Category Archives: SBEC

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: May 18, 2018

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Today is the last day to vote early in the primary runoff elections taking place on Tuesday, May 22. Following historical trends, early voting returns have so far been less than stellar.

The May runoff election seems designed to create low turnout. It follows the May uniform election date by only about two weeks. It’s right at the edge of summer when many people, certainly educators and parents, are already distracted and some school districts will have already ended their school year. Also, the types and quantities of the races are much more scattershot, and the rules have many voters confused about whether or not they are even eligible to vote (Hint: if you didn’t vote at all in the primary back in March, you are still eligible to vote in the runoff, as long as you were registered to vote before the deadline.)

All of the reasons above drive down turnout, which is why ATPE and a coalition of education partners are working to instill a culture of voting in the education community. A culture of voting cuts through individual races and impediments and instills a mentality that educators will vote in every election – no matter what. Unfortunately, changing culture is a slow business, and despite the fever of rhetoric about voting that has become a mainstay since 2016, the majority of educators haven’t yet taken the message to heart. However, each election the momentum of the education vote continues to build. Perhaps this, the lowest turnout of all elections, will be the one where you and your group of colleagues will join the movement.

ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins breaks down why a vote in the Texas primaries is one of the most powerful tools an educator has in this blog post. Be sure to check out our candidate profiles before you cast your vote this evening or on Tuesday.

 


TEA needs you! The Texas Education Agency (TEA) needs “new” teachers to complete a survey to help improve educator preparation. A completed survey is worth 10 Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann reports about the TEA survey in her blog post earlier this week, but here are some additional quick details:

What is the survey about and how will responses be used?
The survey is designed to determine how well Educator Preparation Programs (EPPs) are preparing teachers to enter the classroom. The results will be used to help improve EPPs and the educational experience of teacher certification candidates who attend those programs.

Who is eligible to take the survey?
TEA has invited “new” teachers, which in this case refers to teachers teaching in their first year under a standard certificate, to participate in the survey.

When is the survey open?
You should have received an email with a link to the online survey on or before April 18, 2018. You have until June 15, 2018 to complete the survey. If you believe you are eligible to take the survey but did not receive an email with a survey link, please contact TEA at pilotteachersurvey@tea.texas.gov.

How do I get started?
Once you receive the email, simply click on the link and take the survey. You can complete the survey in one session or multiple sessions.

Do I receive a benefit for taking the survey?
Once you submit your completed survey, you can download a certificate worth 10 CPE credits.

 



The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is meeting today in Austin. Its discussion includes creating an accelerated pathway for certain teachers to enter the classroom without satisfying traditional training requirements. It’s the result of House Bill (HB) 3349, a bill by Representative Barbara Gervin-Hawkins, passed by the 85th Legislature last year that requires SBEC to implement the new abbreviated training program for candidates seeking the Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificate.

The board spent significant time this morning discussing a new rulemaking proposal responsive to the bill. The proposal on today’s agenda, which board members saw today for the first time, was vastly different from an initial proposal discussed at previous meetings. ATPE and other educator groups opposed the new plan and were not part of the unidentified group of “stakeholders” that singularly drove the new proposal. In laying out our opposition to the proposal which we view as weakening teacher training standards, ATPE stressed the board’s recent efforts to raise standards for teacher training in Texas.

Read more in this SBEC wrap-up from  ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann, who attended and testified at the meeting today.

 


In Washington, DC, educators and military groups have united to defeat a federal voucher proposal for students from military families. ATPE and other groups believe the measure would drain dollars currently sent to public schools that aid those students.

The U.S. House is preparing its annual reauthorization of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Included in the act is the Impact Aid program, which helps fund schools that lose local revenue because their districts contain federal lands, including military bases, which do not pay local school property taxes. An amendment filed by Rep. Jim Banks (R-Ind.) this week would create an Education Savings Account (ESA) voucher for certain military families and would pay for the voucher by defunding the Impact Aid Program.

Banks is facing stiff opposition even from some members of his own party. Stripping the Impact Aid Program would significantly impact the very schools that serve a vast majority of children of active duty military personnel.

