Category Archives: certification

ATPE supports lifetime Legacy Master Teacher certificates

Today, August 26, 2020, ATPE submitted public comments to the Texas Education Agency and the State Board of Education (SBEC) in support of a proposed rule change that would help Legacy Master Teachers (formerly “Master Teachers”) maintain their teaching positions.

As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, House Bill (HB) 3 of the 87th Texas legislature eliminated the ability of SBEC to issue or renew the Master Teacher (MT) certificates. In February, Chairman Huberty (R-Kingwood), author of HB 3, notified SBEC that this change was intended only to avoid confusion with the bill’s “master” teacher designations and was not meant to harm the employment of Master Teacher certificate holders. SBEC swiftly took action, requesting that TEA draft a rule to fix the issue.

The proposed rules are open for public comment through September 21. If approved at the October SBEC meeting and subsequent November SBOE meeting, the rules will effectively transition Legacy Master Teachers into lifetime certificate status. The rule update will allow Legacy Master Teachers to keep and/or obtain teaching assignments that require the Legacy Master Teacher certificate. If you are a Legacy Master Teacher or have a stake in the issue, submit a comment here!

Master Teacher rule fix opens for public comment

After months of advocacy by ATPE, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) tentatively agreed upon a proposed rule that will eliminate the expiration date of “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates, allowing certificate holders to maintain their teaching assignments obtained by virtue of their Master Teacher certificate. This proposed rule opens for public comment today, August 21, through September 21, 2020. If you’re interested or have a stake in the issue, please share your voice! Find the public comment notice and link to submit a comment here.

Here’s some history on the topic and advocacy ATPE has done:

The 86th Texas legislature passed House Bill (HB) 3, an enormous school finance package that provided billions in funding to public schools across the state. The bill created the Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA), a program designed to provide funding to districts tied to a teacher “designation” based on his or her performance. The highest designation under this program was labeled “Master Teacher.” In order to avoid confusion with existing certificates for Master Reading, Science, Math, and Technology Teachers, HB 3 repealed of the authorizing statutes for all the Master Teacher certificates.

That repeal took effect September 1, 2019. The implementation of the repeal meant that the SBEC could no longer issue or renew Master Teacher certificates and that the certificates would now be called “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. Master Teachers were faced with the prospect of losing both their certificate and their assignment. It was a tricky situation that needed to be solved.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies at the July SBEC meeting.

ATPE has advocated on behalf of Master Teachers over the past year to solve this issue. We have worked with TEA staff and SBEC board members and have provided testimony at the October 2019, December 2019, February 2020, May 2020, and July 2020 SBEC meetings in support of a fix. In January, we submitted public comment on the four-year rule review of the chapter in the Texas Administrative Code that formerly housed the Master Teacher certificate rules, imploring SBEC to take action.

ATPE also secured a letter from Chairman Dan Huberty that was delivered to SBEC members at the very moment ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier was testifying at the February 2020 SBEC meeting. The letter explained that the intent of the repeal was only to avoid confusion with the new and unrelated master teacher designation created by HB 3 as part of the TIA; the repeal was not meant to harm the employment prospects of current educators. In April, ATPE sent a letter letter to Gov. Greg Abbott expressing our appreciation for his interest in the issue.

Through these efforts, we have reached the final stages of fixing this unintended consequence for nearly 5,000 Texas educators. After public comment, the rule will be up for final adoption at the October SBEC meeting and, if approved, will also be reviewed by the State Board of Education. If ultimately approved, the rule is expected to take effect by the end of the 2020 calendar year.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: June 12, 2020

You have until Monday, June 15, to register to vote in the July 14 primary runoff election (and a special election if you happen to live in Texas Senate District 14). While you are making your voting plan for the July election, check out this week’s education news from ATPE Governmental Relations.


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: Phase three to reopen Texas is well underway, with restaurants allowed to expand capacity to 75% starting today. By next Friday, amusement parks and carnivals in counties with more than 1,000 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 may open at 50% capacity. Gov. Greg Abbott spoke with CBS Austin this week and noted that, with cases on the rise, his contingency plan should there be a resurgence will be to first roll back non-essential surgeries and other medical procedures.

