Category Archives: 86th Legislature

Major Texas education groups agree on charter school policy agenda

This month, 15 major education groups in Texas agreed on a policy agenda for charter schools.

The groups include the Association of Texas Professional Educators (ATPE), the Texas State Teachers Association, the Texas Association of School Administrators, the Texas Classroom Teachers Association, the Texas American Federation of Teachers, the Texas Association of School Boards, the Texas Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association, the Coalition for Education Funding, Pastors for Texas Children, Raise Your Hand Texas, the Fast Growth School Coalition, the Texas Association of Community Schools, the Texas Association of Midsize Schools, the Texas School Alliance, and the Intercultural Development and Research Association.

In Texas, 5.5% of students attend charter schools yet they receive 10% of state funding for education. Because charters cannot levy taxes, charter schools are 100% funded by the state. Each charter school student generates the sum of the statewide average adjusted allotment (basic allotment adjusted using various weights for special populations and circumstances) and the statewide average property tax revenue across school districts. Last session, charters gained access for the first time to $60 million in facilities funding, or about $200 per student.

While charters are subject to the same accountability as traditional school districts, there are many differences in how charters operate. Texas law allows charters to accept and expel students based on academics and discipline, to employ non-certified teachers, and to choose whether or not to employ any counselors or school nurses. Additionally, the majority of charter expansion is under the charter amendment process, which allows for uninhibited growth of charter schools.

The joint policy agenda of the groups listed above focuses on increasing the transparency and efficiency of charter schools through seven recommendations for lawmakers:

  1. Allow for public transparency and input before any new charter amendments are approved in a certain community.
  2. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) should consider creating a standard charter application process and maintain an accurate charter school wait list to correctly document the number of unique students desiring charter admission.
  3. Charters should not be able to admit and expel students based on academics and discipline, as this creates inequality between charters and traditional school districts despite the fact that both receive public funds and are expected to educate all students.
  4. The Commissioner of Education should adopt procedures to analyze and report on the expected fiscal, academic, and program impact of each new charter school in order to maintain efficiency of the entire public school system.
  5. Since charters receive nearly $3 billion in public funds each year, they should publicly disclose their financial dealings, including leases, mortgages, contracts, and bond debt.
  6. Parents need to make informed decisions about where to enroll their children and should therefore have access to information on each charter school’s website such as student rates of expulsion, teacher certification and attrition rates, and the percentage of special education students.
  7. Charters received an estimated $882 million more than the school districts in which they reside during the last biennium. It is important to equalize this funding and require charters to pay into the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) just as districts do in order to create parity.

State of the State and Union: Where does education fit in 2019 priorities?

On Feb. 5, 2019, both the Texas Governor and President of the United States delivered high-profile speeches in front of a large audience of lawmakers and the public. In his 2019 State of the State address Wednesday, Governor Greg Abbott began by touting the “economic prowess” of Texas.

The U.S. Capitol, where Pres. Trump delivered his State of the Union address, Feb. 5, 2019

Later that same day, in his 2019 State of the Union address, President Donald Trump similarly expressed sweeping admiration for the successes of our American economy. Despite the idea that the foundation of a great economy is a stellar education, our governor and president differed greatly in the amount of attention they focused on educating our children.

Pres. Trump mentioned education twice during his address. In one instance, the president expressed that our schools were overburdened due to immigration. In another, he said, “To help support working parents, the time has come to pass school choice for America’s children.” Other than these two remarks, the president gave no other details regarding education.

Standing ovation for teacher pay during Gov. Abbott’s 2019 State of the State address

Gov. Abbott spent a large portion of his address speaking on the importance of improving student outcomes. He said that, in order to address low rates of third-grade reading readiness and similarly low rates of college and career readiness, we must target education funding to the people who matter most (other than parents). These are our educators.

According to the governor, nobody plays a more vital role in our children’s education than teachers. He noted in his address that he wants Texas to recruit and retain the best teachers, pay teachers more, provide incentives to put teachers in the classrooms that need them the most, and create pathways to earn a six-figure salary. Gov. Abbott even declared teacher pay an emergency item, along with school finance reform and school safety.

