Category Archives: TEA

TEA submits ESSA plan for review

tea-logo-header-2The Texas Education Agency (TEA) submitted Texas’s final plan to satisfy the new federal education law, the Every Students Succeeds Act (ESSA), on Monday. Submission of the plan triggered a 120-day window for the U.S. Dept of Education LogoU.S. Department of Education (ED) to review Texas’s proposal, a process that includes conducting a peer review and an evaluation by ED staff, primarily to ensure our state’s compliance with statutory requirements.

ATPE weighed in with input on the draft Texas plan during the public comment period last month. The plan saw some changes prior to submission to ED, but is largely similar to the draft plan that received public comment. ESSA provided flexibility to states in terms of using federal money to foster innovative approaches to accountability and assessments, among other areas covered under the law. Texas’s plan takes advantage of only some of that flexibility.

More on the final Texas ESSA plan and additional information on ESSA in Texas can be found at TEA’s ESSA web page. All states were required to submit final plans to ED this month (both Alabama and Texas received a deadline extension due to timing of hurricanes and hurricane recovery efforts).

TEA offers educators access to sample STAAR parent portal

tea-logo-header-2The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released information this week for educators interested in better understanding the agency’s website, TexasAssessment.com, which aims to provide more information on the STAAR test to parents and educators.

In addition to accessing the website through the teacher and analytical portals, educators now have the opportunity to see aspects of the site from a parent’s point of view, a perspective TEA hopes will aid educators as they converse with parents who might have questions about the Twebsite or student/parent portal.

Educators can utilize these sample parent credentials to log on to the student/parent portal and navigate through examples of what family members and students experience when visiting the site. The sample credentials offer educators access to example results for multiple grades and subjects. This list of frequently asked questions by parents also aims to help educators prepare for conversations with parents regarding the new website and portal.

Visit TexasAssessments.com today for more.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Sept. 15, 2017

Catch up on the latest education news this week from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:

 


ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter snapped a photo with Rikki Bonet, an ATPE member serving on the SBOE Long-Range Plan Steering Committee, Sept. 12, 2017.

ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter visited with Rikki Bonet, an ATPE member serving on the SBOE Long-Range Plan Steering Committee, Sept. 12, 2017.

The State Board of Education (SBOE) met this week in Austin. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins attended all the proceedings and reported on them for our blog here and here. The board took steps to implement changes made by legislation earlier this year, such as a bill to allow certain computer science courses to satisfy other core curriculum requirements. SBOE members also heard an update from Commissioner of Education Mike Morath about the impacts of Hurricane Harvey on schools and students.

One day prior to the board’s meetings, the SBOE’s new Long-Range Plan Steering Committee held its first meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 12. Read about the committee and its initial discussions in this blog post from earlier this week.

 


As Texans deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, Texas House Speaker Joe Straus (R-San Antonio) has directed some legislative committees to study issues connected to the deadly storm. In new hurricane-related interim charges released this week, Speaker Straus is directing the House Committees on Appropriations, Natural Resources, and Public Education to hold hearings to study and make recommendations to help the state deal with the effects of the storm. The Public Education Committee will discuss the issues of displaced students, financial losses for schools, and avoiding punitive accountability outcomes as a result of the storm. For more on the interim charges, check out this week’s blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann.

ATPE members are reminded of resources available on our Hurricane Harvey page. Find additional hurricane-related information on the TEA website here.

 


This week ATPE learned of an e-mail phishing scam that is targeting educators around the state. ATPE and the Texas Education Agency both issued warnings on Sept. 14, 2017, urging educators not to respond to the fraudulent emails, which falsely claim to be generated by ATPE and TEA. The emails are geared toward collecting sensitive, personal information from individual teachers, and they claim to offer participants a chance to attend an expense-paid workshop hosted by ATPE and TEA, which does not exist. The agency quickly issued a press release warning that the emails are illegitimate and not being sent by TEA or ATPE. For our part, ATPE sent a warning out to all of our members in yesterday’s e-newsletter. Read TEA’s press release here.

