Author Archives: ATPE staff

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Feb. 21, 2020

It’s the first week of early voting in Texas! Whether you’ve already voted or are making your plan to vote by March 3, stay up-to-date on the latest education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team.


ELECTION UPDATE: Early voting for the 2020 Texas primary election started this week on February 18, which was also Educator Voting Day. Many counties saw record numbers of voters at the polls on Tuesday. The early voting period ends February 28 and Texas’s primary elections on “Super Tuesday” will be March 3, 2020. If you haven’t made it out to the polls yet, be sure to get the scoop on voting procedures and reminders! (Doesn’t that make you want ice-cream?) Also, check out the latest “Texas election roundup” blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins here.

Why vote in the primaries? ATPE’s lobbyists explained why it’s so important in this “Primary Colors” blog series for Teach the Vote. In many cases, the winning candidate is chosen in the primary rather than in the November general election, as ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell described in Part I of the series (with a list of affected races). In  Part II of “Primary Colors,” ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins explains that for educators who face imminent attacks, it is imperative to show up at the polls and make informed choices so that the next legislative session is as positive as our last.

Read up on the people running for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education this year by viewing their candidate profiles on Teach the Vote, which include responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey. ATPE does not endorse candidates and invites all candidates to participate in our survey project for Teach the Vote. If your favorite candidate has not answered our survey, please let them know it’s not too late! Encourage them to contact ATPE Governmental Relations for additional details.

 

  • Watch this instructional video to learn the different ways you can search for candidate information using Teach the Vote.
  • Learn about the non-binding ballot propositions proposed by the state Democratic and Republican parties that will appear on the primary ballot. These measures don’t affect the law, but they help state party leaders learn more about their voters’ opinions on key issues. Check out this Teach the Vote blog post for more information.
  • Read all the fantastic election features in our latest issue of ATPE News for Spring 2020.
  • Use Vote411.org to build a customized ballot that you can print out and take with you to the polls.
  • Visit TexasEducatorsVote.com to find additional election-related resources created for educators.
  • Find additional election reminders and tips on ATPE’s main blog at atpe.org.

This week, Senator Kirk Watson (D-Austin) announced his plans to resign from the Texas Senate in order to become dean of the University of Houston’s new Hobby School of Public Affairs. Watson has served in the state legislature since being elected to office in 2006, and he was a key member of the Senate Education Committee during the 2019 legislative session. Senator Watson served as mayor of Austin before setting his sights on the legislature. The race to succeed Watson could draw a number of high-profile contenders from the Austin area. State Reps. Donna Howard (D-Austin) and Celia Israel (D-Austin) each indicated this week they are not interested in running for the seat, which is in an overwhelmingly Democratic district. Gov. Greg Abbott will be required to call a special election in order to fill the Senate District 14 vacancy, which could be held on the uniform election dates in May or November of this year.


Two polls of note were released this week that show voter support for public education. A University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll found that Texas voters want increased spending for public education, and lower property taxes, and they believe the quality of Texas public education is excellent or good. Another statewide poll, commissioned by the education-focused non-profit Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation showed that 77% of Texans express trust and confidence in their teachers. Those polled also believe that teacher quality is extremely or very important in overall school quality, teachers are undervalued, teacher pay is too low, standardized tests may not be the best measure of student learning, and public schools have too little money.

These two new Texas polls are consistent with another recent national poll conducted by the National School Boards Action Center, (NSBAC) which we reported on last week. In the NSBAC poll, 64% of the respondents said funding for public schools should be increased, 73% were opposed to public spending on private, religious, and home schools, and 80% expressed favorable opinions of the teachers in their community.


ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified at the Feb. 21, 2020, SBEC meeting.

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today in Austin for its first meeting of the year. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testified to urge the board to use its authority to remedy an unforeseen impact of House Bill (HB) 3 on former Master Teacher certificate holders. Under the bill’s repeal of the Master Teacher certificates, Master Teachers will no longer be able to renew their certificates and may face tricky situations trying to keep their current teaching assignments as a result. HB 3 author Rep. Dan Huberty also sent a letter to the board asking for their help in preserving the classroom expertise of Master Teachers.

Read complete details of the meeting in this comprehensive blog post from Chevalier.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) of Texas Board of Trustees also met this week in Austin, and ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter covered the meetings. Hot topics of discussion at the meetings on Thursday and Friday, February 20-21, 2020, included healthcare for active and retired educators and plans for relocating the TRS agency staff.