Perhaps we can consider ourselves lucky that education is mostly left up to the states and that – at least for the early weeks of this legislative session – our governor is talking about making teachers and students a priority and not prioritizing harmful distractions such as private school vouchers. As we move forward with the legislative session, it is important to continue making the voice of the teacher heard on topics such as pay, incentives, and recruitment and retention. ATPE members can help by using our tools at Advocacy Central to send messages to lawmakers about these issues and our legislative priorities.

Governor Abbott declares emergency items, includes teacher pay

Texas Governor Greg Abbott announced a total of six emergency items in Tuesday’s State of the State address to a joint session of the 86th Texas Legislature. The State of the State is traditionally delivered by the governor at the beginning of each legislative session, and is the state equivalent to the national State of the Union address delivered by the president.

The governor often uses the State of the State as an opportunity to announce emergency items for the current legislature. The first 60 days of the legislative session are meant for organization and bill filing, and legislators cannot vote on bills until after 60 days have passed. Emergency items declared by the governor are the only exception.

Standing ovation for teacher pay announcement during State of the State address, Feb. 5, 2019.

Governor Abbott listed six emergency items on Tuesday: School finance reform, teacher pay, school safety, mental health, property tax relief, and disaster response.

What does this mean functionally? The legislature may vote on bills under these emergency headings immediately instead of waiting for the March 8 deadline, theoretically granting them a one-month head start ahead of other bills. Yet few of these bills have been filed, and none have begun the committee process that marks the first major step in a bill’s journey to becoming a law. For this reason, the practical impact of designation as emergency items has more to do with sending a signal to legislators and the public that these are the governor’s top priorities.

In addition, each of these items is expected to require a significant amount of state funding. The budget offered by the Texas House would provide $7.1 billion in new revenue for public education, contingent upon spending a significant portion of that money on providing property tax relief, ostensibly by rebalancing the state and local share of education funding. Increasing the state’s share will ease the burden on local property taxpayers, but will not increase overall public school funding. To increase overall school funding will require spending additional money on top of what is required to ease local tax pressure.

Increasing teacher pay will require another tranche of state funds. The Texas Senate has proposed Senate Bill (SB) 3, which would grant teachers a $5,000 annual raise. The bill’s cost is tagged at $3.7 billion for the first biennium. Gov. Abbott’s comments today on teacher pay implied that he prefers a plan under development by House leaders to provide a differentiated pay program that could create a path for select teachers to earn as much as $100,000. This would apply to far fewer teachers than the Senate’s plan and consequently carry a much smaller price tag.

School safety, mental health, and disaster response will each require further funding. Fortunately, the biennial revenue estimate delivered by Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar in January projects legislators will have roughly $12 billion more than they budgeted the previous two years. It’s important to note that some of that money will be taken up by inflation and population growth. Some of the emergency items, such as disaster response, are prime targets for one-time spending from the Economic Stabilization Fund. The state’s “rainy day fund,” as it is often called, is projected to total $15.4 billion by the end of 2021.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Feb. 1, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


Legislators and SBOE members gathered for the board’s swearing-in ceremony, Jan. 28, 2019.

The State Board of Education (SBOE) held its first meetings of the new year this week in Austin. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins attended the meetings and provided updates for our blog.

Things kicked off on Monday when all members of the board, both newly elected and re-elected, were sworn in by Senate Education Committee Chair Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood). Members of the board adopted operating rules for the body, discussed the board’s authority in relation to charter schools, and also approved committee assignments and officer elections,  including naming Marty Rowley (R) of Amarillo as Vice Chair and Georgina Perez (D) of El Paso as Secretary of the board. Additional committee assignments and chair appointments can be viewed in this blog post from Wiggins.

On Tuesday, the board was briefed by Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath on the “State of the State of Public Education” annual report. Morath also discussed the creation of curriculum guides by the Texas Education Agency (TEA), educator compensation, and other topics as noted in this blog post. Wednesday, the board participated in a learning roundtable at the Austin Convention Center where it discussed its Long-Range Plan for Public Education, a list of goals and recommendations to improve public schools by 2030.