 


 

SBOE wraps quiet September meeting

The State Board of Education met Friday to conclude its September meeting in Austin. After recognizing the 2017 Heroes for Children award recipients, the board heard public comments and took up the agenda.

The board swiftly moved though items from the Committee on Instruction that removed duplicative rules regarding certain science classes and an amendment changing the amount of credit offered for extended practicum in fashion design. Members approved a measure from the Committee on School Finance/Permanent School Fund to update the rule to comply with the Texas Tax Code regarding the definitions used for tax collections to calculate state aid under the Texas Education Code.

The board approved an item from the Committee on School Initiatives that would expand the commissioner’s ability to dismiss or decline to recertify hearing examiners, as well as an item that clarifies policies regarding late renewals of educator certifications. The board took no action on an item that would make adjustments to the qualifications for educators whose degree was earned outside the United States.

Member Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands) updated the board on the first meeting of the Long-Range Plan Steering Committee, which Cargill chairs. The 18-member committee met Tuesday for what Cargill described as a “great meeting,” in which attendees received a presentation by the state demographer. Cargill noted that according to the demographer, 86 percent of the state’s population lives along the I-35 corridor or east of it. After brainstorming ideas for main topics on which to focus, the committee is now working to narrow its list down to four items.

Before the board adjourned, member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) thanked Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff for creating a Spanish language support group in response to the myriad issues facing bilingual speakers in the public school system.

ATPE shares input on draft Texas state ESSA plan

Earlier today, ATPE submitted the following formal input to the Texas Education Agency (TEA) on its draft state plan for compliance with the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The agency is accepting input from stakeholders until Aug. 29, 2017.

 

ATPE_logoATPE Input on the
Texas ESSA Draft Plan
August 24, 2017

 

The Association of Texas Professional Educators (ATPE) appreciates this opportunity to offer the following input on the draft Texas plan to implement new federal requirements under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

ATPE remained actively engaged at the federal level as Congress worked to reauthorize ESEA and the U.S. Department of Education (ED) worked to develop, alter, and, in some cases, omit associated rules and regulations. Over the course of a series of comments submitted to both Congress and ED, ATPE weighed in on various aspects of the law, including strengthening the teaching pipeline, avoiding overly simplistic and stigmatizing summative school ratings, promoting innovative assessment strategies, ceasing the overreliance on standardized testing, and addressing the role of the federal government in K– 12 accountability and testing. While the final rewrite of the law is not perfect, ATPE is pleased that ESSA omitted outdated and onerous policies required by the previous version of the law (as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act), ended the failed policies forced through waivers under the previous administration, and restored more control at the state and local level while maintaining many necessary protections at the federal level.

Accountability and Assessments

ATPE acknowledges that the 85th Texas Legislature, as well as previous legislatures, implemented state laws pertaining to accountability and assessments that constrain portions of the Texas Education Agency’s (TEA) draft plan to satisfy federal requirements under ESSA. We hope that future legislatures will be more thoughtful in providing innovative approaches to accountability and assessments at the state level, giving TEA more latitude to take advantage of changes at the federal level. In the meantime, ATPE encourages TEA to take advantage of all opportunities to make meaningful change through funding provided at the federal level.

One promising new opportunity is the innovative assessment pilot available to states and districts. We encourage TEA to consider opportunities for pursuing this funding and to support any districts that show promise and interest in making a lasting impact on the manner in which student performance is assessed in this state. The current system of over-testing that has sparked nationwide backlash in recent years originated in Texas; our state has the opportunity once again to impact the way we assess student progress in schools throughout the country—this time in a more positive and formative way.