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) updated quite a few coronavirus-related web resources this week. TEA’s closure support and guidance page includes updates on personal protective equipment and other safety guidance for summer school, graduation, and UIL. Information on residential programs has been updated on the special education page. TEA also provided an updated COVID-19 waivers document.

Changes were also announced this week that will impact educator certification candidates who are beginning internship requirements but have not taken their test and candidates who are required to complete otherwise face-to-face educator preparation program (EPP) requirements in the 2020-21 school year. Specifically, eligible candidates who are beginning internships will be able to obtain an intern certificate upon recommendation of their EPP, without having to meet testing requirements first. (Fingerprinting requirements remain in place.) This is similar to a previous waiver that allowed certification candidates who had completed all EPP requirements except their test to obtain a probationary certificate. Candidates who would otherwise be expected to complete face-to-face requirements such as clinical teaching will be able to meet these in a virtual setting. Read more here and find more information below about similar developments at the State Board for Educator Certification this week.

As always, ATPE’s Coronavirus FAQ and Resources page is being frequently updated with the latest information on COVID-19 issues for educators.


ELECTION UPDATE: It’s almost election time again! The deadline to register to vote in the July 14 runoff election (and a Texas Senate District 14 special election happening the same day) is Monday, June 15, 2020. For more on registration and why this election is important, check out this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Make sure you’re registered and learn what’s on your ballot here. View candidate profiles, including their ATPE survey responses and voting records, on Teach the Vote here. If you feel you meet the eligibility criteria to vote by mail, your application for a mail-in ballot must be received by your local election administration (not postmarked) no later than July 2. Find additional information about voter registration from the League of Women Voters here, plus get election reminders and other resources from the Texas Educators Vote coalition here. Early voting begins June 29!


FEDERAL UPDATE: Facing the unprecedented threat of the deadly novel coronavirus, Congress entered the spring of 2020 with what has become an extremely rare sense of bipartisan purpose, passing four large legislative packages to provide funding for hospitals and health care workers fighting the virus, as well as for businesses and individuals affected by the closures and stay-at-home orders implemented to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The federal CARES Act provided $30 billion for the U.S. Department of Education, including $13.5 billion for elementary and secondary education formula funding to be provided directly to states.

David Pore

ATPE has been tirelessly lobbying Congress to enact laws and policies that protect your ability to effectively educate students and retire with financial security. That includes fighting to repeal the arbitrary Social Security offsets that unfairly reduce the retirement benefits of educators. Read more about how ATPE is advocating for you in Washington, D.C. in this update from ATPE’s federal lobbyist, David Pore, as published in the ATPE News Summer 2020 edition.

 


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) held a special meeting this week to consider a new rule that will allow more flexibility for educator certification candidates undergoing face-to-face requirements such as internships, field experiences, clinical experiences, practicums, and observations. The changes will be limited to the 2020-21 school year and will allow for at least partial completion of these requirements in a virtual setting. Read more about yesterday’s SBEC meeting and the proposed rule language in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


A recent study by researchers at Princeton and Tufts Universities finds that “teachers are people too,” when it comes to racial biases. In the peer-reviewed study published in the prestigious journal Educational Researcher in April 2020, the authors found that teachers, while surely well-intentioned, are no different in their levels of implicit and explicit biases from non-teachers of the same race, level of education, age, gender, and political affiliation. This finding highlights the need for training and supports to help teachers work toward recognizing and combating biases that may negatively impact students. The study authors also point out that due to the progress we must make with respect to teacher racial bias, schools are not likely to be the great societal equalizers that so many conclude they are. Read more about the study here.

ATPE continues advocacy for Master Teacher fix

While it is not uncommon for Texas teaching certificates to come and go as they keep up with the needs of an evolving education system, the legislature’s abrupt decision in 2019 to eliminate prestigious Master Teacher certificates caught many by surprise. To address this issue, ATPE’s lobbyists have been working diligently with state leaders and officials to ensure that the expertise and value of Master Teacher certificate holders is upheld.