Lastly, the SBOE ended its meetings by unveiling today the new logo for the Permanent School Fund, which was designed by Melissa Richardson of Dripping Springs High School as part of a contest. The board will meet again on April 2-5, 2019.

 


SPECIAL ELECTION UPDATE: El Paso residents turned out on Tuesday to elect a new state representative for Texas House District 79. El Paso Community College Chairman, Art Fierro, won the House seat with 53% of the votes in the special election. Fierro will be completing the term of former Rep. Joe Pickett who resigned recently due to health complications. Fierro’s term will expire in 2021. ATPE congratulates Representative-Elect Fierro and looks forward to working with him.

Meanwhile, some Houstonians will still have to wait in order to find out who will be replacing former Rep. Carol Alvarado, who vacated her House seat in District 145 order to run successfully for the Texas State Senate in another special election for Senate District 6. As for the new representative for House District 145, the race has been narrowed down to two Democratic candidates, Christina Morales and Melissa Noriega. The date of the runoff election for HD 145 has not yet been announced.

Lastly, one more seat in the Texas House remains vacant, that of San Antonio Democrat Justin Rodriguez who vacated his seat to run for (and get elected) Bexar County commissioner. Early voting for the House District 125 special election begins Monday with the election being held on Feb. 12. View profiles of the special election candidates on Teach the Vote, and read more about each race in this article by The Texas Tribune.

 


Earlier today, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) released its accreditation statuses for Texas public schools for the 2018-19 school year. The statuses based on academic accountability ratings and the Financial Integrity Rating System of Texas (also known as School FIRST) recognize schools and districts that meet certain academic and financial benchmarks. According to TEA, 99% of Texas schools were designated as accredited for the 2018-19 year. More information can be found in this press release from the agency.

 


House Committee on Public Education

The House Public Education Committee convened its first meeting of the regular session this week. Led by Chairman Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) who is serving his third term as chair, the committee heard from Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff about issues such as STAAR testing, educator certification, and TEA’s Special Education Strategic Plan. The committee will reconvene several times over the next two weeks to hear invited testimony from members of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance and other stakeholders regarding the commission’s recommendations for school finance reform. Learn more in this blog post from ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, who attended this week’s first hearing.

 


The House Appropriations Committee also began meeting this week. ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter attended the first few meetings and provided this update. After opening remarks from Chairman John Zerwas (R-Fulshear), including some gentle ribbing about punctuality that will likely turn into a session long running joke, the committee heard from what is likely the last stop on the Comptroller’s biennial revenue estimate tour. The committee also received from the Legislative Budget Board (LBB) some high-level budget numbers, including  on public education and the Teacher Retirement System (TRS). The committee is scheduled to hear more in-depth testimony on TRS, school safety, and school finance on Monday, Feb. 4. Most of the truly in-depth work on the initial House budget bill is done by subcommittees, including an Article III subcommittee that reviews the education portion of the budget. The members of those subcommittees are determined by the chairman of the Appropriations Committee and will likely be named next week.

The Senate Finance Committee also continued to meet this week but on areas other than public education. The Senate committee will turn its attention to education funding later this month, and ATPE’s lobby team will provide updates here on our Teach the Vote blog.

 


 

SBOE hosts learning roundtable at TASA conference

The State Board of Education (SBOE) took the show on the road Wednesday, moving down the street to the Austin Convention Center to host a learning roundtable at the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) Midwinter Conference.

The Learning Roundtable: Building a Stronger Texas program began with opening remarks by SBOE Chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) laying out the board’s Long-Range Plan for Public Education, which provided the foundation for the day’s discussions. Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence) led off with a panel on family engagement.

Education Commissioner Mike Morath addressing TASA Midwinter Conference.

Texas Education Agency (TEA) Commissioner Mike Morath addressed the conference as the day’s keynote speaker, and noted that the state’s public schools are doing outstanding work. The commissioner pointed to the state’s 90 percent graduation rate, and credited teachers as the single most important factor impacting student achievement.

Morath hosted a panel of standout instructional leaders discussing the craft of growing rockstar teachers. Panels emphasized the importance of training, classroom supports, planning sessions, and educators in leadership roles guiding new teachers.

Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) led a lunchtime discussion of equity and access, featuring Austin ISD Chief of Business Operations Nicole Conley Johnson, who was a member of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance.

Conley Johnson noted that in order to better serve special populations such as students with disabilities, schools need better and more flexible funding. Conley Johnson also cautioned that school safety should focus on the costs of dealing with mental health and trauma, not just hard costs such as metal detectors and infrastructure hardening.

SBOE Member Georgina Perez hosting a panel on Equity & Access.

Perez encouraged TEA staff to travel to border communities to deliver updates on agency initiatives in Spanish. Perez said Texas is the only state to approve a Mexican-American Studies course for all schools across the state, and asked members for thoughts on developing culturally responsive learning environments. Perez also suggested that for each dollar invested in health care, the state sees a $7 return on its investment. Panelists discussed ideas such as building classroom libraries to encourage reading, and recounted moving stories of their reasons for falling in love with education.

Member Lawrence Allen, Jr. (D-Houston) closed out the roundtable discussion with a panel on student empowerment. The board’s Long-Range Plan for Public Education was adopted at the end of 2018 after more than a year of development and stakeholder engagement. The full report can be found here.

The board will return to its usual setting on Thursday, when members will meet in committees and elect chairs. The full board will conclude its week-long meeting Friday.

 

 

Commissioner briefs SBOE on teacher pay issues

Texas Education Agency (TEA) Commissioner Mike Morath addressed the State Board of Education (SBOE) Tuesday morning, kicking off the second day of the board’s week-long January meeting.

Commissioner Mike Morath addressing SBOE, January 29, 2019.

Morath began with a high-level review of the 2018 State of the State of Public Education annual report. Members asked the agency to produce a report detailing state scores on the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) test.

The commissioner walked members through efforts by the agency to create Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) guides to help educators and parents better understand the standards and alignment, as well as resources to help understand assessments and student expectations.

Commissioner Morath briefed members on efforts to review the assessment process, including organizational restructuring to embed the STARR team within the agency’s curriculum department, which ensures that staff who participate in the TEKS review process are the same staff developing questions for the assessment.

Morath also responded to a question about the state of teacher pay legislation in the 86th Texas Legislature. The commissioner noted that a bill has already been filed to give teachers a $5,000 across-the-board raise. There is also legislation in the works to create a differentiated pay program. Morath discussed the impact of higher compensation on teacher quality, and explained that this is primarily aimed at increasing retention and attracting higher quality candidates who may otherwise be turned off by the limited salary potential of teaching.

Tuesday’s meeting included an update from Member Keven Ellis (R-Lufkin) on the Texas Commission on Public School Finance, on which Ellis sat as the board’s sole representative. The final report can be found here.

Ellis said the commission’s goals included balancing the state and local share of funding for public education, restructuring the system by reallocating outdated or otherwise inefficient weights and programs, and substantially increasing the level of equity with significantly greater investment in low-income, underperforming student groups. Goals also included reducing the growth rate of property taxes and reliance on recapture, as well as infusing significant state funds into public education.

The commission contemplated proposals to slow recapture and property tax growth, including the governor’s plan, a plan by the Texas Taxpayers and Research Association (TTARA), and a share recapture plan. Ellis noted that the commission decided to allow the current legislative session to take up the discussion of revenues.

Responding to questions from other board members, Ellis suggested that the commission’s findings will likely involve at least one large package, with additional pieces filed individually. New board Member Aicha Davis (D-Dallas) asked about the sustainability of Dallas ISD’s “ACE” differentiated pay program. Ellis pointed out that the district’s superintendent testified to the program’s enormous cost.

The board will spend Wednesday hosting a learning roundtable at the Austin Convention Center, and will return to the TEA building on Thursday to break up into committees and elect committee chairs.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Jan. 25, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


On Wednesday, Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen released his chamber’s committee assignments for the 86th legislature. Speaker Bonnen assigned chairmanships to Republicans and Democrats alike with each party having a number of chairmanships roughly proportionate to its representation in the House, which is contrast to the Senate where Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick appointed only a single Democrat to chair a committee. Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) will continue to chair the House Committee on Public Education with Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) again serving as Vice-Chair. A full list of House committee assignments can be found here. View Senate committee assignments as previously reported on Teach the Vote here.