ATPE’s Washington-based lobbyists have been working to oppose the addition of the Banks voucher amendment. This week, ATPE sent a letter of opposition to Congressman Pete Sessions (R-Texas) who chairs the powerful House Rules committee, and others. For an amendment like the Banks voucher amendment to be considered on the House Floor, it must first be deemed eligible by Chairman Sessions’s committee. The rules committee will meet early next week to determine which proposed amendments to the NDAA will be in order. ATPE members can click here  to reach out to their members of congress on this issue. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for additional updates next week.

 


 

SBEC gives initial approval to weakened abbreviated educator preparation program

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is meeting today in Austin. The board spent significant time this morning on a proposal to create an abbreviated path to the Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificate. As the board received word of the heartbreaking news regarding a school shooting developing in Santa Fe ISD, members held a moment of silence and broke for a fifteen minute recess.

The abbreviated educator preparation and training program for candidates seeking the Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificate was codified into law by HB 3349, a bill by Representative Gervin-Hawkins, during the 85th Legislature last year. The law requires SBEC to implement the new abbreviated pathway. The board has seen and discussed the proposal for its past two meetings, but the proposal the board saw today was a vastly different version based on input from the bill’s author and others out of the San Antonio area. ATPE and other educator groups were not a part of that stakeholder group that singularly drove the changes. Today, ATPE joined a chorus of stakeholders from the education community in opposing the changes.

Stressing the board’s recent focus on raising standards for teacher training in Texas, ATPE highlighted three major changes under the new proposal that are of concern:

  1. It expands the abbreviated program path to the Marketing and Health Science certificates. These are not included in the bill and were not discussed by legislators as desired abbreviated pathways.
  2. It reduces the number of training hours required before the candidate enters the classroom as the teacher-or-record from 180 to 110. While trade and industrial workforce career individuals bring valuable subject matter expertise to the classroom, they lack the training required to ensure they understand the science behind teaching that subject matter to a child. ATPE sees no reason these candidates should receive less pre-service training than other teacher candidates.
  3. It allows entities other than approved EPPs to provide the remaining 90 hours of training, which is again outside the bounds of the bill and, further, calls into question who is responsible for, approved for, and accountable to training educators.

Rep. Gervin-Hawkins was the only attendee present at the board meeting expressing support for the new trade and industrial workforce training proposal. All four teacher organizations and testimony from a classroom teacher shared the concerns expressed above by ATPE. Teacher board member Suzanne McCall was the only board member to oppose the new proposal. She highlighted testimony from the fourth grade Texas teacher who sees too many of her fellow teachers enter the classroom ill-prepared and watches them struggle. McCall stressed the importance of the foundational knowledge teachers receive before entering the classroom, and reminded the board that teacher pre-service training entails important exposure to things like how to teacher students with special needs. Her attempts to improve the proposal through amendments failed to receive any support from her fellow board members.

Many of the remaining board members seemed poised from the beginning to support the new proposal. Several members seemed unconcerned that these teacher candidates would receive less training than other teachers prior to entering the classroom as the sole teacher responsible for the students of a classroom. Superintendent member Dr. Susan Hull said these candidates don’t need more than 110 hours of training, which equates to roughly 3 weeks. Citizen member Leon Leal said we are disrespecting the career knowledge these candidates bring by expecting them to have the same amount of pre-service training as other teachers. There was interest from superintendent member Dr. Cavazos in removing the addition of the Marketing and Health Science certificates, but he ultimately only expressed concern and chose not to offer an amendment to remove them. Other members of the board advocated for the added certificates. The board’s action today granted only initial approval to the proposal.

The board also gave initial approval to proposals pertaining to the Educators’ Code of Ethics and educator discipline. At the board’s previous meeting in March, ATPE engaged with the board over a proposal to amend the Educators’ Code of Ethics. Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff at that time was looking to add several items that ATPE, other stakeholders, and board members felt didn’t belong because they weaken the Educators’ Code of Ethics and the high regard to which it should be held. Board members asked TEA to come back to them with more appropriate revisions. ATPE and other stakeholders worked with the staff to revise the text and was ultimately successful at moving a key piece of concern to the disciplinary chapter, where it is more appropriately housed.