Under House Bill (HB) 3 passed by the 86th Texas legislature in 2019, Master Teacher certificates can no longer be issued or renewed, effective September 1, 2019. The bill also repealed the authorizing statutes for those Master Teacher certificates, which were offered in Reading, Mathematics, Science, and Technology, essentially wiping them from existence. Master Teacher certificate holders will now find their certificates marked with a “legacy” notation, as designated by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC).

This change has left many of our state’s nearly 5,000 Master Teachers perplexed as to the status of their certificates and their teaching assignment prospects. Once their Master Teacher certificate expires, will they be able to continue teaching in their current position? Take the popular Master Reading Teacher certificate as an example (82% of Master Teachers hold this certificate). First issued in 2001, this certificate was designed for those who wanted to go above and beyond – only obtainable by educators who had already been teaching on a standard certificate. Because the certificate is EC-12, in some cases it allows an educator to obtain a teaching assignment for which they wouldn’t otherwise be eligible if they held only their underlying standard certificate. Teachers in this situation who want to maintain their current assignments must either pay to take a test for earning an appropriate credential, request permission to remain in their assignment on an expired certificate, or find another job.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies before SBEC, Dec. 6, 2019

ATPE has been working with SBEC, the Texas Education Agency (TEA), members of the legislature, and state leaders to remedy this issue for several months. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier submitted written testimony at an SBEC meeting on October 4, 2019, written and oral testimony at the December 6, 2019 SBEC meeting, and written and oral testimony at the February 21, 2020 SBEC meeting. ATPE also submitted public comments on the rule review of Chapter 239, Student Services Certificates, which is where the original Master Teacher certificates were housed in the Texas Administrative Code.

These efforts have led to important developments, including a letter of intent being shared by House Public Education Committee chairman and HB 3 author Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) and a decision to add a discussion item to the agenda for an upcoming SBEC meeting on May 1, 2020, aimed at finding solutions to the Master Teacher issue. (The May 1 SBEC meeting starts at 8:30 a.m. and will be broadcast here. ATPE will also provide updates on the meeting here on our Teach the Vote blog.)

In unexpectedly dramatic fashion, Chairman Huberty’s letter in response to ATPE’s advocacy was delivered into SBEC members’ hands as ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier was delivering her testimony on the Master Teachers issue during the February SBEC meeting. The letter stated that the intent of the elimination of the Master Teacher certificates was to avoid naming confusion with the newly created “master teacher” designations under the state’s new Teacher Incentive Allotment, also included in HB 3.

“Our intent was never to abandon the expertise of these highly trained educators,” Huberty wrote in the letter. “Holders of legacy master teacher certificates should be entitled to maintain their existing assignments without interruption, additional cost, or the need to seek additional certifications.”

Responding to the requests from ATPE and the letter from Chairman Huberty, SBEC members voted to create a separate agenda item for the May SBEC meeting to discuss options for Master Teacher certificate holders. ATPE has also sent a letter letter to Gov. Greg Abbott expressing our appreciation for his interest in the issue.

Master Teacher certificate holders underwent time-intensive, rigorous, and often costly educator preparation programs in order to receive this extra credential. Their roles are content-specific and include teacher mentoring duties as they support the other professionals on their campus. Master Teachers are also highly educated, with 67% having either a master’s or doctorate degree. In many cases, the Master Teacher certificates (especially the Master Reading Teacher certificate) are highly prized, and at least in the early days of the certificate, were accompanied by stipends. Furthermore, Master Reading Teachers’ focus on literacy is crucial to the reading success of the state and is directly related to many of the aims of HB 3.

As this issue progresses, ATPE will continue to work carefully to preserve the hard work and expertise of Master Teacher certificate holders and share updates here on our advocacy blog.

Texas educator preparation and testing in viral limbo

Uncertainty around educator preparation and testing in Texas during the novel coronavirus pandemic has left some aspiring and current educators wondering, “What’s next?” In this Teach the Vote blog post, we will cover what we know so far about educator preparation and what questions we still need answered.

