Author Archives: Andrea Chevalier

Census workers are knocking

U.S. Census Bureau

Recently, my family has encountered census workers who are trying to make sure our neighbors are counted by the September 30 census deadline. During a pandemic and an era of misinformation and distrust, you may find yourself cautious during such meetings. This feeling is completely understandable. However, armed with information and a commitment to helping others get counted in the 2020 Census, we can all work together to make sure Texas receives its fair share of federal funding for roads, schools, healthcare, representation in Congress, and much more.

A few weeks ago, I was playing in the front yard with my toddler when a census worker (who had been sitting in a running car for quite some time) asked if a “Nicole” lived in our house. I recognized the U.S. Census badge and other materials he had marked with the “2020 Census” logo. I replied, “No,” and he said that maybe they were at our neighbor’s house. I knew, however, that our neighbor had already filled out their census because we talked about it months ago. He talked to my neighbor, got the information he needed, yelled across the yard to me to tell me about how he hadn’t gotten to see his newly-born grandchild yet, and drove off.

The U.S. Census Bureau has detailed information on what to expect from census takers in your neighborhood and what to look for to verify their identity. And, here are some common reasons why those who have already responded to the 2020 Census may be visited by a census worker.

In another instance, my husband opened the door one evening to a woman who held up her badge and informed him she worked for the U.S. Census Bureau. She asked my husband how many people lived in the house across the street, if the house was rented or owned, and whether they were Hispanic. Soon, the neighbor in question pulled in to their driveway. The census worker rushed to their house, but, according to my husband, the neighbors quickly got back into their car and drove off. My husband felt uncomfortable about the encounter with the census worker, but the practice of using “proxy sources” to get basic information about non-responsive households is not uncommon.

According to a U.S. Census Bureau press release on door-to-door non-response follow-ups from the:

Census takers will go to great lengths to ensure that no one is missed in the census. After exhausting their efforts to do an in-person interview with a resident of an occupied housing unit, they will seek out proxy sources — a neighbor, a rental agent, a building manager or some other knowledgeable person familiar with the housing unit — to obtain as much basic information about the occupants as they can.

Some are concerned with the safety of participating in the 2020 Census. How will the information be used? Will it be used against me? This “Fighting Rumors” page provides information useful for educating yourself (and others) on how census data is used and not used. Most importantly, without an accurate count, especially of children, Texas risks adequate funding for essential funding streams that impact public schools, school nutrition programs, child care, special education, and much more.

One-third of households in Texas (roughly 31%) have been counted through the “boots-on-the-ground” efforts of census takers during the non-response follow-up (NRFU) process. Through these efforts, Texas is now just under the national average of enumerated households, at 92.4% compared to 93.0%.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 11, 2020

Here is a look at this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: The Texas Education Agency (TEA) adapted its guidance on equitable services this week to reflect a recent U.S. District Court ruling vacating the U.S. Department of Education’s interim final rule that directs public school districts to spend an unprecedented amount of taxpayer dollars on private school students. The court ruling issued last Friday makes the department’s rule unenforceable nationwide, but Secretary Betsy DeVos still has time to appeal the decision.

TEA also updated several other sections of its COVID-19 Support and Guidance page, including new intern and emergency certification waiver information that continues the suspensions on face-to-face requirements for candidates completing their internships, clinical experiences, field-based experiences, and practicums. Also, be sure to check out the new Project Restore training on resilience that was posted this week.

ATPE State Treasurer Jayne Serna and ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier participated in an educators’ town hall on COVID-19 and teaching this week. The Wednesday night event was hosted by U.S. Congressional District 10 candidate and former teacher Mike Seigel. Serna was the opening speaker for the event, sharing the difficulties educators are facing this school year and highlighting the importance of voting to elect pro-public education candidates. Chevalier provided an overview of COVID-19-related federal funding issues facing educators and students, federal waivers, and the need for congressional oversight of the U.S. Department of Education and Secretary Betsy DeVos.

Also this week, ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter spoke with The Texas TribuneThe Dallas Morning News, and KBMT’s 12 News Now about the current state of teaching, learning gaps, and how spending cuts prompted by COVID-19 could impact students.

As a reminder, ATPE offers educators a gamut of resources:

  • Find answers from our legal team to frequently asked questions on our COVID-19 FAQs and Resources page.
  • Earn CPE by watching informative webcasts on topics such as educator rights, leave options, disability accommodations, and school safety through ATPE’s professional learning portal.
  • Explore an interactive pandemic timeline.
  • Take our survey on parent-teacher collaboration.
  • ATPE members only: Use Advocacy Central to communicate with elected officials about your concerns.

