relates to preparation, testing, certification, and renewal requirements for military service members, military spouses, and military veterans.

SBEC also discussed proposals for the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP), including the “Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster” accreditation status for EPPs due to Abbott’s disaster declaration. Additionally, data for 2019-20 will be reported only, and candidates who were issued a probationary certificate under Abbott’s COVID-19 waivers will be excluded from ASEP pass rates for the 2020-21 school year. TEA also proposed an ASEP index, which combines the five ASEP indicators to create an overall “index” or score for EPPs. The five indicators are PPR/non-PPR pass rates, principal surveys, student growth, observation frequency and quality, and new teacher surveys. Each of these indicators will be weighted to create the index, with the PPR/non-PPR pass rates having the greatest weight. For the 2020-21 year, EPPs’ status will be the more favorable outcome of the index versus the current system. The proposed rule also contains an updated to say that if an EPP is under a board order, they aren’t eligible for a commendation.

A model for the student growth indicator of the ASEP system was also proposed today, which will assign points to beginning teachers of record in their first three years based on their students’ growth on standardized testing. These points will be attributed to the beginning teachers’ EPPs and incorporated into those programs’ ASEP scores. Earliest is Spring 2024 before this indicator could become implemented, due to uncertainties regarding testing during the pandemic.

The board also approved proposed updates to the SBEC rule chapter that designates which certificates are appropriate for certain teaching assignments (19 TAC Chapter 231). This includes changing “Master Teacher” to “Legacy Master Teacher” and updates to incorporate assignments for new SBOE-approved courses, such as English Language Development Acquisition, African American studies, and energy cluster courses (Oil and Gas Production).

Discussion Only Items

The first year of the EdTPA pilot program included 27 EPPs — 16 institutions of higher education (IHE) and 11 alternative certification programs (ACP). Over 450 candidates have submitted portfolios. The second year of the pilot will include 35 EPPs (19 IHEs, and 16 ACPs). SBEC members discussed the fact that the state of Georgia has eliminated its EdTPA requirements, while two other state legislatures have discussed eliminating EdTPA from their state frameworks. Researchers from Sam Houston State University will provide an update on their T-TESS pilot, which aims to explore an alternative to EdTPA, at the October SBEC meeting.

The board is set to meet again next Friday, July 31. Subsequent meetings this year are set for October 9 and December 11, 2020.

SBEC meets to discuss COVID-19 considerations for certification candidates

SBEC holds a special virtual meeting, June 11, 2020.

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met off their normal schedule today to discuss a new coronavirus-inspired rule regarding face-to-face requirements for certification candidates in educator preparation programs. View the agenda from today’s SBEC meeting here.

Candidates in educator preparation programs complete experiences such as internships, clinical teaching, practicums, and field-based experiences that involve face-to-face interactions with teachers, students, and observers. These experiences are crucial for candidates to practice pedagogical skills and get real exposure to what school environments are like, including the many unexpected aspects of daily life as an educator. The COVID-19 pandemic made these in-person experiences unsafe and impractical, which prompted the issuance of waivers from the governor’s office this spring.

Current waivers for educator candidate experiences during the pandemic only impact candidates who are completing experiences in 2019-20 and for candidates who are beginning such experiences in 2020-21. The waivers will stay in effect only as long as Gov. Greg Abbott’s disaster declaration is in place. For this reason, SBEC board members met today to consider a new rule today that would effectively allow for virtual practices with regard to certification candidate experiences. This unique provision would be limited to the 2020-21 academic year and would expire with no additional action by the board.

The rule discussed by the board today specifically states that “for the 2020-2021 academic year, actual school settings and authentic school settings may include campuses with a traditional, in-person setting that are temporarily functioning in a virtual setting and face-to-face settings for observations may include synchronous virtual settings.” With this change, internships, clinical teaching experiences, field-based experiences, teacher observations, and practicums could take place in a virtual setting during the upcoming academic year. Referring to synchronous virtual settings, the rule allows for observations to take place in which the candidate and observer are both in a virtual classroom setting at the same time, rather than the observer being able to watch a video of the educator after the fact (asynchronous).

Two representatives from the University of Texas at Austin, Dr. Jill Marshall and Dr. Michael Marder, testified today about how the changes would impact their educator preparation programs. Dr. Marshall expressed support for the proposal, but she also voiced concerns with synchronous observations and related issues such as school district permissions, student privacy, and inequitable candidate access to technology. Dr. Marder echoed Dr. Marshall’s concerns, expressing that both asynchronous and synchronous video would better serve students and suggesting alternative rule language for the board to consider. Staff of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) indicated that the inclusion of the word “synchronous” was meant to mirror the current face-to-face requirements of teacher observation, and the board did not make any changes to the proposed rule text.

SBEC voted to approve the proposed rule amendment today, which will now be posted in the Texas Register and available for public comment from June 26 to July 27, 2020. On July 31, the board will meet again to review the rule and, if finally approved, the rule will take effect Oct. 15, 2020.

During today’s virtual meeting, the board also introduced its two new members recently appointed by Gov. Abbott, Julia Dvorak (formerly Julia Moore) and Jean Streepey. As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, Streepey is a middle school math teacher in Highland Park ISD (Dallas). Dvorak of Pflugerville is a consultant who works for a lobby and public relations firm that has represented organizations and candidates advocating for private school vouchers.

The next regularly scheduled SBEC meeting is set for July 24, 2020. For more information on the coronavirus pandemic, be sure to check out ATPE’s Coronavirus FAQ and Resources page.