Author Archives: Mark Wiggins

Texas election roundup: Last chance to vote in the runoffs!

Friday, July 10, is the last day to early vote before the July 14 runoff elections across Texas, and campaigns are in the final sprint to the finish line.

With the pandemic ramping up across much of the state, heading to a polling location can seem like a frightening prospect at the moment. Check out a few ways to reduce your risk while voting in a pandemic, as well as this post on ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier’s experience voting.

Through Wednesday, 316,664 people cast votes in the Republican runoffs, 30% of whom voted by mail. Another 482,020 voted in the Democratic runoffs, 38% of whom voted by mail. Turnout was 1.94% for Republicans and 2.95% for Democrats, for a combined turnout of 4.89%.

Even though the turnout number is still extremely low, it marks a substantial increase from the 2.13% combined turnout by mid-week of early voting in the 2018 runoffs and 1.45% in the 2016 runoffs. Unlike previous runoff elections, Gov. Greg Abbott added an extra week of early voting during this year’s runoffs with the aim of spreading out voters to reduce crowding at polling locations.

The latest campaign finance reports show incumbents with the usual fundraising advantage. However there were some notable findings in the reports. Gov. Greg Abbott’s campaign spent at least $125,000 after jumping into the runoffs to thrash Empower Texans, after the anti-public education organization mocked the governor’s disability. Speaking of which, Empower Texans bankroller Farris Wilks gave $425,000 to son-in-law Jon Francis in House District 60, where he faces Texas Parent PAC endorsed candidate Glenn Rogers in the Republican runoff.

Campaigns have continued to find creative ways to deal with the pandemic even as infection rates soar. Futuro RGV hosted an online debate in Senate District 27, where state Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville) faces challenger Sara Stapleton Barrera. You can watch a video of their debate here.

Raise Your Hand Texas, which is funded by HEB owner Charles Butt to advocate for public education, hosted a pair of virtual panels this week featuring runoff races. Tuesday’s panel included state Rep. Roland Gutierrez (D-San Antonio) and attorney Xochil Pena Rodriguez, both of whom are running for the Democratic nomination to face Republican state Sen. Pete Flores (R-Pleasanton) in Senate District 19. The seat was previously held by state Sen. Carlos Uresti (D-San Antonio), before flipping Republican in a special election in 2018. You can view their discussion here.

Thursday’s panel featured Democrat Dr. Suleman Lalani and Republicans Jacey Jetton and Matt Morgan sparring for an open seat in House District 26. Lalani is in a runoff with Sarah DeMerchant, who did not participate in the panel. During the discussion, both Jetton and Morgan announced support for vouchers. You can view their conversation here.

Our friends at the Texas Educators Vote coalition remind you to vote safely and make your voice heard! This begins with reviewing voting histories and candidate profiles right here at TeachTheVote.org under the candidates tab. Happy voting!

Texas election roundup: Early voting begins Monday, June 29

Early voting begins Monday, June 29, 2020, for the July 14 primary runoff elections across the state of Texas, as well as for a special election to fill an open Texas Senate seat in Central Texas.

Gov. Greg Abbott postponed the runoff elections three months ago from their original May 26 election date over concerns about the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. Infections today are even higher than they were back then, which highlights the importance of making a plan to vote safely.

As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, the Texas Secretary of State last month released a list of “minimum recommended health protocols” for voting, which instructs voters to consider maintaining six feet of separation, self-screen, bring their own stylus or pencil with eraser, bring hand sanitizer, and wear a mask when they head to the polls. For those experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, voters are encouraged to consider utilizing curbside voting if they meet the eligibility requirements. Curbside voting is typically reserved for voters with disabilities who are not physically able to enter polling locations without assistance or who may be likely to injure their health by doing so.

Texas polling places must offer curbside voting for certain individuals who are unable to enter a polling location due to a disability. The Secretary of State’s website explains, “If a voter is physically unable to enter the polling place, he or she may ask that an election officer bring a ballot to the entrance of the polling place or to a car at parked at the curbside. After the voter marks the ballot, they will give it to the election officer, who will put it in the ballot box. Or, at the voter’s request, a companion may hand the voter a ballot and deposit it for him or her.” The Secretary of State’s office suggests checking your county’s voting website and calling ahead to the polling location before voting curbside. You can read more about curbside voting in this post by Disability Rights Texas.