ELECTION UPDATE: Don’t let the November 3 general election creep up on you. Election Day is less than eight weeks away and early voting starts in one month. This means other deadlines for registering to vote or requesting a ballot-by-mail are even sooner! Remember that if you have moved recently or changed your name, you need to update your voter registration. Here are important dates to add to your calendar:

  • September 19: If your vote-by-mail application is received by this day, you are guaranteed to receive your ballot at least 30 days before Election Day.
  • September 22: National Voter Registration Day
  • October 5: Deadline to register to vote
  • October 13: First day of early voting
  • October 19: Educator Voting Day
  • October 23: Last day that a vote-by-mail application can be received (not postmarked)
  • October 30: Last day of early voting
  • November 3: Election Day! Mail-in ballots also must be received by this date.

If you happen to live in Texas Senate District 30 and are a registered voter, you’ll be eligible to vote early starting Monday, Sept. 14, for the special election to replace Sen. Pat Fallon (R-Prosper). Read more about the race in this previous blog post, and check out profiles of the SD 30 candidates here on Teach the Vote.


FEDERAL UPDATE: In addition to the above-mentioned court ruling against Secretary Betsy DeVos’s effort to send more public money to private schools, there was activity on Capitol Hill this week. U.S. Senate Republicans tried unsuccessfully to advance a new coronavirus aid package that included a $10 billion private school voucher provision. ATPE released a press statement opposing the voucher language in the Senate bill, which failed during a preliminary vote held in the Senate yesterday. Read more about the legislation and ATPE’s press statement in this blog post by ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell.


The State Board of Education (SBOE) met this week to take up hefty agenda items including the revision of science, physical education, and health curriculum standards (TEKS). The revisions garnered hours of testimony from the public, as did the discussion of eight new charter applications before the board.

ATPE and other organizations urged the board to reject the new charters due to the increased costs the state would incur by granting the applications. SBOE Member Ruben Cortez asked Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath, “Is now the time to be playing Shark Tank?” Read this week’s blog posts from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins to learn more about Morath’s defense of the charter applicants, the board’s Thursday split decisions to preliminarily approve just six of the proposed charters, and the ultimate veto of three charter operators during Friday’s full board meeting.


Per usual, the annual Texas Tribune Festival has an impressive education strand of events. This week, Texas Tribune education reporter Aliyya Swaby moderated a panel of Texas public school teachers, superintendents, and Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath. The teachers expressed how the pandemic impacted their interactions with students, the superintendents talked about budget and enrollment concerns, and Morath stuck to his usual admiration of data and the need to continue standardized testing. Read more in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


The Texas Senate Democratic Caucus incorporated ATPE recommendations regarding COVID-19 and schools into a letter it sent to TEA Commissioner Mike Morath earlier this week. The letter was influenced by a task force of education stakeholders including ATPE. Among other requests, the senators’ letter urges Morath to seek a waiver of federal testing and accountability requirements for 2020-21. Read more in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


Did you know that high schools are legally required to offer students who will be age 18 by election day the opportunity to register to vote? In Texas, students may register to vote at 17 years 10 months. Students can print, fill out, and mail in an application obtained from VoteTexas.gov or fill out a voter registration application online and have it mailed to them.

The National Association of Secondary School Principals has partnered with dosomething.org to create the “Democracy Powered by (You)th” voter registration competition. By doing things like racking up voter registrations, students can win scholarships, school grants, and trophies. Pace High School in Brownsville, TX is currently in third place!



Today we remember the tragic events of September 11, 2001. On that day, some of our members were in the classroom as teachers, while others were still just students themselves. On this Patriot Day, we honor the lives lost that day and the heroic efforts by first responders, service members, and citizens who risked their lives that day and in the aftermath of the tragedy. We will never forget.

Teachers, superintendents, and commissioner speak at Tribune Festival

The Texas Tribune is holding its annual Texas Tribune Festival this month. Rather than an in-person event jam-packed with speakers over a few days, this year’s festival is taking place virtually throughout the entire month of September. The event still features a prominent strand of panels and interviews related to education. A session held this morning, “Public Education in the Time of COVID,” featured two teachers, two superintendents, and Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath. Here’s what the panelists had to say.