Read Exter’s latest blog post for Teach the Vote here for highlights of the meeting.


Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Feb. 14, 2020

While you’re enjoying conversation hearts and sweet notes on this Valentine’s Day, enjoy this week’s Texas education news.

XOXO, from your ATPE Governmental Relations team!


ELECTION UPDATE: Voting in the Texas primary begins in just FOUR days!

Early voting starts February 18, 2020, which is also Educator Voting Day, and ends February 28. Our state’s primary elections on “Super Tuesday” will be March 3, 2020.

Races all over the state are heating up and drawing endorsements. Texas Parent PAC this week released a list of 10 endorsements of pro-public education candidates in contested primaries. Read the entire list and other election news in this week’s election roundup blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Educators face an incredibly important decision in this primary election cycle. The additional funding for schools and educator compensation provided by last year’s House Bill (HB) 3 could easily be taken away in 2021 if educators don’t show up to the polls and vote for pro-public education candidates like they did in 2018. We’re already seeing a renewal of attacks on public schools and educators. It’s important to know your rights when it comes to being an educator and a voter, and this blog post by ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell offers helpful reminders about rules educators should follow during elections.

Read up on the people running for the Texas Legislature or State Board of Education this year by viewing their candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote, which include responses to the ATPE Candidate Survey, legislators’ voting records, campaign contact information, and more. Watch this instructional video to learn the different ways you can search for candidate information using Teach the Vote. ATPE does not endorse candidates and invites all candidates to participate in our survey project and share information for their profiles that appear on Teach the Vote. If your favorite candidate has not answered our survey, please let them know that it’s not too late! Contact ATPE’s GR team for additional details.

There are still some upcoming “For the Future” candidate forums being hosted by the Raise Your Hand Texas Foundation. Click here to find out if there’s an event in your area where you can meet the candidates and hear more about their views on public education. For other resources to help you prepare for early voting, visit TexasEducatorsVote.com.

Finally, be sure to check out the latest issue of ATPE News, our quarterly magazine. The brand new Spring 2020 issue features additional election-related coverage to help you navigate the 2020 primaries.


FEDERAL UPDATE: Earlier this week, President Trump released his budget proposal for 2021. The education portion of the proposal includes plans to consolidate 29 federal education programs, including funding for charter schools and Title I, into a single block grant. While reducing overall funding for the U.S. Department of Education, the plan would increase funding by nearly the same amount in order to pour billions of dollars into a private school voucher program. Read more about the budget proposal in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

In other news this week, the federal government introduced SchoolSafety.gov, which is a new clearinghouse for school safety resources. This bank of resources, meant to aid in all stages of emergency situations, was a joint effort of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Department of Education, Department of Justice, and the Department of Health and Human Services. The website houses a variety of resources relating to bullying, mental health, school security personnel, school climate, action planning, and recovery, among others.


On Thursday, Governor Greg Abbott charged the Tri-Agency Workforce Initiative with building upon the reforms in House Bill (HB) 3 of the 86th Legislature to work towards long-term workforce development in Texas. Gov. Abbott created the initiative in 2016 to help develop links between education and the workforce, with the goal of “helping Texas grow in economic prosperity.” The commissioners of the Texas Education Agency, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and the Texas Workforce Commission who make up the tri-agency initiative submitted a February 2020 report on their progress, which you can read here. According to the governor’s press release issued February 13, 2020, the three agencies will collaborate on a report showcasing strategies to achieve multiple educational and workforce goals. The report will be due to the governor by September 1, 2020. Check out a short summary of the initiative here.


Gary Gates, Lorraine Birabil, and Anna Eastman were sworn in Tuesday as new state representatives for Texas House Districts 28, 100, and 148, respectively. The swearing-in ceremony for Gates and Birabil took place at the Texas State Capitol, while Eastman was sworn in at Waltrip High School in Houston. Elected to replace state representatives who resigned in late 2019, these newly minted legislators will serve up to the start of the 2021 legislative session. All three are on the ballot in 2020, vying for the same House seat to begin a full term in 2021.


A recent national poll conducted by the National School Boards Action Center reflects that likely voters “love” their public schools and oppose public funding of for-profit charters and private schools. Sixty-four percent of the poll respondents said funding for public schools should be increased, with eight in 10 supporting an increase even if it meant an increase in taxes. Seventy-three percent do not want to send public dollars to private, religious, and home schools. Sixty-five percent agree that charter schools need oversight by local school boards and 80% are favorable to teachers in their community. Find the full poll results and a press release here.