The Secretary of State’s office offered additional info on curbside voting and voting by mail in a webinar hosted earlier this month by the Texas League of Women Voters. State officials emphasized that if a voter has voted by mail in the past and their qualifying circumstances have not changed, they can still vote by mail.

With the possibility of a greater number of voters choosing to vote curbside and fewer election volunteers working at polling places due to the coronavirus pandemic, early voting and allowing ample time to cast your vote is extra important for this runoff. The Texas League of Women Voters recommends voting early during non-peak hours in order to encounter the fewest people possible. The Secretary of State’s office also recently reiterated the importance of voting early and following the health and safety protocols, stating, “It is essential to our democracy that Texans are able to safely and confidently cast their vote.”

Multiple lawsuits have been filed aimed at expanding the ability of Texans to vote by mail, as some voters feel they must make a choice this year between exercising their civic duty by voting and protecting their health and that of their families. The fact remains that voting is the single most powerful way to ensure elected officials prioritize public education, listen to educators, and put children first. The decision of whether to cast your vote is yours alone, and we recognize the courage it takes to participate in democracy at this unprecedented moment in history. We urge you to follow all of the safety precautions to protect yourself while you exercise this most critical constitutional right.

As a reminder, early voting runs June 29 – July 10, 2020. Check out ATPE’s profiles of candidates for the Texas Legislature and State Board of Education here on Teach the Vote.

Governor acknowledges COVID-19 surge, but no new mandates

Gov. Greg Abbott acknowledged that cases of COVID-19 are surging in Texas, but did not issue any new executive orders or require any additional action be taken to decrease the spread. The governor and his top healthcare advisors held an afternoon press conference Monday at the Texas Capitol, all donning masks while not speaking.

The governor repeatedly encouraged Texans to wear masks, which have been proven to slow the spread of the deadly disease. While acknowledging that some people view wearing a mask as infringing on their personal freedom, Abbott at the same time stressed that wearing masks is crucial to fully reopening businesses and to preventing deaths. Yet the governor again stopped short of making masks mandatory, instead suggesting individual communities could determine whether to require masks based on local needs. Gov. Abbott said today that because of the differentiation in the impact of COVID-19 from county to county, there must be “a level of flexibility.” The governor only recently allowed cities and counties to issue their own orders about the requirements for wearing masks in certain public places, marking a reversal from his previous warnings not to restrict individuals’ choices not to wear a mask.

Gov. Abbott did not announce any additional restrictions on businesses or social gatherings Monday, only cautioning that future action may need to be taken if Texans do not behave responsibly by continuing to wear masks, wash their hands, practice social distancing, and stay home if they’re sick. Regarding the upcoming elections, early voting for which starts next week, the governor suggested voters adhere to the same safety guidelines.

During today’s press conference, Gov. Abbott did not address plans to reopen schools in August with in-person instruction, on which the governor spoke and we wrote last week. The Dallas Morning News published an editorial Monday calling on schools to provide personal protective equipment (PPE) and clear safety guidelines to keep students and teachers safe. Both the governor and the commissioner of education have said that the Texas Education Agency (TEA) will provide additional information about the return to school and related guidelines this week, most likely tomorrow. ATPE has been updating our Coronavirus FAQ and Resources page for educators as we receive additional information from state officials, and we’ll continue to post updates here about any new developments.

Educators cite health and safety as their top concern in ATPE survey

Educators say health and safety issues are their biggest concerns heading into the next school year in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to results of a statewide poll of more than 4,200 educators recently conducted by ATPE.

Just over 72% of the respondents identified themselves as current classroom teachers. The rest included administrators, counselors, librarians, diagnosticians, support staff, and other school employees.

More than 63% of those surveyed said they were concerned over the health and safety of students heading into the 2020-21 school year amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Just over 60% said they were concerned about their own health and safety. Roughly 45% voiced concern over student learning gaps and learning loss, and 35% listed increased workloads and demands on their time.

“Ever since campuses closed, Texas educators have expressed to ATPE and each other their concern for students’ welfare, both in terms of their health and safety and educational opportunity,” ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes said in a press release accompanying the poll results. “Public education is headed into uncharted waters as schools deal with the complexities related to student and educator safety as well as the rising challenges that come with educating a diverse student population with varying needs.”