No more high-fives or cozy reading corners. Texas public school teachers Paige Stanford (Waco ISD) and Ale Checka (Forth Worth ISD) are optimistic about the school year and simultaneously saddened by the lack of physical interaction they anticipate having with their students. Both teachers highlighted how the pandemic has changed their community, from inspiring more empathy to creating traumatic situations. In Stanford’s school district, she said, “the streets went empty,” when Waco ISD principal Phillip Perry passed away from COVID-19, but Stanford added that students are now excited to help others by wiping down their desks after class. A shift in attitudes has impacted teachers, too. Checka said she, “will never forget or forgive the way that state leadership has tried everything possible for us to not be able to follow local public health guidelines.”

Superintendents Dr. LaTonya Goffney (Aldine ISD) and Dr. Michael Hinojosa (Dallas ISD) were each in different stages of reopening their districts for instruction, but both expressed that assessment will be key in determining how to support students and fill in learning gaps from the spring. Since Aldine ISD has already started instruction, Goffney was able to confirm that enrollment in the district has declined by about 3,500 students (out of 67,200), with more than 50% of the decline occurring in pre-Kindergarten. This comment trends with other anecdotes gathered by ATPE, which suggest parents are choosing to keep their children out of optional grades such as pre-K and Kindergarten. Goffney said her district is trying to identify students who are not showing up to school, but many students are impacted by policy changes outside of the school’s purview, such as the rental assistance program in the Houston area.

Both superintendents on today’s panel said their districts spent millions of unanticipated dollars on personal protective equipment (PPE), cleaning supplies, sanitizer, plexiglass, face shields, masks, misters, food, and devices to keep students safe and learning. Aldine ISD spent $10 million while Dallas ISD spent $31 million. Many of these costs will be reimbursed at 75% through the Coronavirus Relief Fund, while others will be handled through the state’s Operation Connectivity program. In the long-term, Hinojosa said he is concerned about being able to maintain many of the programs his district offers.

It would have been nice for Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath to respond directly to some of the comments made by the teachers and superintendents, as would have been possible in a regular in-person panel. However, the answers he provided to moderator and Texas Tribune education reporter Aliyya Swaby did shed some light on important policy topics, such as accountability.

It is no secret that Morath loves data, as it undergirds all of his discussions. Much like they did in the spring, Texas school districts will use existing data reporting systems to track where students are receiving instruction. The commissioner said we are about two or three weeks away from being able to look at this data, but Morath noted that it seems the majority of students are in remote instructional settings. This is despite the fact that the “overwhelming majority” of districts, according to Morath, are offering in-person instruction.

With regard to standardized testing and accountability, Morath expressed his view that most people want more data during a pandemic, not less. The commissioner said assessing expectations of students is still important for ensuring they are meeting milestones for success later in life. Morath believes the STAAR tests are an accurate gauge for mastery, which then provide educators with information on who needs extra support so that we can help students reach their potential. These comments reflect the commissioner’s views of assessment as a diagnostic tool, which Morath spoke about during an SBOE meeting earlier this year.

The commissioner stressed that the state tests use data on student growth over the course of the year and that parents still deserve to know that information about their school. ATPE and many others have questioned whether any growth measures will be accurate this year, given the loss of learning in the spring during COVID-19 school closures, rapid transitions to remote learning, and the loss of contact with 11% of students. Nevertheless, Morath didn’t indicate any easing up on district and campus accountability ratings using the test scores, saying the data will help to identify best practices of those who do well during the pandemic. Unscientifically identifying some things that work during one year of an exceptional time might satisfy the curiosity of some, but at what expense to schools and districts that experience negative accountability interventions and sanctions due to a pandemic?

Morath closed out his remarks by expressing satisfaction with the amount of money that had been allocated to districts to mitigate COVID-19 costs and pay for closing the digital divide. He also expressed hope that public health data expected to be posted toward the end of September will help the state identify if there is viral spread in schools.

The Texas Tribune Festival continues through Sept. 30, and it includes numerous free events that are available to stream right now. As usual, the festival features specially priced educator and student tickets, which provide full access at a fraction of the cost. Nearly all of the festival events, including this morning’s education panel, are available for replay on demand for ticket holders who may have missed previous events.

TEA adds “Project Restore” trauma training to COVID-19 resources

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has launched a trauma-informed training webinar series called “Project Restore.” The series of videos, only the first of which is posted for now, is meant to help teachers learn about trauma and apply the training in practice with their own students, as well as to combat their own stress. The second video in the series, set to be released September 10, is specifically about helping educators reflect and work through the effects of the pandemic on their lives. The trainings offer Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits and count for the trauma-informed training requirements of Senate Bill 11 passed by the 86th Texas Legislature in 2019.