Meanwhile, there remain three vacancies in the House pending upcoming special elections. Voters in House Districts 79 and 145 will elect a new state representative (unless there is a need for a runoff) during a special election on Tuesday, Jan. 29. ATPE encourages educators in El Paso and Houston to visit the Candidates page on Teach the Vote to view the candidates who are vying for election in those two districts. A special election will take place to fill the third vacancy in San Antonio’s House District 125 on Feb. 12, 2019.

 


Earlier this week the Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced the recipients of Cycle 2 of the agency’s Grow Your Own grant period. An initiative created as a result of Commissioner of Education Mike Morath’s 2016 Texas Rural Schools Task Force, the Grow Your Own grant program was designed to help school districts inspire high school students to pursue careers as classroom teachers, certified paraprofessionals, or teacher aides.

Research shows that 60 percent of educators in the United States teach within 20 miles of where they went to high school,” said Commissioner Morath. “Because we know our future teachers are currently in our high schools, the goal of Grow Your Own is to help increase the quality and diversity of our teaching force and to better support our paraprofessionals, teacher’s aides and educators, especially in small and rural districts.”

Thirty-six school districts and educator preparation programs were selected for Cycle 2 of the program: Bob Hope School (Port Arthur), Bridge City ISD, Brooks County ISD, Castleberry ISD, Del Valle ISD, Elgin ISD, Fort Bend ISD, Fort Hancock ISD, Grand Prairie ISD, Hillsboro ISD, La Vega ISD, Lancaster ISD, Laredo ISD, Longview ISD, Marble Falls ISD, Mineola ISD, Muleshoe ISD, New Caney ISD, Palestine ISD, Presidio ISD, Region 20 Education Service Center, Relay Graduate School of Education, Rosebud-Lott ISD, Sabinal ISD, Somerset ISD, Stephen F. Austin State University, Texas A&M University, Texas A&M University- Commerce, Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi, Texas Tech University, Texas Woman’s University, Vidor ISD, Waxahachie Faith Family Academy, West Texas A&M University, Westwood ISD, and Woodville ISD.

The full press release from TEA can be found here.


Two congressmen from Texas will be serving on the U.S. House Education and Labor Committee for the 116th Congress.

Both Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-TX 20) and Rep. Van Taylor (R-TX 03) will be serving on the committee, which has gone several years without a Texas member among its ranks. In press releases published earlier this week, both Castro and Taylor spoke of their commitment to finding bipartisan solutions to challenges faced by America’s education system and workforce. ATPE congratulates Congressmen Castro and Taylor on their appointments and looks forward to working with them in Washington on federal education issues.

 


With the legislative session underway and committees in place, we’re beginning to see a busy calendar of upcoming hearings, which ATPE’s lobby team will be participating in and reporting on throughout the session for Teach the Vote. State agencies and boards also have upcoming meetings of interest to education stakeholders, and we’re your go-to source for updates on any developments.

Next week, the State Board of Education (SBOE) will hold its first meeting of the new year starting Monday in Austin, where new members will be officially sworn in. Matt Robinson (R-Friendswood), Pam Little (R-Fairview), and Aicha Davis (D-Dallas) are joining the board following the 2018 election cycle. The board will also elect a vice-chair and secretary and announce the chairs of its three standing committees: School Initiatives, Instruction, and School Finance/Permanent School Fund.

SBOE members will host a learning roundtable Wednesday at the Austin Convention Center that will focus on the Long-Range Plan for Public Education, which the board released at the end of 2018.

Rep. Dan Huberty

Also on Wednesday, the House Public Education Committee will hold its first meeting of the 86th legislative session. The committee, under the chairmanship of Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), is expected to consider major bills related to school finance and teacher pay this session. Wednesday’s meeting will feature invited testimony from Texas Education Agency (TEA) Commissioner Mike Morath.

 


The Senate Finance Committee began its work on the state budget this week with its chairwoman Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound) introducing Senate Bill (SB) 1, the Senate’s version of the budget. The budget is broken down into several different articles that represent different policy areas. Article III, which includes TEA, the Foundation School Program, and TRS, as well as higher education funding, is set to be discussed the week of Feb. 11.