State Long-term Goals

ATPE appreciates the move under ESSA to eliminate Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), instead allowing states to establish their own ambitious, long-term goals. We also agree with TEA’s decision to align goals under ESSA with rigorous goals already set by the state; in this case, aligning them with the state’s 60X30 plan to have 60 percent of high school graduates completing some form of post-secondary credential by 2030. Setting the state’s long-term goals under ESSA at 90 percent of all students and all student subgroups at the “Approaches Grade Level” performance target by 2032 is a reasonable approach, and holding all students to the same standard and high aspirational goal focuses on ensuring that all students get the same access to a great public education.

However, while the plan sets the same high standards for all students and all student subgroup populations, it falls short of identifying specific strategies for educators working with certain subgroups most in need of support. For example, the chart in Appendix A shows that students in special education programs are currently meeting the Approaching Grade Level target at rates of 35 percent in reading and 42 percent in math. English Language Learner students are currently at 51 percent in reading. Both subgroups face a significantly larger gap to overcome than other subgroups on which the state collects data. Long-term, ambitious goals are important, but they must be accompanied with targeted strategies for meeting those goals, especially when current data shows that achieving those goals will be significantly more difficult for certain student populations.

School Quality Indicator

ATPE appreciates that the school quality indicator for high school students uses something other than state standardized assessments to measure school quality. However, the indicators are still heavily focused on testing, and non-high schools are still measured based on standardized testing in math and reading. ESSA specifically outlines the option for states to utilize something other than assessments, among them identifying school climate as an option. ATPE has long advocated for the addition of a school climate study in Texas or a measure of school climate as an indicator in our accountability system. This is a great opportunity for Texas to gain a better understanding of how school climate looks across the state, which affects student learning. We encourage TEA to consider the inclusion of school climate as a measure of school quality under the final ESSA school quality indicator.

Educator Training and Support

ATPE has made educator training and preparation a primary focus of our advocacy efforts. We recognize that Texas does a disservice to educators by placing ill-prepared educators in the 21st century classroom and expecting them to achieve excellence. We appreciate that recent efforts by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) and TEA have resulted in some positive outcomes to raise standards for educator preparation programs and certification requirements, and that the agency identifies educator preparation as an ongoing focus under the state ESSA plan.

As noted in the draft state plan, educator training and ongoing support play a vital role in ensuring every student has access to a well-prepared, productive educator. As the state moves forward on this front, ATPE will continue to advocate for efforts to raise standards in a fair, meaningful, and reliable way, and we encourage TEA to do the same as it remains focused on related ongoing efforts identified under the ESSA plan.

Additional Input

A piece of ESSA that is not addressed by the ED template for submitting a state plan involves federal requirements for state and local report cards. A positive outcome of ESSA was the requirement to calculate and report publically per-pupil spending and educator qualifications. The new law requires that TEA develop ways to calculate federal, state, and local per-pupil expenditures, including a means for districts to calculate individual school-level per-pupil expenditures. State and local report cards must also include the number and percentages of inexperienced educators, teachers teaching with emergency and provisional credentials, and out-of-field teachers. ATPE is interested in how this piece will be implemented and asks that TEA seek the input of stakeholders as they work to determine this federal requirement.

TEA launches Equity Toolkit for school districts

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced a new set of online resources this week aimed to assist districts in submitting Equity Plans as required by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The federal law passed in 2015 requires schools receiving Title I funding to determine whether low-income students and students of color are served at disproportionate rates by “ineffective, inexperienced, or out-of-field teachers,” and to address any inequities.

The agency is accepting submissions for Texas Equity Plans from September 1 through November 1. The deadline is designed to encourage districts to develop their plans as part of their annual improvement planning process. To make things easier, TEA has launched the Texas Equity Toolkit. The website provides templates for reporting and project management planning, as well as equity plan submission guidelines.

According to TEA, the process “is about improving student learning for every single student throughout the state.  Are all students within an LEA learning at commensurate and appropriate rates?  If not, what factors contribute to that, and what strategies can LEAs pursue or continue to pursue to help close those gaps?”

The process begins with engaging stakeholders, then reviewing and analyzing data on equity gaps. Next, districts will conduct a root cause analysis, select strategies to improve equitable access, and craft a plan for implementation. The Texas Equity Toolkit provides details and resources for each of these steps, as well as training materials.