National Voter Registration Day is Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019

This Tuesday, September 24, is National Voter Registration Day (NVRD). Started in 2012, NVRD is a national day of recognition dedicated to ensuring that everyone has the opportunity to vote. NVRD, which takes place every fourth Tuesday of September, is a great opportunity for educators to inform students and their parents about the voter registration process. For tips on how to participate in National Voter Registration Day as an educator, ATPE suggests this blog post from the Texas Educators Vote coalition.

The deadline to register to vote for the Nov. 5 constitutional amendment election (which is also the date for some special elections for vacant legislative seats) is Oct. 7. Early voting begins Oct. 21. To learn more about the proposed constitutional amendments on the ballot, read this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. As the 2020 elections grow closer, we’ll continue to post news updates here on our Teach the Vote blog, as well as profiles of the candidates running for seats in the Texas Legislature and State Board of Education. But you can’t vote unless you are registered, so check your voter registration status today and remind your friends to do the same! Here are some helpful links:

  1. Check your voter registration status here to make sure it’s up to date and active.
  2. Click here for a Texas voter registration application that you can print out and mail in. Or use this link to request a voter registration application to be mailed to you.
  3. Send your completed voter registration application to the voter registrar in your county. Find a list of county contacts here.

BREAKING NEWS: Dr. Keven Ellis appointed chair of the State Board of Education

A press statement released earlier today announced that Dr. Keven Ellis of Lufkin has been appointed chair of the State Board of Education. Dr. Ellis assumes the role after the previous chair, Donna Bahorich, served the maximum of two terms over the last 4 years. A Parent PAC endorsee, Dr. Ellis has been a member of the board since 2016 when he won the open seat, vacated by previous board member Thomas Ratliff. Most recently Dr. Ellis represented the Board as the vice chair of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance. The full press release announcing the Governor’s appointment of Dr. Ellis can be found here.

 

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 13, 2019

Here’s this week’s education news wrap-up, courtesy of the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


SBOE Committee on School Initiatives meeting, Sept. 12, 2019

This week, members of the State Board of Education (SBOE) gathered in Austin to hold a series of meetings over Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, which ATPE’s lobbyists have been attending. View the full SBOE agenda and additional information about this week’s meetings here.

To kick things off, the board on Wednesday discussed the Texas Resource Review (TRR) process, formerly known as the Instructional Materials Quality Evaluation (IMQE). Acting as a rubric for instructional materials for English Language Arts and Reading (ELAR) in grades 3-8, the TRR will serve as a type of “consumer reports”  resources for school districts and educators looking for quality instructional materials. Read a full recap of Wednesday’s board meeting in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

Other topics of discussion during this week’s meetings of the board and its committees include a new procedure for nominating members to the School Land Board (SLB), the ed prep assessment pilot known as “EdTPA,” and the Generation 25 charter application that would establish charters with new operators as opposed to letting existing charter holders expand their operations. ATPE’s Wiggins has more on the discussion of these items in this blog post from Thursday.

The board will wrap up its September meetings today. The full board’s agenda for today includes hearing from Commissioner of Education Mike Morath. Read more about his remarks at today’s SBOE meeting, which covered accountability and new reading academy requirements, in this Teach the Vote blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

Commissioner of Education Mike Morath speaking to the ATPE Board of Directors, Sept. 7, 2019

The board also took time today to recognize outgoing chair Donna Bahorich for her leadership with an honorary resolution. This will be the last meeting over which Bahorich will preside, pending the governor’s naming of a new chair for the SBOE.

Related: Commissioner Mike Morath also visited the ATPE Board of Directors meeting in Pflugerville on Sept. 7, 2019. The commissioner updated the board on accountability ratings, discussed the issue of merit pay, and more.


This year’s legislative session saw a slew of bills relating to assessments, from their administration and content to their duration and much more. For an in-depth look at which laws from the 86th session will affect things like end-of-course exams, individual graduation committees (IGCs), and the length of standardized state assessments, check out this week’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier. On Monday, we’ll have a another new post for our ongoing “New School Year, New Laws” weekly series here on Teach the Vote. You can also learn more about many new laws affecting educators in this comprehensive digital guide compiled by ATPE’s legal staff.


The latest iteration of “HB 3 in 30,” the Texas Education Agency’s weekly video series that breaks down the signature education bill of the 86th session, focuses on reading practices. Click here to watch the most recent video and access all the prior videos in the HB 3 in 30 series.