Policymakers are wrestling with how to address the unique challenges placed on the public education system by the deadly coronavirus pandemic at a time when the economic recession has severely curtailed the amount of revenue that will be available to schools. It’s more important than ever for educators’ voices to be a part of that conversation.

As state legislators and the staff at the Texas Education Agency are weighing questions about how to allocate state and federal funding, local school districts are facing tough decisions about how best to deliver education services in the upcoming school year in a way that minimizes the spread of COVID-19. The results of the ATPE poll indicate educators’ top concern by far revolves around an educational environment that protects the health of students, faculty, and staff.

“There are no easy solutions here, but ATPE stands behind our state’s educators as they tackle these challenges head-on,” Holmes said. “It is imperative that we listen closely to their needs, concerns, an experiences as we head into the new school year, however it may look.”

Read more about the poll in this blog post on atpe.org.

Texas election roundup: Registration deadline approaching!

It’s hard to imagine, but we are quickly approaching another important election in Texas! The primary runoff elections that were postponed to July 14 from their original May 26 date are almost upon us. In fact, Monday, June 15, 2020, is the last day to register to vote before this election.

Not sure if you are registered to vote? Check your status online using this handy resource provided by the Texas Secretary of State. It’s a great habit to get into to take two minutes to make sure your voter address and registration status are correct and up-to-date. If you need to register or make corrections to your registration, click here.

While the following saying may or may not be attributable to founding father Thomas Jefferson, it is nonetheless true:

“We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.”

This is why ATPE continues to emphasize the importance of voting, and why your vote in a runoff election may be the most influential vote you cast throughout the entire election cycle. That’s because turnout is typically so low in a runoff election that the outcome of each race may be decided by just a handful of voters.

This is a critical time for our state. The candidates voters choose to represent them will have tremendous influence over school funding, state assessments, teacher pay, school safety, and countless other issues that will be even more important in light of the pandemic and the resulting economic recession. To put an even finer point on the matter, candidates elected this year to the Texas Legislature could make the difference in next year’s state budget decisions that will have a direct impact on school district staffing.

Remember also that in many cases here in Texas, the winners of the July 14 runoffs will become the ultimate winners of the final election in November, since so many races in Texas are decided by the primaries and not the general election. If you are eligible to vote in the upcoming runoff, as many of you are, we encourage you to learn about the candidates ahead of the election, and make sure your family and friends turn out to vote, as well.

Find out who is running in your district by checking out the Candidates section of our Teach the Vote website. Read their responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey, check out the incumbent legislators’ voting records on education issues, and arm yourself with the information necessary to make an informed choice in support of public education.

Make your voice heard. Early voting in the runoff elections begins June 29, 2020.

Texas election roundup: The mail voting seesaw

The back and forth over calls to expand mail-in voting peaked this week with a flurry of court orders, further confusing what has become a dramatic, partisan fight. One side of the debate believes voters should not be forced to risk their health and the health of their families in order to exercise their fundamental right to vote, while the other side argues there is too much risk of voter fraud to allow the expansion of mail-in balloting.

To bring you back up to speed, Texas faces several lawsuits by individual voters and interested organizations seeking to expand voting by mail. Because Texas law restricts mail-in voting to individuals who meet a narrow set of eligibility criteria, one of which is having a disability, many of the plaintiffs’ arguments call for treating voters’ health-related fears of exposure to the coronavirus as a disability. Governor Greg Abbott and Attorney General Ken Paxton are leading the fight against opening up voting by mail to those voters who fear contracting COVID-19 but may not otherwise qualify for a mail-in ballot. Many states, with Republican and Democratic governors alike, have already decided to expand voting by mail in light of the pandemic-related concerns.

The seesaw through the courts began with a state district court ordering, first, that all Texans who are concerned about contracting COVID-19 should be allowed to vote by mail. Last week, a state appellate court upheld that order. Appealing the ruling on behalf of the state, Abbott and Paxton echoed President Donald Trump’s claim that expanding voting by mail would increase voter fraud, which many election experts say is “extremely rare” and preventable. The all-Republican Texas Supreme Court announced Friday the expansion of mail-in voting would be put on hold temporarily while it considers the case.

Health care professionals and institutions from around the state have since filed a brief to the Texas Supreme Court arguing that COVID-19 would almost certainly be spread at polling locations, even with protocols such as sanitizing voting machines and requiring PPE for in-person voting. According to the brief, “When the risk for injury to registered voters is so severe—potentially deadly—there is little to no benefit for in-person voting when a viable mail-in alternative is already available by statute.”