Certification Testing Changes

Last month, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) posted a notice of the cancellation of educator certification examinations slated for March 17 through April 16, 2020. Pearson’s Texas educator certification website provides further information for educators whose tests were cancelled, including a listing of closed testing centers. TEA similarly announced that Performance Assessment for School Leaders (PASL) submission deadlines were being extended, with additional information available on the ETS performance assessment website here.

Pearson VUE, which administers the computer-based certification tests, also has a coronavirus-dedicated webpage with specific FAQs and information about rescheduling of the tests. In particular, the site explains that educator certification candidates can reschedule tests for dates starting May 1, 2020, and beyond, but this is subject to further orders or virus-related restrictions that may be issued by state and federal leaders. When rescheduling an exam, candidates will only be able to select from available dates at testing centers that are open, and all candidates are advised to contact testing centers before their test to ensure availability.

Other Certification Requirements

On TEA’s coronavirus Texas educator support webpage, educators can find other information about changes due to the virus, including an educator preparation FAQ and presentation. Importantly, Gov. Greg Abbott has waived impractical requirements for candidates who were completing clinical teaching, an internship, or a practicum this spring. These include face-to-face observations for those in a practicum, clinical teaching requirements based in school settings, and field supervision for interns. Additionally, the governor waived the requirement that 15 clock-hours of a field-based experience be conducted on a school campus for those completing their field-based experience this spring or summer. Find more information about eligibility for the waivers in the FAQ and Guidance section posted here.

Gov. Abbott has also waived the requirement that first-year teachers complete surveys related to their educator preparation programs, as well as the corresponding surveys that principals fill out about first-year teachers’ preparedness. This will certainly impact the state’s Accountability System for Educator Preparation (ASEP), as will interruptions to testing and candidate preparation. It is likely that the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) will be revisiting its rules to make potential changes regarding educator preparation.

Many questions remain regarding the impact to educator preparation and testing, especially as current educators are renewing their contracts and aspiring educators are hoping to find jobs. TEA staff have indicated they are working on a new FAQ document, but its release date is unclear. As the situation develops, stay tuned to the Teach the Vote blog and follow the ATPE Governmental Relations team on Twitter. Be sure also to visit ATPE’s Coronavirus FAQ and Resources page for frequently updated information designed to help educators during the pandemic.

Texas enrollment in ed prep programs is up, completion is down

A new report released by the Center for American Progress, an independent, nonpartisan policy institute, provides an analysis of the enrollment and completion decline impacting educator preparation programs (EPPs) nationwide, as well as a special inside look at what California and Texas are doing to address this issue.

In Texas, more aspiring teachers are enrolling in EPPs but fewer candidates are completing them.

From 2010 to 2018, EPPs experienced a nationwide decline in enrollment and program completion. Despite this trend, Texas saw just under a 10 percent increase in enrollment from 2010 to 2018. This was due to massive gains in the non-IHE (institution of higher education) alternative certification industry, which grew by nearly 30,000 students.

Source: Center for American Progress.

Texas’s increase in enrollment was not met with a matched increase in completion. In fact, EPP completion in Texas declined more than 15 percent during the 2010-2018 time period. Furthermore, the percentage change from 2010 to 2018 in completion rates for non-IHE alternative programs is only slightly above 0%, which means that even though these programs enroll the most students, they are getting demonstrably worse at helping them reach the finish line.

The enrollment boom in Texas can be attributed to the largest non-IHE alternative certification program: Texas Teachers of Tomorrow, formerly known as A+ Texas Teachers. But enrollment and completion numbers simply don’t match up, according to the report. The authors point to the model of the for-profit Texas Teachers program, which requires a small fee upfront and then thousands of dollars from future paychecks. As noted in the report, the Texas Teachers program is entirely online and self-paced.

Source: Center for American Progress.

In contrast to Texas, California has experienced proportional declines in enrollment and completion across all program types. California has far fewer alternative certification programs and has implemented policies to improve teacher preparation and retention. These efforts include teaching residencies, a required state-approved induction program, stipends for teachers in high-needs schools, and university partnerships with STEM organizations and nonprofits to aid in the recruitment of math and science teachers.