It was announced this week that Harrison Keller will become the new Commissioner of Higher Education, following the recent retirement of Commissioner Raymund Peredes. The announcement came Wednesday after a unanimous vote by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). Keller, who assumes the post on Oct. 1, has worked for the University of Texas and was a longtime education policy adviser to a former Texas Speaker of the House, Rep. Tom Craddick (R-Midland).


ELECTION UPDATE: Yet another big retirement announcement came today with Sen. José Rodriguez (D-El Paso) announcing that he will not seek re-election. An attorney, Sen. Rodriguez has described himself as the first member of his family to attend college. He was first elected to the Senate District 29 seat in 2010 and has also chaired the Senate Democratic Caucus.

Early voting for the upcoming November election begins on Oct. 21, just five weeks from now. For more information about what’s going to be on the ballot, check out our previous Teach the Vote blog posts on proposed constitutional amendments and some special elections that will be taking place on the same day. You can also use the resources provided by the Texas Educators Vote coalition to help ensure you are ready to vote. The deadline to register to vote for the November 5 election is Oct. 7, 2019.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 6, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


In the wake of the tragic shootings in El Paso and Odessa, Gov. Greg Abbott has issued executive orders addressing public safety. While most of the orders focus on improving agency-level responses like developing standardized intake questions and guidelines on when to submit Suspicious Activity Reports, executive orders number five and six deal directly with schools. The orders are as follows:

  • Order No. 5 The Department of Public Safety shall work with the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board on ways to better inform schools, students, staff, and families about the importance of Suspicious Activity Reports and how to initiate that process.
  • Order No. 6 The Department of Public Safety shall work with local law enforcement, mental-health professionals, school districts, and others to create multidisciplinary threat assessment teams for each of its regions, and when appropriate shall coordinate with federal partners.

Learn more about the executive orders in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


Earlier this week U.S. Rep. Bill Flores (R-TX 17) announced that he would not be seeking re-election in 2020. This season has seen the announcement of a number of departures from Capitol Hill as well as many campaign launches. The special elections to fill the seats vacated by Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond), Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston), and Rep. Eric Johnson (D-Dallas) have been set to coincide with voting on the constitutional amendments on Nov. 5th. The deadline to register to vote in the Nov. 5th election is Oct. 7. For more on the races in the upcoming election check out this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. 


Curriculum and instruction is the subject of this week’s installment of ATPE’s blog series, “New School Year, New Laws.” This blog post examines bills such as House Bill 4310 by Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston) which stipulates that sufficient time be given for students to learn the scope and sequence of TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills); and parts of House Bill 3 that provide funding for gifted and talented programs. For the full list of laws visit this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier. 


The latest edition of the Texas Education Agency’s weekly video series, “HB 3 in 30,” covers special education and dyslexia. You can find a link to this week’s video and all previous videos here.


The Teacher Retirement System (TRS) has announced a time frame for retirees to receive their 13th ThinkstockPhotos-465016790_moneycheck. According to the TRS.Texas.gov website, retirees will receive their 13th check on or around Sept. 15, 2019. A list of frequently asked questions about the check can be found here. More of Teach the Vote’s coverage of Senate Bill 12 (the bill responsible for the 13th check) can be found in this blog post by ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter..


 

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 30, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


On Wednesday, Gov. Greg Abbott issued a new report lauding efforts aimed at “Improving School Safety in Texas.” The school safety update details recent legislative and administrative actions taken, including the approval of 17 new laws and $339 million in state funding. Additionally, the report highlights a 37% increase in the number of teachers and school resource officers (SROs) being trained in mental health first aid; improvements to communications between various state agencies that deal with school safety issues; and new authority for charter schools to hire security personnel. Read more about the new report in this blog post from ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter.

Also this week, ATPE’s lobbyists posted the second installment of our “New School Year, New Laws” blog series here on Teach the Vote with a look at school safety legislation. Check out Monday’s blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier to learn more about bills that were passed during the 2019 legislative session to address safety issues such as student mental health, school marshals, and school preparedness for emergencies and traumas. Next week we’ll be posting an update on new laws pertaining to curriculum and instruction.


A product of the 85th Texas Legislature, Senate Bill 1882 that was passed in 2017 allows public schools that are at risk of being shut down to partner with charter schools for turnaround initiatives. In the recently released “A-F” accountability grades for school districts and campuses, seven of the 12 public school campuses that have partnered with charters or nonprofits received an “F” rating.