It’s important to note that Districts of Innovation (DOI) are not exempt from the federal requirement. The agency also advises that all regional Education Service Centers (ESCs) have staff available to assist districts with their plans. A list of “Equity Leads” can be found here.

TEA seeks input on Early Childhood certification issue

Early Childhood EducationThe Texas Education Agency (TEA) is seeking input from stakeholders on the potential addition of a new Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 3 Educator Certificate, which would be offered in addition to the Early Childhood-Grade 6 Core Subjects Certificate currently administered by the agency. TEA has begun discussions with the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) regarding adding such a certificate and would like to utilize feedback from the survey when addressing SBEC about the idea at its March meeting.

Your input as an educator working within the Texas public school system will be valuable to TEA and SBEC as they consider moving forward on this possible new certificate. The survey is open until Friday, February 24 and can be found here.

Background and Context

Supporters of adding a more narrow certificate field for early childhood educators believe it would help teachers assigned to those early grades focus on the needs of their students. More specified certification and training gives teachers in the classroom a more specific skill set, knowledge, and understanding of the grades they go on to teach. Educators know that the way one teaches and the content one teaches vary significantly between grade levels. Certainly, early education looks much different than education in upper-level primary grades and at the secondary level.

A more specified certification is not a new concept to Texas. Many Texas educators will remember a time when teachers could get either an Early Childhood-Grade 4 Certification or a Grades 4-8 Certification. The vast majority of teachers sought and received an Early Childhood-Grade 4 Certification, leaving few available to fill the remaining primary school classrooms in grades 5 and 6. The unfortunate reality under this scenario was that many teachers were asked to teach outside of their certification area without corresponding training and additional support. Recognizing this wasn’t a good scenario for the teacher or the students in those classrooms, the state moved to the more general Early Childhood-Grade 6 Core Subjects Certification that is now available.

TEA has stated that it is not proposing to do away with the Early Childhood-Grade 6 Core Subjects Certification. The new Pre-K to Grade 3 Educator Certificate would be offered simply as an alternative to the current general certificate that covers more grades. However, some worry that if more certification candidates choose to pursue early childhood certification instead of the EC-6 certificate, then the supply of those teachers will outpace the demand in terms of job openings, and teaching assignments in grades 4 through 6 will become harder for districts to staff. This could lead to another waiver situation as was experienced a decade ago when teachers certified in grades K-4 were forced to teach grades 5 or 6 in order to keep their jobs.

ATPE encourages educators to share their feedback on this idea with TEA before the survey closes on Feb. 24.

TEA releases results of ESSA public survey

tea-logo-header-2The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released the results of a survey the agency conducted to collect public input on the state’s plan to implement the Every Child Succeeds Act (ESSA). Recognizing that the new law returns some decisionmaking to states when it comes to federal education policy, Commissioner Morath and TEA turned to parents, educators, taxpayers, and other public education stakeholders in Texas to gather required input on a handful of issues the state will have the opportunity to address.

The survey gathered information on five main topics, including how Texas should measure school quality or school success, support the educational success of students with varying backgrounds, increase student access to effective educators, prepare students for college and career, and support struggling schools. For each question, respondents were offered multiple options and asked to rank their top three choices.

  • In order to measure school quality or success, respondents chose career and technical training, student engagement, and school climate and safety as the top three gauges.
  • The top strategy chosen by respondents to equalize and grow access to high-quality teachers and principals was increasing teachers’ salaries. Ensuring school leaders have the flexibility to staff their schools based on the specific needs of their students and communities, and ensuring that teacher preparation programs focus on the skills and practices most linked to student achievement followed.
  • To ensure a quality education for all students, focusing resources on learning in early grade levels, providing high-quality teacher training and supports, and highlighting best practices that have increased student outcomes rose to the top of the list.
  • To improve struggling schools, respondents felt the following were the best approaches: provide more funding and resources for curricular materials, such as technology; offer incentives for excellent teachers to teach in those schools; and provide more funding and resources for wrap-around services like health care services, behavioral health services, or parent education offerings.
  • Critical thinking and development of interpersonal skills were respondents’ choices for the knowledge and skills students need in order to be prepared for college and career.