Other significant updates to TEA’s COVID-19 Support and Guidance web page this week include minor updates to the agency’s public health guidance document to more clearly define the phrase “on-campus” for purposes of reporting cases; presence on a school bus is included in the definition. The agency also made its regular and continual updates to the Texas Home Learning website. Updates were also made to TEA’s remote instruction guidance and attendance and enrollment FAQ to clarify how asynchronous instruction works for students who do not have access to Internet or devices. Lastly, the federal funding and grants FAQ on the agency’s website newly explains that school districts are allowed to keep migrant students enrolled throughout the year.

As always, please visit ATPE’s frequently-updated COVID-19 FAQs and Resources web page for Texas educators for additional, up-to-date information.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 28, 2020

Back-to-school is in full gear for more districts across Texas, while others will not begin until after Labor Day. Whether you’re back in class or still getting ready to meet your new students,  check out this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released official correspondence this week detailing the new COVID-19 case reporting requirements for on-campus students, staff, and teachers in schools. Weekly public reporting of the data on the Department of State Health Services website is expected to start at the end of September. TEA also updated several of its resources this week, including a language change on how districts should determine confirmed COVID-19 cases. For more detail, read ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier’s blog post.

ATPE’s COVID-19 FAQs and Resources page is always a good resource for educators looking for commonly asked questions and answers that our Member Legal Services team facilitates. Some topics have even been recorded as extremely informative webcasts – catch our educator rights webcast here and our more recent webcast on leave options and disability accommodations here. ATPE members can also use Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials . Don’t forget to take our survey on parent-teacher collaboration!


ELECTION UPDATE:  The race to fill Texas Senate District 30 heated up this week with three candidates making announcements that they plan to vie for the seat. The deadline to file is 5 p.m. today, Aug. 28.  If you live in this northeast Texas district, be sure to stay abreast of the news and get ready to vote in the special election on September 29! In other news, U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy provided testimony before Congress this week, defending his decisions impacting the speed and reliability of the USPS during a critical election year. Read more about these developments in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


School choice is emerging as a top talking point as the presidential election nears. The Trump campaign and numerous speakers at the Republican National Convention touted school choice this week, some even echoing the dubious statement that school choice is the “civil rights” issue of our time. While Trump says he will push for a national school voucher program, Biden makes clear that he opposes diverting public dollars from public neighborhood schools to private institutions. Read more about ATPE’s stance on the privatization of public education in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


ATPE launched a new COVID-19 timeline this week that includes top events related to the pandemic and Texas education, from the federal level all the way down to certain school districts. The events start in early March and conveniently link to news articles and blog posts here on Teach the Vote. Read more about the timeline in this blog post by ATPE staff.

 


Laura Yeager

Public education advocate and parent Laura Yeager contributed a guest post to Teach the Vote this week on the importance of reliable and consistent funding for public schools. Even with the cost of education rising during the pandemic (think more PPE, cleaning, devices, etc.), districts will only be held harmless for drops in attendance for the first 12 weeks of this school year. A lack of consistent funding after this “COVID-19 cliff” puts our public schools and the communities they serve at great risk.


This week ATPE submitted public comments on proposed rules that would eliminate the expiration date on “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. The State Board for Educator Certification’s (SBEC) proposed rules would fix the unintended consequences of last year’s House Bill 3, which have put some educators’ teaching assignments in jeopardy. Read more about the issue in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

COVID case reporting in schools and more updates from TEA

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released official correspondence today detailing COVID-19 case reporting in schools.

As we reported here on Teach the Vote last week, TEA is coordinating with the Department of Health State Services (DSHS) to collect and disseminate weekly case information on test-confirmed COVID-19 infections in students, teachers, and staff who participate in on-campus activities. School districts will be expected to report data on confirmed cases beginning with the first day of instruction and will begin their weekly submissions September 8. DSHS will report weekly positive case numbers at the district level starting at the end of September.

Districts will be required to provide information such as what campus reported the infection and whether it was a student, teacher, or staff member. Districts must also report what action was taken in response to the infection. In addition to COVID cases, TEA is asking districts to report enrollment data for the first and fourth weeks of school. This data is meant to give TEA an idea how many students are on campus in order to provide context to the case reporting.