While it may be too soon to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the partnerships, and there are serious questions about the utility of the A-F system, the accountability ratings offer an early glimpse at how the partnership program is working. Our friend Aliyya Swaby at the Texas Tribune wrote about the findings in this article republished on our Teach the Vote blog this week.


We’ve reached that point in the year when campaign announcements are coming out practically every day. Find out which legislators have announced their re-election bids in our latest election update from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. This week Mark offers insights on the districts where contested races are shaping up and highlights new resources available from the Texas Educators Vote coalition. Read the newest election news roundup here.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) continues its “HB 3 in 30” video series with two new video presentations uploaded this week. The latest entries in the series highlight funding changes under this year’s major school finance and reform bill for charter schools and Gifted and Talented programs. View the HB 3 video resources here.


 

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 23, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Welcome back! A new school year has begun for students and teachers across the state, and all the hard work of buying school supplies and prepping classrooms can finally be put to use. While much attention has been paid to House Bill 3, the school finance reform bill that passed earlier this year, many other bills came out of the 2019 legislative session that educators should get to know.

This week, the ATPE lobby team launched a series called “New School Year, New Laws” here on our Teach the Vote advocacy blog. As a complement to the many other outstanding resources ATPE shares with our members to help them understand their rights and responsibilities as educators, we’re using this new blog series to point out some of the bills going into effect this school year that could have an impact on educators and students. Read our first post in the series here to learn about some new legislation taking effect regarding student discipline. Then check back with TeachtheVote.org every Monday for new posts about education-related bills that passed earlier this year.


ELECTION UPDATE: Earlier this week, Gov. Greg Abbott announced a special election to replace Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston) who will be resigning at the end of September. While special election dates also have been set to fill other seats being vacated, with some taking place on the same day as this November’s constitutional amendment election, several legislators are announcing their intent to run for re-election. Read the latest election-related updates in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins, and watch for more updates in the weeks to come as campaign season ramps up. Back to school can be a busy time for educators. With the registration deadline of Monday, October 7, just six short weeks away, don’t forget to make sure your voter registration is active in time to vote in this November’s election!


The 2019 Texas legislative session was dubbed the “Session of the Teacher” – and it showed. Legislators in both the House and Senate worked together to pass bills that will send billions of dollars to public schools (like House Bill 3) and help shore up the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) (via Senate Bill 12). To keep up the momentum of this year’s session and promote future legislation that benefits public schools, ATPE encourages educators and other public education supporters to share their thanks and feedback with their elected officials. ATPE members can log into Advocacy Central to send a quick and easy thank you message to their legislators and urge their continued dedication to public education. There is still a lot of work to do to ensure the best for our students and educators!


In its latest installment of “HB 3 in 30,” the Texas Education Agency (TEA) has released two new videos, one addressing the topic of the Small/Midsized District allotment and another concerning college, career, and military readiness (otherwise known as CCMR) in high schools. Links to all videos in the series can be found here.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 16, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released its “A-F” accountability ratings for 2019 on Thursday. This year, ratings were released for both districts and campuses. Overall, the percentage of schools rated “A” or “B” has increased since last year. However, several school districts including Houston ISD (the state’s largest) have campuses that will either have to shut down or be run by the state as a result of failing performance that has continued under the new accountability system. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier wrote about the ratings, the history of the A-F system in Texas, and what insight the new school grades may offer in this blog post. For additional coverage, check out this article from the Texas Tribune.


ELECTION UPDATE: Gov. Greg Abbott has set the date for special elections that will fill the seats vacated by Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) and Rep. Eric Johnson (D-Dallas). Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez and State Board of Education member Ruben Cortez (D-Brownsville) announced that they are seeking seats in the U.S. Senate and Texas Senate, respectively. To find out more about the upcoming special elections and campaign news, check out this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has released another video in its “HB 3 in 30” series. This week’s video provides a detailed overview of the “Do Not Hire Registry” and the new reporting requirements for districts and private schools regarding educator misconduct, which now covers non-certified school employees, too. All previous HB 3 in 30 videos and a schedule of upcoming topics can be found here.