These findings regarding educator preparation are crucial to keep in mind as we address teacher recruitment and retention in Texas, which has long been an ATPE legislative priority. Texas has incubated a pathway to teaching that despite its popularity may be associated with lower outcomes with respect to long-term employment opportunities, considering that teachers trained in alternative certification programs in Texas have a lower retention rate than those from traditional EPPs, at 65.8 percent compared to 75.2 percent according to the Texas Education Agency. The increased funding for teacher compensation in this year’s House Bill 3 was necessary for current teachers, but there is no pay raise that can turn an under-prepared teacher into an effective teacher. It remains important for Texas policymakers to ensure that new teachers are prepared to face the rigors of the classroom, whether they have chosen a traditional route to teaching or an alternative route in which so much of their training takes place online. Additionally, improving recruitment into traditional teacher training programs, which could start as early as high school, is a shift that must happen to generate a well-prepared, lasting educator workforce.

Here are some of the other highlights of the report regarding nationwide trends:

What is the extent of the 2010-2018 decline?

  • More than one-third fewer students enrolled in EPPs.
  • There was a 28 percent decline in program completion.

Is the decline consistent across race, gender, and academic discipline?

  • Male, and Black, Latinx, and indigenous teacher candidates experienced steeper enrollment declines.
  • Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and special education subjects experienced completion declines.

Were there any cases of increase in enrollment and/or completion, despite the overall decline?

  • Non-IHE alternative certification programs experienced an enrollment increase of 42 percent, which was driven mostly by Texas.
  • There was a 30 percent increase in completion for credentials relating to teaching English-language learners or bilingual education.

What policy recommendations can we take away from these findings?

  • The federal government should use Title II reporting to collect data that can be used to generate more specific information about the decline in order to target policy.
  • States should improve data collection and reporting on teacher supply and demand to develop specific solutions.
  • States should approach non-IHE alternative certification programs, and particularly those operating as for-profit programs, with a critical eye.

Summary of SBEC’s meeting on July 26, 2019

On Friday, July 26, 2019, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met in Austin to take up a lengthy agenda that included approving rules to implement the EdTPA pilot program and discussing implementation of bills passed by the 86th Legislature, such as House Bill (HB) 3.

First, a note about SBEC procedure. Each agenda item that makes changes to rules takes three board meetings to move through SBEC. The board first brings up an item for discussion only, then formally proposes the rule at its next meeting and allows for a public comment period, and then finally adopts the rule at the third meeting. Additionally, under state law all adopted SBEC rules are subject to review by the elected State Board of Education (SBOE), which can take no action or veto a rule.

On Friday, SBEC approved two standard four-year rule reviews. The review of Title 19 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 233, which establishes the certificate classes for classroom teachers (e.g. 4-8 Science, Music EC-12, etc.), and the review of 19 TAC Chapter 244, which outlines the qualifications, training, and acceptable criteria for educator appraisers, were approved.

The board also adopted items that will now make their way to SBOE, including revisions to the criteria that school districts use to assign teachers. The assignment rules are based on the certificates held by teachers, which sometimes change, and the rules must also reflect the addition of new courses, such as Ethnic Studies. For instance, someone with an 8-12 History certification could be assigned to teach a high school Ethnic Studies classroom. Also headed to the SBOE are revisions to the program requirements for educator preparation programs (EPPs) that would create an optional, intensive pre-service preparation and certification pathway; provide guidance for EPP name changes after a change in ownership; and require educators seeking certification in two areas to have clinical teaching experience in both. Lastly, the board adopted revisions to certification and testing requirements including the incorporation of the new intensive pre-service option; including the portfolio assessment EdTPA as a testing option; and updating the fees to include EdTPA and the subject-matter-only assessments used for the Pre-Admission Content Test (PACT) route (discussed below). Interestingly, the board adopted an amendment proposed by board member Tommy Coleman to clarify in the rule language that the EdTPA assessment option is strictly a pilot.