In addition to SB 1, the Senate Finance committee also laid out SB 500, the Senate’s supplemental appropriations bill. SB 500 includes approximately $2.5 billion in proposed funding from the Economic Stabilization Fund (ESF), or Rainy Day fund. With about $1 billion of that money going to Hurricane Harvey relief, the bill includes a substantial amount for affected school districts. Another $300 million has been slated toward the TRS pension fund.

The House Committee on Appropriations was also named this week and will begin its work right away, including naming the members of the subcommittee that will oversee the portion of the budget dedicated to education for the House. Initial hearings are slated for next Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates from ATPE’s lobbyists as various budget-related proposals move through the legislative process.

 


House releases committee assignments for the 86th Legislature

Earlier today, the Office of Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen (R-Angleton) released the committee assignments for the 86th session of the Texas House. Of particular interest to the education community during a session that already appears heavily focused on school finance reform, Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) retains his chairmanship of the House Public Education Committee, and Rep. John Zerwas (R-Fulshear) will continue to chair the House Appropriations Committee.

The list below contains the names of the Chair and Vice-Chair of each respective committee, while the full committee lists for the House can be viewed here:

Agriculture & Livestock 

  • Rep. Drew Springer (R-Muenster), Chair
  • Rep. Charles “Doc” Anderson (R-Waco), Vice-Chair

Appropriations

  • Rep. John Zerwas (R-Katy), Chair
  • Rep. Oscar Longoria (D-Mission), Vice-Chair

Business & Industry 

  • Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D-San Antonio), Chair
  • Rep. Drew Darby (R-San Angelo), Vice-Chair

Calendars

  • Rep. Four Price (R-Amarillo), Chair
  • Rep. Joseph Moody (D-El Paso), Vice Chair

Corrections

  • Rep. James White (R-Hillister), Chair
  • Rep. Alma Allen (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

County Affairs 

  • Rep. Garnet Coleman (D-Houston), Chair
  • Rep. Dwayne Bohac (R-Houston), Vice-Chair

Criminal Jurisprudence 

  • Rep. Nicole Collier (D-Fort Worth), Chair
  • Rep. William “Bill” Zedler (R-Arlington), Vice-Chair

Culture, Recreation & Tourism

  • Rep. John Cyrier (R-Lockhart), Chair
  • Rep. Armando Martinez (D-Weslaco), Vice-Chair

Defense & Veterans’ Affairs 

  • Rep. Dan Flynn (R-Canton), Chair
  • Rep. Tony Tinderholt (R-Arlington), Vice-Chair

Elections

  • Rep. Stephanie Klick ( R-Fort Worth), Chair
  • Rep. Philip Cortez (D-San Antonio), Vice-Chair

Energy Resources 

  • Rep. Chris Paddie (R-Marshall), Chair
  • Rep. Abel Herrero (D-Robstown), Vice-Chair

Environmental Regulation 

  • Rep. J.M. Lozano (R-Kingsville), Chair
  • Rep. Ed Thompson (R-Brazoria), Vice-Chair

General Investigating 

  • Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Dallas), Chair
  • Rep. Nicole Collier (D-Fort Worth), Vice-Chair

Higher Education 

  • Rep. Chris Turner (D-Tarrant), Chair
  • Rep. Lynn Stucky (R-Denton), Vice-Chair

Homeland Security & Public Safety 

  • Rep. Poncho Nevarez (D-Eagle Pass), Chair
  • Rep. Paul Dennis (R-Houston), Vice-Chair

House Administration 

  • Rep. Charlie Geren (R-Fort Worth), Chair
  • Rep. Donna Howard (D-Austin), Vice-Chair

Human Services 

  • Rep. James Frank (R-Wichita Falls), Chair
  • Rep. Gina Hinojosa (D-Austin), Vice-Chair

Insurance 

  • Rep. Eddie Lucio III (D-Brownsville), Chair
  • Rep. Tom Oliverson (R-Cypress), Vice-Chair