Beginning next week, the ATPE lobby team will publish the first in a series of blog posts about what changes you can expect this school year due to recently passed legislation. The series is entitled “New School Year, New Laws,” and it’s designed to help educators know what to expect from the changes made by lawmakers earlier this year. Check back at the beginning of next week here on Teach the Vote for our first post about student discipline-related bills and how they will impact you and your classroom.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 9, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


With back to school starting for millions of Texas students, it is time once again for students and teachers alike to buy school supplies. This weekend is the annual Texas Sales Tax Holiday, or “tax-free weekend,” as it is sometime called. This year’s tax holiday begins today, August 9, and runs through Sunday, August 11. During the holiday you can avoid paying sales tax when you buy most clothing, footwear, school supplies, and backpacks (sold for less than $100) from a Texas retail store or from an online or catalog seller doing business in Texas. ATPE members can also use their OfficeMax/Office Depot discount this weekend for even more combined savings.

Teach the Vote readers may have also heard about a grass roots movement started by teachers called #ClearTheList. Teachers participating in #ClearTheList or #ClearTheListsTexas post school supply wish lists on social media platforms like Facebook or Twitter, and companies or individuals will “clear their list” by purchasing the school supplies for the teacher to use in their classroom. Hopefully the day will come when we fund public schools such that these types of school supply charity drives will not be necessary, but until then – never underestimate the ingenuity or tenacity of a Texas educator to serve his or her students! To participate, type #ClearTheList or #ClearTheListsTexas into the search bar of any social media platform.

 


The Texas Education Agency is continuing to do its deep dives on the myriad new policies created with the passage of House Bill 3 with the release of another video in its “HB 3 in 30” series. This week’s video will dive into the outcomes bonus based on college, career, and military readiness, otherwise known as CCMR. A list of all previous HB 3 in 30 videos, as well as a schedule of upcoming topics, can be found at this link.

 


The movement to repeal the federal Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP), which decreases the Social Security benefits of many hard-working Texas teachers, gained media attention this week. This article by Lorie Konish of CNBC highlights recently introduced legislation by Texas Congressman Kevin Brady (R-The Woodlands) and quotes ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter. Look for more from the press and ATPE as additional bills are filed in Congress and the movement to address the WEP heats up in Washington this fall.

 


The 86th legislative session may have just ended, but that means a new election season is already upon us. Each day it seems that additional lawmakers are announcing their plans to retire as new candidates are announcing their bids to run, either to replace incumbents or for a chance to fill newly opened seats.

Without question, the 2019 legislative session was influenced in a positive way by huge voter turnout among educators and public education allies. If it weren’t for that turnout in 2018, there would likely have been no talk of an increase in teacher pay in 2019. It is critically important for educators to stay engaged this election cycle in order to maintain and improve upon the gains that were made last session, but it is also important for educators and all public servants to make sure they are expressing their political views and encouraging civic engagement among their peers in ways that are ethical and legal.

Thankfully, the Texas Educators Vote coalition, working in coordination with ATPE, has published this handy dos and don’ts guide on civic engagement around Texas elections. As educators head back to school, they can feel confident exercising their right to free speech with the aid of this guide. ATPE encourages members to check out the guide and other resources available from Texas Educators Vote on the coalition’s newly updated website, and be sure to follow Teach the Vote this fall for election updates and information to help educators stay politically active and make informed choices at the polls.

 


ATPE joined legislators and advocates from around the country this week for the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) 2019 Summit in Nashville, Tennessee. This event draws together some of the brightest minds from the U.S. and abroad to discuss policy items of interest to state governments. Education is always a topic of lively discussion, and this year was no different.

Among the topics discussed were ongoing efforts to ensure all students are provided with an equally high quality of education, regardless of race or socioeconomic status. This continues to be a challenge in Texas and other states, where great disparities continue to exist both across and within school district boundaries. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 that laws passed to racially segregate schools were unconstitutional. Yet the Court’s decision in Milliken v. Bradley in 1974 essentially allowed segregation to continue as long as it is not explicitly intentional. The result has been de facto racial and socioeconomic segregation that continues in many parts of the state today, despite decades of efforts and lawsuits intended to achieve the original aim of integration.

Attendees also discussed efforts to improve the future of education, which includes working with employers to emphasize the role of the education system in creating the workforce of the future. How well we do at preparing future workers has a direct impact on the overall economy. Like Texas in 2018, many states have recently launched commissions to study ways to improve the public education system. The findings of these commissions are unsurprisingly similar to the results found by the Texas Commission on Public School Finance. For example, a commission launched by the state of Maryland found that investing in early education and better compensation for educators are both critical components of building a high-achieving education system. There is now a mounting body of evidence across the United States supporting these core determinations.