Board members next took up agenda items for proposal of new rules and the authorization of a public comment period on those. One set of proposed rules includes changes to the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP), which will provide for new commendations for high-performing EPPs; adopt the EPP accountability manual into rule; clarify how EPPs are accredited; allow SBEC to require an EPP to complete an action plan as a sanction for low performance; and make additional technical changes. Additionally, the Board proposed revisions to EPP admission requirements to implement Senate Bill (SB) 1839, HB 2039, HB 3349 that were passed by the 85th Legislature in 2017. The rule changes would add admission requirements for the Early Childhood through Grade 3 (EC-3) and Grades 6-12 Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificates created by those bills. The revisions would also allow candidates to take subject-matter-only assessments for their PACT if they don’t have the commensurate coursework and minimum 2.5 GPA that is required to enter an EPP. Currently, candidates can gain admission through a content pedagogy test, which tests for teaching strategies that the candidate hasn’t been exposed to yet. These items will be eligible for public comment from August 23 to September 23, 2019, and published in the Texas Register.

Since the 86th Legislature just ended its session in May, SBEC must act quickly to approve changes in order to meet the implementation date of several bills that were passed this year. Therefore, a couple items on the board’s agenda went straight to the proposal stage, skipping the initial discussion phase in order to save time. These include rule changes to implement the following bills:

  • SB 1200 by Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels), which allows for military spouses licensed in other states to teach in Texas.
  • HB 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), which repeals the master teacher certificates as of September 1, 2019. Any candidate wishing to gain or renew a master teacher certificate must do so by August 30, 2019. Any current certificates will remain valid up until their expiration date. Please see the Texas Education Agency’s information on master teacher certificates here for more detail.

The Board also took action on two non-rule “board items,” which were discussed at the previous meeting and are effective immediately upon approval. One of these was to approve the ability of the Region 13 Education Service Center (ESC) to offer a Reading Specialist Certification, which is a different class of certification from the master teacher certification. The other item was to name members who will serve on an advisory committee for the newly proposed special education certifications. These certifications would improve upon the current, broad special education certificate by creating a deaf/blind supplemental certificate and multiple new certificates that are more specialized by grade level and the degree of support needed by students.

The following items had been up for discussion at Friday’s SBEC meeting but were moved instead to the board’s October meeting agenda:

  • Proposed changes to educator disciplinary proceedings, sanctions, and contested cases to implement the provisions of HB 3, SB 1230, SB 1476, and SB 37 as passed by the 86th Legislature. Collectively, these bills will impact reporting requirements for superintendents, principals, and directors of public and private schools regarding educator misconduct; create a do-not-hire registry; and remove student loan default as a ground for discipline by SBEC. The anticipated rule changes would also permit SBEC to deny certificates to educators who have abandoned their contract within the past 12 months. This will cover intern and probationary certificates, which SBEC loses jurisdiction over once these 12-month certificates expire.
  • A board item meant to allow the Board to discuss the EPP continuing approval process, which includes procedures for review and update of EPP standards and requirements.
  • A board item to discuss the upcoming educator certification test development updates to current content pedagogy tests. The Principal as Instructional Leader assessment was one of the updated tests and is set to become operational on July 29, 2019. Other new tests will roll out into 2021 and beyond.

The last agenda item, a legislative update, was skipped at Friday’s meeting because members agreed that it had been adequately covered in a July 25th SBEC work group session. Bills impacting SBEC rulemaking as passed by the 86th Legislature include HB 3, HB 18, HB 403, HB 2424, SB 37, SB 241, SB 1200, SB 1230, and SB 1476. All of these except for HB 3’s Science of Teaching Reading certification requirements are now set to be discussed at the October 4, 2019 SBEC meeting. See a detailed table of SBEC’s proposed timeline for implementing provisions of each of these bills here. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for future updates.

Highlights of Friday’s SBEC meeting

The State Board for Education Certification (SBEC) met yesterday, Feb. 22, in Austin to take up an agenda involving several actions items and discussions.