The board will be back to consider the above items for final adoption at the August 3 meeting.

TEA encourages education stakeholders to share rulemaking input

In a letter addressed to school administrators Tuesday, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) requested that school districts and open-enrollment charter schools include upcoming rulemaking actions on their websites in order to encourage school leaders, parents, and teachers to participate in the rulemaking process. The agency is asking districts and charters to post links to the TEA’s web pages that host proposed rules of the Commissioner of Education, the State Board of Education (SBOE), and the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC).

Along with legislative action at the Texas Capitol, administrative rulemaking is one of the two main ways education policy is made. However, unlike the Texas Legislature, which is only active for 140 days every two years, state administrative bodies make rules year-round. When it comes to public education, the Commissioner of Education, the SBOE, and SBEC each have express rulemaking authority over a defined set of topics. While very different from the legislative process, the rulemaking process also makes use of public input. To increase public accessibility, the TEA has implemented new electronic forms to provide public comment on proposed rules, which can be found by clicking on the corresponding links above. The agency has also created a frequently-asked questions (FAQ) page about the rulemaking process.

ATPE’s lobby team regularly participates in the rulemaking proceses by giving written and oral input to the commissioner and state boards on issues of concern to our membership. Also, we frequently post about significant rulemaking actions here on our blog at TeachTheVote.org, and we encourage you similarly to follow rulemaking developments that affect you, your colleagues, your students, and your classrooms. Submitting feedback on these rulemaking actions is a great way to continue to have your teacher voice heard on important education policy matters throughout the year!

SBOE committee update: Dyslexia, CPE changes

The State Board of Education (SBOE) met in committees Thursday morning. Members of the Committee on Instruction considered a number of items related to students with dyslexia. The first involves amending current administrative rules to strengthen the evaluation procedure used in determining whether a student has dyslexia, as well as providing more information to parents regarding the process and evaluator credentials.

Texas SBOE Committee on Instruction meeting April 12, 2018.

Additionally, members of the committee heard testimony regarding potential changes to the Dyslexia Handbook. Revisions are being considered in order to implement provisions of House Bill (HB) 1886, which aimed to improve early identification and support for students with dyslexia and related disorders. Much of the public testimony regarded the value of highly trained educators and therapists as well as well-crafted programs, and noted the reason for shortages in these areas often revolves around insufficient funding.

Parents noted that many rural schools are understaffed, and dyslexia teachers may pay for training themselves. One witness, a Section 504 Coordinator from Frisco ISD, suggested the handbook not forget the importance of identifying older students who may have missed being identified as dyslexic, often as a result of high-level performance or transferring from out-of-state schools. Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff indicated work is being done with stakeholder committees to prepare revisions in time for the board to vote at their September meeting. Changes would be effective beginning with the 2018-2019 school year.

The Committee on School Initiatives meanwhile turned its attention to educator certification and continuing professional education (CPE). The committee advanced a rule change passed by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) that would require educator preparation programs to do a better job of informing candidates who may be ineligible to gain certification for a variety of reasons.

Members also advanced a SBEC rule change resulting from Senate Bill (SB) 7, SB 1839, and SB 179, which added CPE requirements regarding inappropriate teacher-student relationships, digital literacy, and grief and trauma training, respectively. While the original rule required educators to regularly select from a list of CPE topics not to exceed 25 percent in any one particular subject, the new rule will require educators to allocate their CPE hours so that every subject is covered.

The committee is scheduled to meet Thursday afternoon to discuss public feedback on the Long-Range Plan for Public Education, and several SBOE members are expected to attend in addition to those already on the committee. Check back with TeachTheVote.org for updates from this meeting.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: March 2, 2018

Happy Texas Independence Day! It’s also the last day of early voting in the Texas primaries. Read the latest election news and more in this week’s wrap-up from ATPE:


ELECTION UPDATE: Today is the last day for early voting in the 2018 Texas primary elections. Election day is Tuesday, March 6. Early voting is the most convenient way to cast your ballot, since you can visit any polling place in your county. On Tuesday, you’ll need to vote in your precinct’s assigned polling location unless your county is participating in the Countywide Polling Place Program.