International Relations & Economic Development 

  • Rep. Rafael Anchia (D-Dallas), Chair
  • Rep. John Frullo (R-Lubbock), Vice-Chair

Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence 

  • Rep. Jeff Leach (R-Plano), Chair
  • Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

Juvenile Justice & Family Issues 

  • Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston), Chair
  • Rep. Andrew Murr (R-Junction), Vice-Chair

Land & Resource Management 

  • Rep. Tom Craddick (R-Midland), Chair
  • Rep. Sergio Munoz Jr. (D-Palmview), Vice-Chair

Licensing & Administrative Records

  • Rep. Tracy King (D-Uvalde), Chair
  • Rep. Craig Goldman (R-Fort Worth), Vice-Chair

Local & Consent Calendars

  • Rep. Geanie W. Morrison (R-Victoria) Chair
  • Rep. Mary Gonzalez (D-El Paso), Vice-Chair

Natural Resources 

  • Rep. Lyle Larson (R-San Antonio), Chair
  • Rep. Will Metcalf (R-Conroe), Vice-Chair

Pensions, Investments, & Financial Services 

  • Rep. Jim Murphy (R-Houston), Chair
  • Rep. Hubert Vo (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

Public Education

  • Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), Chair
  • Rep. Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio), Vice-Chair

Public Health

  • Rep. Senfronia Thompson (D-Harris), Chair
  • Rep. John Wray (R-Waxahachie), Vice-Chair

Redistricting 

  • Rep. Phil King (R-Parker), Chair
  • Rep. Chris Turner (D-Tarrant), Vice-Chair

Resolutions Calendars 

  • Rep. Ryan Guillen (D-Rio Grande City), Chair
  • Rep. Rick Miller (R-Sugar Land), Vice-Chair

State Affairs 

  • Rep. Dade Phelan (R-Beaumont), Chair
  • Rep. Ana Hernandez (D-Houston), Vice-Chair

Transportation 

  • Rep. Terry Canales (D-Edinburg), Chair
  • Rep. Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa), Vice-Chair

Urban Affairs 

  • Rep. Angie Chen Button (R-Richardson), Chair
  • Rep. Matt Shaheen (R-Plano), Vice Chair

Ways & Means

  • Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock), Chair
  • Rep. Ryan Guillen (D-Rio Grande City), Vice Chair

Again, a full list of the complete House committee assignments for 2019 can be found here. Also, view the Senate committee assignments for this session here.

 

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Jan. 18, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Both the Texas House and Senate released their preliminary budget proposals for the 2020-21 biennium this week. A key feature of each chamber’s plan was how much more funding had been proposed for public education, likely resulting from the uptick in educator engagement at the polls last year and in policy discussions over the interim.

The House proposal for public education funding includes a 17.2 percent increase from general revenue, while the Senate’s proposal would increase funding from general revenue by 10.3 percent. The Senate Finance Committee has already released a full schedule of upcoming budget hearings, including one on Feb. 11 to discuss the public education portion of the budget. Expect similar hearings to be scheduled in the House once Speaker Dennis Bonnen releases a list of House committee assignments, likely later this month.

On Tuesday, Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound) filed Senate Bill 3 (SB 3) relating to additional funding to school districts for classroom teacher salaries. The low bill number indicates that this is a high priority bill in the upper chamber. In short, both the House and Senate are trying to signal to the public that they’ve received the message loud and clear from voters: it’s time to properly fund public education. But don’t count your chickens before they hatch, as it’s important to remember that a filed bill does not a law make.

Now is the time for educators and community members to continue to press their point so that House and Senate budget negotiations will proceed with a sharp focus on the needs of Texas public schools. To keep abreast of what’s happening at the legislature on the budget, teacher pay bills, and other pieces of legislation, and to contact your legislators directly, visit our Advocacy Central page for ATPE members only.

For more on the House and Senate budget proposals that have been filed, read this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. Also, check out last night’s episode of the Spectrum News program Capital Tonight featuring an interview with ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter discussing the proposals to increase public education funding this session.


The League of Women Voters (LWV) has created a survey designed to capture information about how Texas voters find information on voting and elections. LWV encourages users who take the 10-20 minute survey to think of it as a “scavenger hunt” where after being asked a few questions users will set out to hunt down information on the Texas Secretary of State’s website. More information about the scavenger hunt can be found here.