Action Items

The action items for the February 2019 SBEC meeting included:

  • Updates from TEA’s Divisions of Educator Leadership and Quality, which included current numbers on educator certification; educator standards, testing, and preparation; educator investigations; and legal case dockets.
  • Approval of the proposed new rule specifying the certification standards for the English as a Second Language (ESL) Supplemental Certificate (proposed effective July 21, 2019). One of the changes to the standards is a section on culturally responsive teaching in order to construct mutually adaptive learning environments for English learners.
  • Approval of the review of Chapter 249 of Title 19 of the Texas Administrative Code on educator disciplinary proceedings, sanctions, and contested cases. (SBEC rules are reviewed periodically according to a normal schedule, chapter by chapter.)
  • Approval of the proposal to change the closing deadline for the certification and testing requirements for the current Principal Certificate to August 31, 2019. Additionally, all applications must be completed and received by TEA by October 30, 2019. SBEC also heard an update on the 52 educator preparation programs (EPPs) that will now offer the new Principal as Instructional Leader Certificate. See more about Principal Certification Redesign here.
  • Approval of the 2017-18 Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP) accreditation statuses for all EPPs. This is an annual action item.
  • Approval of a new Superintendent class of certificate to be offered by the Harris County Department of Education.
  • Annual review of the Board Operating Policies and Procedures (no changes).
  • Approval of decisions regarding educator litigation and disciplinary cases.

Discussion Items

The board’s agenda included a lengthy discussion on the upcoming EdTPA pilot, which will examine the validity and feasibility of using a performance-based assessment for teacher certification.

  • On the issue of Teacher Certification Redesign, the board found themselves listening to hours of testimony from representatives of university EPPs and alternative certification providers, TeachPlus, and TeachPlus fellows. The majority of board members expressed concern with EdTPA following the testimony, but were at an impasse as no action could be taken since the item was posted on the agenda as discussion-only. Among the discussed alternatives to EdTPA were residency programs (suggested by SBEC member Art Cavazos) and using the T-TESS plus a revised EC-12 Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) exam that includes constructed response questions (suggested by multiple EPPs). The board also very briefly discussed:
    • The shift to subject-matter-only assessments for EPPs that require pre-admission content tests (PACT), which would increase the cost of the test by $106 (proposed effective January 1, 2020).
    • The option of a four-week, intensive pre-service pathway towards an intern certificate, which is meant to incentivize alternative certification and post-baccalaureate programs to have pre-service teaching.
    • Updates to current content exams to support a focus on content pedagogy. Public comment is currently being taken to help develop two of these: the science of teaching reading exam and the EC-3 content exam.
  • Proposed revisions to EPP admissions, specifically to implement the subject-matter-only assessments to be used for the PACT, in lieu of the current exam that tests an applicant’s content and pedagogy knowledge. Currently, only alternative certification programs are able to require PACT for admission purposes. Additionally, the revisions include new rules for the Trade and Industrial Workforce Training (6-12) certification to fulfill the requirements of HB 3349 (passed in the 85th legislative session in 2017).
  • Proposed revisions to requirements for EPPs, including the definition and programmatic requirements of the intensive pre-service option; a new rule that EPPs can change their name for purposes of accreditation only if they change ownership; a new requirement for candidates seeking certification in two fields to have clinical teaching in both fields; and a revision to align EPP responsibilities to the new subject-matter-only PACT exam.
  • Proposed revisions to the guidelines and procedures related to educator testing and certification to reflect the changes of the Teacher Certification Redesign. The revisions would align with new PACT exam definitions, include a 45-day waiting period between test attempts, update required tests for issuance of the standard certificate, create the new requirements for the intensive pre-service option, and update testing fees for edTPA and the new subject-matter-only PACT exams.
  • A discussion of how districts are required to make personnel decisions. For instance, if you have a certificate in Ethnic Studies: Mexican American Studies 9-12, you are allowed to teach a variety of social studies and history courses. Additionally, those with Art certifications will be able to teach Floral Design, grades 9-12.

The next SBEC board meeting will be on April 26, 2017. After approval, items from the agenda will be posted on the Texas Register for public comment. Search the agency “State Board for Educator Certification” to find the items once they are published.

SBEC meets to discuss trade and industrial certification, superintendent certificate

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is meeting in Austin today. ATPE is here to testify and cover the meeting, with a particular focus on two agenda items.