As a starting point, check out these tips on voting from ATPE Political Involvement Coordinator Edwin Ortiz. You’ll find answers to common questions such as what forms of ID are required and whether you can bring notes into the voting booth with you.

Learn about the nonbinding propositions that will appear at the end of your primary ballot as a way for the state Republican and Democratic parties to develop their official platform positions on certain issues. ATPE Lobbyist Monty Exter has the scoop on those propositions here.

Most importantly, if you’ve not voted yet, it’s not too late to explore our candidate profiles here on Teach the Vote. The profiles include detailed voting records for incumbents, which are based on official records maintained in the House and Senate journals. Learn more about ATPE’s process for compiling and verifying voting records here. The candidates’ profiles also include their responses to our ATPE candidate survey, where available, links to the candidates’ websites and social media profiles, and more. We even share information about upcoming campaign-related events when requested by the candidates.

Remember that many candidates are looking for volunteers this weekend and especially for election day on Tuesday. Learn more about volunteering to help out a pro-public education campaign in this blog post from ATPE Governmental Relations Director Jennifer Mitchell Canaday.

If you are voting in the Republican primary, don’t forget about precinct conventions that will be happening Tuesday evening after the polls close. It’s a chance to become a delegate to the party’s conventions and help further shape the party’s platform on education and other issues. On the Democratic side, there are no precinct conventions but you can sign up to participate in the party’s county-level conventions in April. Learn more in this blog post we republished last month from the Texas Tribune.

For additional election resources for educators, check out the website for our Texas Educators Vote coalition. Kudos to everyone who has helped us create a culture of voting throughout the education community, despite a barrage of attacks from those who feel threatened by the prospect of more educators being actively engaged in the election process and voting for candidates who will stand up for public education.

If you’ve not voted yet, get out there today or make plans to vote on Tuesday! Remind your friends, too!

 


Over the past week, we’ve featured a series of blog posts for Teach the Vote on Why March 6 Matters. We’ve been highlighting just a few of the specific reasons why educators’ votes in this primary election are going to shape the outcome of numerous debates when the Texas legislature meets again in 2019. If you’re still wondering what’s at stake on Tuesday, check out these posts by ATPE’s lobbyists on some of the hottest topics that the people you elect this year will be tackling during the next legislative session in 2019:

 


ATPE’s Kate Kuhlmann testifying at a recent SBEC meeting

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today in Austin. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann testified at the meeting and provided a report on the outcome of the board’s discussions. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for more developments from SBEC in 2018.

 

 


Carl Garner

ATPE is asking Congress to protect teacher training and retention programs as it works on reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (HEA). ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann provided an update on our blog this week about our efforts to ensure that Congress doesn’t strip out Title II program dealing with educator recruitment, training, and retention. Read more about our effort being coordinated by ATPE’s Washington-based lobby team and the letter sent earlier this week to Texas’s congressional delegation from ATPE State President Carl Garner.

 


 

Recap of today’s SBEC meeting

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met today for its first meeting of 2018. ATPE engaged the board on several agenda items.

Among the items requiring action at today’s meeting, ATPE expressed support for the adoption of changes to the board’s continuing professional education (CPE) rules. Those changes originated from laws passed during the 85th Legislative Session that dealt with CPE for understanding appropriate relationships with students, digital learning, and educating students affected by grief and trauma. ATPE shared with the board that it worked actively with the legislators who wrote and passed SB7 (the educator misconduct bill that stemmed from media reports focused on an issue termed “passing the trash”) to encourage the inclusion of preventative measures in addition to appropriate sanctioning. While ATPE knows that educators engaging in this misconduct make up an extremely small percentage of the overall educator population, we recognize that one incident is too many. We support the SBEC’s and the legislature’s efforts to address these issues, not only with sanctioning on the back end, but also through ensuring educators receive ongoing education in an effort to prevent this from happening in the first place.

