Texas election roundup: Early voting begins Monday, June 29

Early voting begins Monday, June 29, 2020, for the July 14 primary runoff elections across the state of Texas, as well as for a special election to fill an open Texas Senate seat in Central Texas.

Gov. Greg Abbott postponed the runoff elections three months ago from their original May 26 election date over concerns about the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. Infections today are even higher than they were back then, which highlights the importance of making a plan to vote safely.

As we previously reported here on Teach the Vote, the Texas Secretary of State last month released a list of “minimum recommended health protocols” for voting, which instructs voters to consider maintaining six feet of separation, self-screen, bring their own stylus or pencil with eraser, bring hand sanitizer, and wear a mask when they head to the polls. For those experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, voters are encouraged to consider utilizing curbside voting if they meet the eligibility requirements. Curbside voting is typically reserved for voters with disabilities who are not physically able to enter polling locations without assistance or who may be likely to injure their health by doing so.

Texas polling places must offer curbside voting for certain individuals who are unable to enter a polling location due to a disability. The Secretary of State’s website explains, “If a voter is physically unable to enter the polling place, he or she may ask that an election officer bring a ballot to the entrance of the polling place or to a car at parked at the curbside. After the voter marks the ballot, they will give it to the election officer, who will put it in the ballot box. Or, at the voter’s request, a companion may hand the voter a ballot and deposit it for him or her.” The Secretary of State’s office suggests checking your county’s voting website and calling ahead to the polling location before voting curbside. You can read more about curbside voting in this post by Disability Rights Texas.

The Secretary of State’s office offered additional info on curbside voting and voting by mail in a webinar hosted earlier this month by the Texas League of Women Voters. State officials emphasized that if a voter has voted by mail in the past and their qualifying circumstances have not changed, they can still vote by mail.

With the possibility of a greater number of voters choosing to vote curbside and fewer election volunteers working at polling places due to the coronavirus pandemic, early voting and allowing ample time to cast your vote is extra important for this runoff. The Texas League of Women Voters recommends voting early during non-peak hours in order to encounter the fewest people possible. The Secretary of State’s office also recently reiterated the importance of voting early and following the health and safety protocols, stating, “It is essential to our democracy that Texans are able to safely and confidently cast their vote.”

Multiple lawsuits have been filed aimed at expanding the ability of Texans to vote by mail, as some voters feel they must make a choice this year between exercising their civic duty by voting and protecting their health and that of their families. The fact remains that voting is the single most powerful way to ensure elected officials prioritize public education, listen to educators, and put children first. The decision of whether to cast your vote is yours alone, and we recognize the courage it takes to participate in democracy at this unprecedented moment in history. We urge you to follow all of the safety precautions to protect yourself while you exercise this most critical constitutional right.

As a reminder, early voting runs June 29 – July 10, 2020. Check out ATPE’s profiles of candidates for the Texas Legislature and State Board of Education here on Teach the Vote.

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