 Earlier today, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick announced who would be chairing each of 16 Senate committees this session. Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendship) will remain the chair of the Senate Education committee. Meanwhile, Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston) will be chair of the Senate State Affairs committee while Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Harris County) will chair the new Senate Property Tax Committee.

For a full list of all Senate committee members and chairs, read this blog post from earlier today.


Online registration for ATPE at the Capitol will close Thursday, Jan. 24, and ATPE members won’t want to miss this opportunity to get up close and personal to the action at this year’s legislative session. Funding for public education along with calls for increased educator compensation have emerged as issues at the forefront of this session. Now more than ever we need educators to visit the legislature and advocate for their profession. ATPE at the Capitol will be held on Feb. 24-25, with political involvement training taking place on Sunday, Feb. 24, and visits with House and Senate members happening on Feb. 25.

There is no registration fee for ATPE members to attend ATPE at the Capitol, and ATPE also has funds available to assist some local units and individual members defray their travel costs for attending the event. Incentive funds will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis upon a showing of demonstrated need and subject to certain eligibility criteria. The deadline to apply for travel incentives is also Jan. 24, 2019. Hotel rooms at the J.W. Marriott hotel, where the event will be held, are available for booking using the special link found on the event’s registration page. Hotel reservations must also be booked by Thursday’s deadline in order to take advantage of special discounted room rates.

We hope to see many ATPE members alongside our professional lobby team next month during ATPE at the Capitol!

 


 

Senate announces committee assignments for the 86th legislative session

 Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick announced Senate committee assignments for the 86th legislative session earlier today. The leaders of the committees are as follows:

Administration

  • Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola), Chair
  • Sen. Pat Fallon (R-Denton County), Vice-Chair

Agriculture 

  • Sen. Kel Seliger (R-Amarillo), Chair
  • Sen. Jose Rodriguez (D-Alice), Vice-Chair

Business & Commerce 

  • Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-Fort Worth), Chair
  • Sen. Robert Nichols (R-Jacksonville), Vice-Chair

Criminal Justice

  • Sen. John Whitmire (R-Hillsboro), Chair
  • Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston), Vice-Chair

Education 

  • Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Houston), Chair
  • Sen. Eddie Lucio II (D-Brownsville), Vice-Chair

Finance 

  • Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), Chair
  • Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Harris County), Vice-Chair

Health & Human Services

  • Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, (R-Brenham), Chair
  • Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock), Vice-Chair

Higher Education 

  • Sen. Brandon Creighton (R-Conroe), Chair
  • Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas), Vice-Chair

Intergovernmental Relations

  • Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr. (D-Brownsville), Chair
  • Sen. Charles Schwertner (R-Georgetown), Vice-Chair

Natural Resources & Economic Development

  • Sen. Brian Birdwell (R-Granbury), Chair
  • Sen. Judith Zaffirini (D-Laredo), Vice-Chair

Nominations 

  • Sen. Dawn Buckingham (R-Lakeway), Chair
  • Sen. Kirk Watson (D-Austin), Vice-Chair

Property Tax

  • Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Harris County), Chair
  • Sen. Angela Paxton (R-McKinney), Vice-Chair

State Affairs 

  • Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston), Chair
  • Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola), Vice-Chair

Transportation 

  • Sen. Robert Nichols (R-Jacksonville), Chair
  • Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-North Richland Hills), Vice-Chair

Veteran Affairs & Border Security 

  • Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels), Chair
  • Sen. Bob Hall (R-Edgewood), Vice-Chair

Water & Rural Affairs 

  • Sen. Charles Perry (R-Lubbock), Chair
  • Sen. Brandon Creighton (R-Conroe), Vice Chair

Committees in both the House and the Senate are an integral part of the legislative process. Once a bill has been introduced on the floor it is referred to a committee where committee chairs have the power to hold hearings on the bill in order to get testimony and make amendments or to hold the bill hostage and not have it move forward in the legislative process at all.

The above is only a list of committee chair and vice-chair assignments a full list of assignments can be found here.