About 22,500 stakeholders completed the survey with an additional almost 7,000 beginning it but not completing. Of the 29,500 respondents, just under 12,500 identified themselves as public school teachers. Parents or guardians of public schoolchildren made up the second highest percentage of respondents, with just over 10,000 of them providing input. More than 3,500 administrators responded and a little over 1,000 students offered their perspectives. Results came in from regions all over the state, but the prairies and lakes, gulf coast, and south Texas plains regions provided the highest percentage of respondents.

The full results of the survey published by TEA can be found here and the Agency’s press release on the survey results is here.

TEA wants your input on ESSA, comments due Friday!

tea-logo-header-2This is the final week for educators, parents, and taxpayers to submit their thoughts on best practices for implementing the new federal education law in Texas. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) and Commissioner of Education Mike Morath launched a survey tool last month, asking the public to share input on how the state should implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The survey is scheduled to close this Friday at 5 pm and can be accessed here.

In a press release announcing the survey, Commissioner Morath noted that the new federal education law, which replaces the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), returns a good portion of control back to states when it comes to the role previously played by the federal government in public education. As Texas begins to look at how its public schools will operate in light of the shift, input is specifically sought around “accountability, funding, school improvement, and grant-making systems.”

U.S. Dept of Education LogoThe new federal law requires that educators and other education stakeholders be involved in developing the plan that will ultimately be submitted to the U.S. Department of Education (ED) for review, but this may be the only chance for many to provide input. As educators and parents, your hands-on input is valuable; make your voice heard today!

The survey asks respondents to give input on a series of issues that the Texas Education Agency (TEA) will weigh as they determine how to navigate new stipulations and flexibility under the law. Among the input sought, stakeholders are asked to share thoughts on how Texas should measure school quality or school success, support the educational success of students with varying backgrounds, increase student access to effective educators, prepare students for college and career, and support struggling schools. The survey also allows respondents to submit any additional input on the state’s ESSA plan that is outside of the information sought.

TEA intends to consider data from the survey as the state develops its ESSA plan. The state must submit a final plan to the federal government by July 2017.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Nov. 4, 2016

It’s the last week in review before Tuesday’s monumental election. Read more of this week’s education news:

 


MontyVote_WEBFinally, the long-awaited general election is less than four days away on Tuesday, Nov. 8. It goes without saying that this Election Day is an important one, but we’ll take a moment to again remind you of how much is at stake for public education and encourage you to get out and vote if you haven’t already. Earlier today on our blog, ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter weighed in on the importance of “exercising” the right to vote as often as possible.

Today, Nov. 4, marks the last day for early voting in Texas. Most early voting polls will close at 7 p.m. tonight. It’s also the last chance for ATPE members to get in on our “I voted” selfie photo contest. Visit the ATPE Facebook page for details on our early voting contest in which three randomly selected winners will receive a Target gift card for sharing their early voting selfie.

Additional resources for those who’ve not yet voted:

  • Through the Texas Secretary of State’s Am I Registered website, you can obtain a customized list of polling places and verify your voter registration. Also check out VoteTexas.gov for additional information on voting.
  • Vote411.org is a national website hosted by the League of Women Voters that provides sample ballots, candidate information, and more.
  • Here on Teach the Vote, learn more about your candidates for the Texas legislature and State Board of Education on our 2016 Races page. Candidate profiles include survey responses, endorsement information, and incumbents’ voting records.
  • If you have a government-issued photo ID, be sure to take it with you to the polls! Those who do not have an identification card have other options thanks to recent court decisions. Learn more here.
  • Compare the Presidential candidates’ views on education issues in this feature from the national publication Education Week.
  • Read about Texas candidates who’ve earned the endorsement of the pro-public education advocacy group Texas Parent PAC here.
  • Still looking for ways to address the election in your classroom? Read these tips from ATPE member Kim Grosenbacher. Also, check out ATPE State Past President Cory Colby’s insights in this article from The Texas Tribune.
  • Read the latest voting update from the Texas Educators Vote coalition on efforts to create a culture of voting in Texas public schools this year, and check out the many other resources from the coalition on their website here. We especially like seeing the election countdown!