The Texas Supreme Court heard arguments from both sides on Wednesday, May 20, and Paxton has asked the state’s highest court to quickly issue a ruling.

Meanwhile, the dispute over mail-in ballots is simultaneously playing out in the federal courts, too. On Tuesday, May 19, a federal judge ruled on a similar lawsuit filed in U.S. district court, finding that the state’s current restrictions on voting by mail violate the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution and ruling that all registered voters in Texas could apply to vote by mail. Judge Fred Biery wrote in his decision, “The Court finds the Grim Reaper’s scepter of pandemic disease and death is far more serious than an unsupported fear of voter fraud in this sui generis experience.”

Paxton immediately appealed the federal judge’s ruling to the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which upon Paxton’s request agreed on Wednesday, May 20, to temporarily stay Judge Biery’s ruling while it decides whether to permanently overturn the decision.

Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates on the frequently changing status of this debate.

Texas election roundup: Senate special election

Wednesday, May 13, 2020, marked the deadline for candidates to file for the legislative seat recently vacated by former state Sen. Kirk Watson (D-Austin).

The Democrats vying for the reliably blue Senate District (14) seat based in Austin include state Rep. Eddie Rodriguez (D-Austin) and former Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt. The two Republicans who have filed are activist and former Austin city council member Don Zimmerman and attorney Waller Burns II, who does not appear to have a campaign website or social media presence. Libertarian Pat Dixon and physician Jeff Ridgeway, running as an independent candidate, have also filed for the seat.

The special election for the SD 14 seat is scheduled for July 14, which is the same day as the primary runoff elections. Gov. Greg Abbott (R-Texas) announced this week that early voting in these elections will be extended to June 29 from July 6. Voters are normally given only one week to vote early in the runoffs, but Abbott’s order will extend that period to two weeks. The governor’s stated reasoning is to enable greater social distancing for in-person voting.

Whether to vote in person or by mail has become a politicized and polarizing issue, unfortunately, with numerous local and state officials along with President Donald Trump weighing in on different sides of the debate. Voters who go to the polls in person may still be exposed to the risk of communicating the deadly COVID-19 infection, the number of confirmed cases of which have continued to increase in Texas at ever higher rates. While several other states, including states such as Kentucky and Alabama with Republican leadership, have expanded voting by mail options in order to protect their voters’ safety, Gov. Abbott and state Attorney General Ken Paxton continue to resist efforts to expand voting by mail in Texas.

A state appeals court ruled Thursday that the state and counties must follow a district judge’s order allowing all Texas voters to vote by mail if they are concerned about contracting COVID-19. Paxton has fought the order and this week asked the Texas Supreme Court to consider the case. Meanwhile, Paxton faces a new criminal complaint alleging he committed election fraud by sending a letter in which he warned counties to ignore the judge’s order.

A coalition of voters and civil rights organizations filed another lawsuit in federal court this week seeking to loosen the restrictions on voting by mail. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) joined a separate federal lawsuit filed last month to expand voting by mail in Texas, arguing that the current laws discriminate against Hispanic voters.

While the political debate over voting by mail continues, polling suggests the overwhelming majority of citizens support expanding access to voting by mail. A Dallas Morning News/University of Texas poll last month found 58% of Texans support allowing any registered voter to mail in a ballot without need for an excuse, compared to 22% who opposed. A 56% majority support extending this ability to all future elections. According to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, 67% of Americans support mail-in ballots for the November elections.

UPDATE: Texas election roundup: Runoff registration

*This post has been updated to reflect the governor’s decision to extend early voting in the July 14 primary runoffs by one week in an attempt to accommodate greater social distancing. Early voting will begin Monday, June 29, as opposed to July 6.

With the endless daily news updates on the coronavirus, it’s easy to forget that there’s still an election creeping up on us. The primary runoff elections that were originally scheduled to be held this month are now set for July 14, although a fierce battle is being waged over the best way to conduct this election in order to ensure the safety of Texas voters. We’ll provide an update on that important battle in a separate post. Instead, today’s post will brush up on who can vote in the runoffs.