TEA also updated several other resources on their COVID-19 webpage this week, including minor changes to COVID-19 public health orders. the term “lab-confirmed” was revised to “test-confirmed” to acknowledge the increased use of on-sight rapid testing, which does not always require a test to be sent off to a lab in order to get a result. The agency also updated resources for special education and special populations, including resources for highly mobile and at-risk students, English learners, and G/T students. Texas Home Learning resources were also updated.

Also of note, the deadline for school districts to apply for Coronavirus Relief Funds (CRF) is quickly approaching (September 30). The CRF, established through the CARES Act and administered by the Texas Department of Emergency Management (TDEM), provides up to 75% reimbursement for allowable expenses from March 1 through March 20, 2020. TDEM has advised that in order to complete the application process by September 30, districts will likely need to have completed the first step of registering an account by September 7.

As always, the ATPE Coronavirus FAQ and Resources are frequently updated and available for public use. Recent updates include an interactive timeline of COVID-19 developments and webcasts with ATPE’s legal services team.

ATPE supports lifetime Legacy Master Teacher certificates

Today, August 26, 2020, ATPE submitted public comments to the Texas Education Agency and the State Board of Education (SBEC) in support of a proposed rule change that would help Legacy Master Teachers (formerly “Master Teachers”) maintain their teaching positions.

As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, House Bill (HB) 3 of the 87th Texas legislature eliminated the ability of SBEC to issue or renew the Master Teacher (MT) certificates. In February, Chairman Huberty (R-Kingwood), author of HB 3, notified SBEC that this change was intended only to avoid confusion with the bill’s “master” teacher designations and was not meant to harm the employment of Master Teacher certificate holders. SBEC swiftly took action, requesting that TEA draft a rule to fix the issue.

The proposed rules are open for public comment through September 21. If approved at the October SBEC meeting and subsequent November SBOE meeting, the rules will effectively transition Legacy Master Teachers into lifetime certificate status. The rule update will allow Legacy Master Teachers to keep and/or obtain teaching assignments that require the Legacy Master Teacher certificate. If you are a Legacy Master Teacher or have a stake in the issue, submit a comment here!

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 21, 2020

For many of you, it’s the end of back-to-school week. While this week may not have been normal or ideal, we know the bumpy road ahead will be navigated by the best experts in the land – educators! Read this week’s education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


CORONAVIRUS UPDATE: The Texas Education Agency (TEA) made news this week with a long-awaited announcement yesterday that there will be some data collection and reporting on COVID-19 cases in schools. TEA also updated its COVID-19 resource page to include guidance (also long-awaited) on promoting educator well-being. Read ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter’s blog post on these developments for more detail.

This week, ATPE hosted its second free legal webcast on COVID-19 issues facing school employees. In the presentation ATPE Managing Attorney Paul Tapp gives an overview of available accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, paid and unpaid leave options, and more. Find the latest webcast here. To watch our first legal webinar on educators’ rights and COVID-19, click here.

As always, we encourage you to check out ATPE’s comprehensive COVID-19 FAQs and Resources page for recent answers to common questions from educators and links to other helpful information. Also read ATPE’s tips on getting ready for the new school year here on the main ATPE blog. ATPE members can also use Advocacy Central to communicate with their elected officials regarding concerns about school reopening and other issues. Finally, we invite both educators and parents to take our survey on parent-teacher collaboration.


ELECTION UPDATE: U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy announced this week that policy changes to the U.S. Postal Service will not be implemented before the November election. The Democratic National Convention also took place this week, resulting in the final nomination of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris to the November presidential ticket. The Republican National Convention takes place next week. Read more about these developments in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


Public comment is now open on proposed State Board for Educator Certification rules that will provide a fix for Master Teacher certificate holders who are facing the expiration of their certificate, potentially putting their teaching assignments in jeopardy. The proposed rules would eliminate the expiration date on non-renewable “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. Read more about the issue and ATPE’s months-long advocacy efforts on behalf of master teachers in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


The Texas House Public Education Committee posted five formal requests for information this week. Several House committees are issuing the public requests for information in lieu of holding in-person hearings on their interim charges. Anyone can submit information, due by September 30. Get more detail on the requests in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


On Tuesday, our country observed the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, securing women’s right to vote. Read more about the history of the amendment and the role teachers played in its passage in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


Master Teacher rule fix opens for public comment

After months of advocacy by ATPE, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) tentatively agreed upon a proposed rule that will eliminate the expiration date of “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates, allowing certificate holders to maintain their teaching assignments obtained by virtue of their Master Teacher certificate. This proposed rule opens for public comment today, August 21, through September 21, 2020. If you’re interested or have a stake in the issue, please share your voice! Find the public comment notice and link to submit a comment here.