 


Congressman Kevin Brady (R-Texas) held a conference call yesterday to update educators on his efforts to address the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP), a federal Social Security offset that reduces the amount of retirement benefits that many educators and other public employees may receive. In his own words, Congressman Brady told educators on the call that he’s “been working on this issue for decades” because he believes it is unfair that public servants do not receive “equal treatment” and are penalized by the WEP. Brady filed H.R. 711, known as the Equal Treatment of Public Servants Act (ETPSA), to replace the WEP with a more equitable formula for calculating Social Security benefits.

committee-sealIn July, the U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means, which Congressman Brady chairs, was set to vote on H.R. 711, but the vote was delayed after a few national employee groups opposed and tried to amend the bill. Since that time, the congressman and his staff have continued to meet with stakeholders to address their concerns and have requested additional actuarial data from the Social Security Administration. Brady shared with educators participating in yesterday’s call his commitment to keep working to pass the ETPSA this year and refile the bill in the next Congress in 2017 if necessary.

Of particular importance to the chairman is passing a reform measure that will help both current and future retirees. “Many have given up hope that it can be solved, but I’m not one of them,” Brady emphasized. “We’re so close in my opinion, but we’ve still got some serious work to do going forward,” said the chairman to educators and other stakeholders on the conference call on Nov. 3.

Educators affected by the WEP are encouraged to share their own stories and examples of how the unfair law is hurting them. Chairman Brady urged educators to keep sending their stories via email to WEP.feedback@mail.house.gov so that he and other backers of the ETPSA can “make the case to the broader Congress” about the urgent need for WEP reform.

ATPE has joined with a coalition of employee and retiree associations from across the country, including the Texas Retired Teachers Association, working alongside Chairman Brady to increase educators’ Social Security benefits and neutralize the negative consequences of the WEP. The congressman told yesterday’s conference call participants, “It’s absolutely critical that we have a strong, unified coalition” in order to achieve successful legislation to reform the WEP.

ATPE state officers and staff members met with Chairman Brady last month in Washington to discuss the ETPSA.

ATPE state officers and staff members met with Chairman Brady in Washington to discuss the ETPSA.

Among those representing educators on the call was ATPE’s federal lobbyist David Pore, who thanked Chairman Brady for his tireless efforts on behalf of our members and others affected by the WEP. Brady similarly thanked ATPE, TRTA, and others for “staying at the table” as negotiations have continued on the legislation. We at ATPE are very thankful for Chairman Brady’s perseverance and the hard work of his staff. Keep sending in your WEP input, and stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates on this very important legislation.

 


Several press releases came out of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) this week. TEA responded to allegations that it has forced districts to meet an arbitrary cap on enrolling students in special education programs. The agency also released several announcements pertaining to school accountability and interventions. Read full details in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

 


Kuhlmann SBEC testimony Aug 2016The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) recently revised its rules pertaining to educator preparation and certification in Texas. As ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann reported earlier this week, the rule changes affect preparation, program requirements, pathways to certification, and more. The rules also seek to raise the quality of training all teachers receive before going into the classroom, something that ATPE regularly fights for on behalf of all Texas educators. ATPE recognizes that teachers deserve strong training prior to entering the classroom, because the expectations are high and the work isn’t easy once they’re in it full time. Read Kate’s full story to learn more about ATPE’s position and the changes made to the rules, including changes in rules governing the educational aide certificate.

 


Go vote today or on Tuesday! Every vote matters!

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