In Texas, you don’t have to declare a political party. The primary elections are open, which means that anyone can vote in any primary they choose — but only one! If a single candidate doesn’t win at least 50% of the vote in a primary election with three or more candidates, the top two finishers head to a primary runoff election.

Anyone can vote in the runoffs — even if they didn’t vote in the the primaries! If you didn’t vote in the primary elections, you can vote in whichever party’s runoff you choose. It’s as simple as that.

Now here’s where the rules for runoffs get slightly more complicated. If you voted in the March 3 primary elections, you can only vote in the same party’s primary runoff election. So for example, if you voted in the Republican primary on March 3, then you can only vote in the Republican party’s runoff on July 14. You can’t switch.

So, how do I know if I’m eligible to vote? You have to be registered to vote in the county in which you live. If you’re not sure whether you’re registered — maybe you recently moved — you can check your registration status by clicking here. If you’re an eligible citizen 18 years or older and are not registered, the deadline to register to vote in the runoff elections is Monday, June 15, 2020. If you need to register, click here.

Here is a list of key dates leading up to the election:

  • Monday, June 15: Last day to register to vote in the July 14 elections.
  • Thursday, July 2: Last day to apply for a mail ballot. Applications must be received by the  election administrator on this date.
  • Monday, Jun 29: First day to vote early in person.
  • Friday, July 10: Last day to vote early in person before Election Day.
  • Tuesday, July 14: Primary Runoff Election Day.

Polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. Mail ballots must be received by the county election administrator by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day, with some exceptions, in order to count.

If you’re unsure of whether there is a runoff election in your district, just check the Candidates tab here at TeachtheVote.org and enter your address. You can also find the full list of runoff races in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

As we’ve previously reported, the low turnout typical of runoff elections means your vote in these races could be the single most influential vote you cast this election season! Consider this: Just 23.8% of registered voters participated in the March 3 primaries this year. That’s fewer than one in four! A little under 9% of voters cast ballots in the 2018 primary runoffs, which included a runoff for a statewide race. That means your vote in a runoff election is more than twice as likely to influence the outcome of an election as it is in a primary. And with the unprecedented level of uncertainty around this election in particular, each vote will represent even more.

Speaking of uncertainty, one of the biggest questions remains whether Texas leaders will provide a safe process for voting while the deadly coronavirus is still in circulation. Many voters have expressed a desire for mail-in voting eligibility to be expanded during the pandemic, but state officials are pushing back against the idea. We are monitoring this topic closely and will post new information here on ATPE’s Teach the Vote blog as developments occur.

Texas election roundup: Texans could face serious decision whether to vote during pandemic

Texas voters may have a difficult decision ahead of them when it comes to casting their ballot in the upcoming runoff elections. It’s one that could have serious implications concerning their health and that of their families.

As Americans continue to practice social distancing to combat the spread of COVID-19, election administrators are looking ahead to how to maintain the democratic process while safeguarding citizens from a disease that has become the second leading cause of death in America. The disease has now killed more Americans in a single month than all flu deaths in the previous year — even with most of the country shut down.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has recommended voting jurisdictions increase the use of mail-in methods of voting in order to minimize the potential for voters to be exposed to the deadly virus, but the expansion of ballot-by-mail to protect voters appears to have become somewhat of a partisan debate.

State law currently allows a voter to mail in an absentee ballot if they are 65 years or older, are disabled, are out of the county on election day and during the period of early voting, or are confined in jail but otherwise eligible. While many states — including those run by Republican governors — have expanded the availability of mail-in voting in order to protect voters, some leaders in Texas are fighting attempts to expand ballot-by-mail and instructing local officials to move forward with in-person voting for the July 14 runoff elections.

The Texas Democratic Party has filed suit in state and federal court arguing that all Texas voters should be allowed to fill out an absentee ballot in order to avoid the potential for infection at a physical polling site. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, a Republican, responded by fighting the lawsuit and threatening voters with criminal penalties, including potential felony charges, if they cast an absentee ballot without meeting the current legal requirements. Last week, a state district judge issued an injunction expanding the use of mail-in ballots to all voters who risk exposure to the coronavirus by voting in person. Paxton is expected to appeal the decision on behalf of the state.

President Donald Trump has led the opposition to his own administration’s recommendations regarding mail-in voting by warning of the potential for fraud. While there are slightly higher rates of mail-in ballot fraud than in-person voter fraud, election experts say both are “extremely rare” and can be prevented. A commission launched by Trump to investigate the president’s allegations of fraud in the 2016 elections disbanded in 2018 after finding “no evidence to support claims of widespread voter fraud.”