The first item is one that we have reported on thoroughly. The 85th Texas Legislature passed HB 3349 in 2017, which created an abbreviated educator preparation program (EPP) pathway for certain candidates interested in obtaining a new certificate titled the Trade and Industrial Workforce Training Certificate. As SBEC worked to implement the bill via rule, ATPE expressed significant concerns with pieces of the rule that failed to maintain high standards for EPPs in Texas. SBEC ultimately adopted the language without the changes we and other teacher organizations requested. However, as the State Board of Education (SBOE) reviewed the rule, members of the board shared ATPE’s concerns and unanimously rejected the proposal, sending it back to SBEC for further review.

SBEC adopted a new proposal today, and ATPE appreciates that the changes address many of our concerns. Specifically, the proposal addresses three key concerns:

  1. It now maintains a focus on critical pre-service hours by honoring the same 180-hour structure that is required of all other candidates entering the classroom.
  2. It no longer expands the abbreviated program path to the Marketing and Health Science certificates.
  3. It now ensures only EPPs are able to provide training.

The fourth issue we raised, regarding the fact that the proposal fails to prevent these new certificate holders from becoming certified in any other field simply by taking a certification exam without the additional training required of all other candidates, will be addressed at a future SBEC meeting.

ATPE also closely watched an agenda item today regarding a review of the rules pertaining to the Superintendent Certificate. This rule has seen a lot of action in recent years with some seeking to create a non-traditional pathway that fails to require prior experience in public education (including teaching experience) and advanced education. ATPE has consistently opposed such a pathway for Superintendents and recently submitted comments to the board encouraging them to reject any efforts to create the pathway. The Texas Association of School Administrators also attended the meeting today and shared ATPE’s position to maintain the current rule without changes. The board had a positive conversation regarding the importance of administrators as instructional leaders. We will continue to monitor this issue to ensure teaching experience, along with strong managerial experience and educational background, is stressed as key to the success of superintendents.

SBEC meets again in December.

Preview: SBEC to meet Friday and vote on abbreviated educator preparation program

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) meets this Friday to make final decisions about rules implementing H.B. 3349, a bill passed last legislative session that created an abbreviated pathway to obtaining a new certificate to teach trade and industrial workforce classes.

The board gave initial approval to the rule proposal in May, which represents an expansion of both the underlying bill and the original proposal SBEC discussed for several meetings. ATPE opposed the changes at that time and submitted formal comments last month that covered our concerns with the proposal as it currently stands.

“Research shows that access to an effective educator is the most important school-based factor affecting a student’s academic success, and ATPE believes all students deserve access to a well-trained educator.” Our comments stated this because, if adopted on Friday and ultimately approved by the State Board of Education, this will be the only abbreviated certification program adopted by the board.

ATPE’s comments go on to explain that the training an educator candidate gets from one’s educator preparation program (EPP) involves critical time spent learning how to teach, but the proposal devalues the importance of that training by reducing the number of hours these educator candidates are trained prior to entering the classroom as the teacher-or-record.

“ATPE sees no reason why candidates seeking the Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificate should receive less training in this critical area than what is expected of every other candidate. Likewise, students of these educators deserve well-trained educators as much as their peers learning in different classrooms,” we stressed in our comments.

Further, ATPE argues that the proposal (1) unnecessarily reduces the number of pre-service hours and inappropriately adds marketing and health sciences certificates to the abbreviated pathway when neither were discussed or vetted by the legislature and the bill always limited the certificate to “a person seeking certification in trade and industrial workforce training;” (2) haphazardly allows entities other than EPPs to provide up to 90 hours of training without accountability or oversight; and (3) fails to prevent educators trained under this expedited route from seeking other certifications by examination only, without the additional training required of that certificate.

ATPE knows that we cannot expect excellence from teachers without a strong foundation of preparation, and we hope the board maintains its mission of “upholding the highest level of educator preparation” by rejecting these watered-down standards for some educators and their students. The board meets Friday morning to discuss this and other issues. Check back on Teach the Vote for developments from Friday’s meeting and follow me on Twitter at @ATPE_KateK for live updates.