Here’s some history on the topic and advocacy ATPE has done:

The 86th Texas legislature passed House Bill (HB) 3, an enormous school finance package that provided billions in funding to public schools across the state. The bill created the Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA), a program designed to provide funding to districts tied to a teacher “designation” based on his or her performance. The highest designation under this program was labeled “Master Teacher.” In order to avoid confusion with existing certificates for Master Reading, Science, Math, and Technology Teachers, HB 3 repealed of the authorizing statutes for all the Master Teacher certificates.

That repeal took effect September 1, 2019. The implementation of the repeal meant that the SBEC could no longer issue or renew Master Teacher certificates and that the certificates would now be called “Legacy Master Teacher” certificates. Master Teachers were faced with the prospect of losing both their certificate and their assignment. It was a tricky situation that needed to be solved.

ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier testifies at the July SBEC meeting.

ATPE has advocated on behalf of Master Teachers over the past year to solve this issue. We have worked with TEA staff and SBEC board members and have provided testimony at the October 2019, December 2019, February 2020, May 2020, and July 2020 SBEC meetings in support of a fix. In January, we submitted public comment on the four-year rule review of the chapter in the Texas Administrative Code that formerly housed the Master Teacher certificate rules, imploring SBEC to take action.

ATPE also secured a letter from Chairman Dan Huberty that was delivered to SBEC members at the very moment ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier was testifying at the February 2020 SBEC meeting. The letter explained that the intent of the repeal was only to avoid confusion with the new and unrelated master teacher designation created by HB 3 as part of the TIA; the repeal was not meant to harm the employment prospects of current educators. In April, ATPE sent a letter letter to Gov. Greg Abbott expressing our appreciation for his interest in the issue.

Through these efforts, we have reached the final stages of fixing this unintended consequence for nearly 5,000 Texas educators. After public comment, the rule will be up for final adoption at the October SBEC meeting and, if approved, will also be reviewed by the State Board of Education. If ultimately approved, the rule is expected to take effect by the end of the 2020 calendar year.

House Public Education committee posts formal requests for information

House Public Education Committee meeting, Oct. 28, 2019.

We won’t see familiar images of the Texas House Public Education Committee meeting in person anytime soon. In accordance with procedures released in July for carrying out “distanced” interim committee business during the pandemic, the committee posted five formal requests for information on Wednesday and Thursday of this week. Four of the requests reflect the interim charges assigned to the committee by House Speaker Dennis Bonnen, while the fifth request relates to COVID-19. Anyone can submit information to the committee by September 30, 2020. Here is a summary of the requests:

1: The committee seeks information related to interim charge 1, which is related to monitoring and oversight of relevant agencies, programs, and the implementation of a slew of bills passed in recent legislative sessions. These include bills and rule-making related to school finance (House Bill 3, mentor teacher allotment, teacher incentive allotment, etc.), accountability and testing (STAAR, A-F ratings, district-charter partnerships), and school safety and mental health in schools. The formal request also includes several questions that the committee seeks answers to that largely relate to school finance, including a specific emphasis on teacher pay, and the efficacy of charter schools and district-charter partnerships.

2: This request seeks information related to interim charge 2, which seeks to determine barriers to providing a digital learning environment for all children. Specific questions related to this request ask where gaps in internet coverage exist and how internet providers may fill these gaps.

3: With regard to interim charge 3, the committee is seeking information related to the Texas Education Agency’s compliance with the U.S. Department of Education in correcting their errors related to special education. This includes the implementation of TEA’s Special Education Strategic Plan and other requirements the state has come out of compliance with, such as annual maintenance of financial support.

4: This request will not likely apply to many educators and the general public, as it is related to the committee’s fourth interim charge of monitoring the State Auditor’s review of agencies and programs.

COVID-19: The committee has posted seven questions to gather information on the pandemic. These include whether public schools are ensuring the health and safety of students, what plans are in place for on-campus COVID-19 testing, what plans are being made for athletics this fall, what projected enrollment might look like for 2020-2021, whether there is a noticeable impact on staff retention, if funding has already been impacted, and how the pandemic has specifically impacted the finances of small and rural school districts.

ATPE encourages educators to participate in this information-gathering process. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for more information and news on ATPE’s submissions to the committee and other House committees that have requested education-related information.