The consequences of holding in-person elections during a pandemic have already been demonstrated. In Wisconsin, at least 19 people tested positive for COVID-19 and have linked their exposure to the disease to having voted in person during that state’s April 9 elections.

It’s still unclear how long the COVID-19 threat will linger. While some states appear to be nearing a decline, social distancing guidelines likely will continue to be necessary to ensure progress is not lost. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that a second, “more difficult” wave of COVID-19 could be ahead.

Despite the partisan split among political leaders, popular support behind voting by mail is overwhelming. According to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, 67% of Americans support mail-in ballots for the November elections. Some 58% support changing laws to permanently expand voting by mail.

While Texas’ July 14 primary runoff elections are quickly approaching, Gov. Greg Abbott has remained relatively quiet on the issue of expanding mail-in ballots. If the normal rules remain in effect, Texas voters will face the same choice voters in Wisconsin faced earlier this month: Whether to exercise your right to vote or to protect your health and that of your family.

SBOE formally approves African American studies course

The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) met today to conclude its April meeting, which was conducted virtually over Zoom and covered a pared-down agenda.

The 15 members spent the majority of their time Friday morning adopting final amendments to the state’s first African American studies ethnic studies course. Members approved the new course by a unanimous vote and shared their excitement after completing months of work by the board and stakeholders. Freshman Member Aicha Davis (D-Dallas) was singled out by her colleagues for her role in shepherding the course to completion.

“It’s so rich and it’s something I wish I could have taken when I was young,” said Davis, who thanked Chairman Keven Ellis (R-Lufkin) and former Chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) for getting the ball rolling, as well as the rest of the board members for each taking an active interest in the course. Davis reserved her most heartfelt thanks for her mother and for Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso), who has served as a mentor.

“Y’all have made me a stronger woman,” said Davis. “I just want more kids to have that strength and that empowerment, and I think that’s what this course will do.”

The course will award a half credit for completion, although some board members expressed their wish for a full credit course. Member Pat Hardy (R-Fort Worth) explained that a half credit course would allow more students to enroll.

In other actions, the board assessed liquidated damages worth $113,494 against Origo Education for persistent failure to comply with the rules of a contract to provide math instructional materials. Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff said the noncompliance issue, which involved a failure to provide matching large print and braille materials, did not result in a cost to districts. Staff indicated this is the first time the board has assessed damages against a publisher in this manner.

The company is operating under a six-year contract worth about $10.7 million. The board debated whether to assess the fine from the date the company was originally notified of noncompliance in 2016, which at the $1,000 contractual daily rate for liquidated damages would have increased the fine to $1.3 million. Staff voiced concern over defending the larger fine in court and argued that the more lenient fine would reduce the potential for a court to deem the fine unreasonable.

Member Sue Melton-Malone (R-Waco), who chairs the Committee on Instruction, said the company’s president promised members in Thursday’s committee meeting that the company would pay the $113,494 fine immediately upon receiving an invoice from TEA. The board set a payment deadline of June 1, 2020.

Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund (PSF) Chair Tom Maynard (R-Florence) updated the board on the impact of market volatility due to COVID-19. The fund went from $35.9 billion at the beginning of the year to $31 billion in March. Maynard said 29% of the fund is in a defensive allocation and the portion of the PSF managed by the SBOE is not reliant on energy to the same degree as funds controlled by the School Land Board (SLB). Both of these factors insulated the PSF from some of the shock of the combined market and oil crashes recently. Maynard noted that reporting for real estate and private equity is delayed, so the picture will continue to take shape as more recent data becomes available.

Members ended the meeting by praising educators across the state who continue to work hard to educate Texas students while at home caring for their own families. Member Sue Melton-Malone said she was “blown away” by the job teachers have been doing. Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) noted that many districts, including her own, lack access to the internet. Perez noted the limitations of virtual learning and asked members to remember the needs of homeless and incarcerated students.

The board is expected to convene again in May to take up items that were originally on this week’s agenda but were postponed. No dates for that meeting have been set, but Chairman Ellis said a timeline could be hammered out by next week. ATPE will keep you updated here on Teach the Vote as soon as that information is announced.