Other items adopted by the board today included new language involving educator preparation admission requirements, testing security and confidentiality for certification assessments, and standards specific to the new Early Childhood through Grade 3 Certificate. The board also reelected Haskell teacher Jill Druesedow as chair, made Harlingen Superintendent Dr. Art Cavazos the vice-chair, and voted to make citizen member Leon Leal the secretary. The remaining items on the agenda were dedicated to discussion only.

One of today’s discussion items dealt with several proposed Educator Code of Ethics (COE) revisions requested by Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff. Several members of the board and other educator stakeholders joined ATPE in expressing concerns over pieces of the item, particularly the broad nature of one piece regarding written directives from administrators. SBEC directed staff to continue working on the language proposed at today’s meeting, and TEA staff expressed intention to hold a stakeholder meeting before the next SBEC meeting. ATPE will continue to work collaboratively with TEA and SBEC to find a more appropriate approach.

Finally, ATPE weighed in on a discussion item that dealt with educator preparation program (EPP) requirements. We offered support for a piece that defines long-term substitute experience as a 30 consecutive day assignment, encouraged the board to increase the minimum number of hours required for an abbreviated Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificate program, and supported the addition of an EPP curriculum requirement specific to training on appropriate boundaries, relationships, and communications between educators and students. To learn more about the long-term substitute experience definition and how it plays into educator preparation, read our post covering the last meeting where ATPE member Stephanie Stoebe called for raised standards.

SBOE reviews SBEC rules regarding misconduct reporting

The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) returned to the headquarters of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) Thursday morning for committee meetings. The Committee on School initiatives considered a number of items handed up from the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC), which the SBOE is empowered to approve or reject.

SBOE Committee on School Initiatives meeting February 1, 2018.

The committee gave the green light to new pedagogical and professional responsibilities standards, as well as standards for the new prekindergarten through grade three certificate. Members also gave the nod to changes regarding the certification of educators from other countries.

The committee also reviewed new SBEC rules implementing Senate Bill (SB) 7. Under the legislation passed by the 85th Texas Legislature, principals have to report to superintendents when they become aware of a potentially inappropriate relationship between an educator and a student. The law also gives SBEC the authority to issue fines against principals and superintendents who fail to report as required, which SBEC has set at $500 and $5,000, respectively. Additionally, the law grants authority for SBEC to sanction or deny certification for someone who has been involved in an inappropriate relationship with a student or aided in obtaining employment for someone they know to have had an inappropriate relationship.

The School Initiatives committee concluded its meeting with an update on the Long-Range Plan for Public Education, which has been the subject of several community meetings across the state. Six meetings have already been held, and four more are currently scheduled to allow local educators and stakeholders to provide input on issues important to the future of public education in Texas. The TEA has launched an online survey (which can be found here) to solicit additional feedback, and to date have had more than 1,100 responses. A steering committee is expected to release preliminary recommendations at an April 9 meeting.

The full board will return Friday.

SBOE and SBEC gather to focus on educator supports

The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) and State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) came together under one roof for the first time Wednesday to participate in a learning roundtable on recruiting, preparing and retaining top teachers hosted by the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA).

Members of the SBOE and SBEC pose together at the TASA Midwinter Conference on January 31, 2018.

One of the first panels focused on “grow your own” models for teacher recruitment, and featured representatives from Teach Denton and the STEP UP program in Harlingen. These local programs focus on internships and outreach at the high school level to track future educators into a career in education. Opportunities such as student teaching experiences may serve to attract and prepare students who will thrive in a teaching career.

Keynote speakers included Doug Lemov, author of Teach Like a Champion, and author and speaker Peter M. DeWitt. DeWitt presented six influences that lead to improved student outcomes: Collective teacher efficacy, assessment capable learners, feedback, professional development, family engagement and instructional leadership. Lemoy walked educators through several videos illustrating classroom engagement, and encouraged educators to consider the ratio of who’s doing the mental work in a classroom: The teacher or the students. Highly performing classrooms feature students who are actively engaged in classroom discussions.

According to Lemoy, watching “game films” of teachers in the classroom can help educators evaluate that ratio. One observation obtained through this practice suggests that asking students to write before answering questions orally improves participation. Another suggests that giving students more time to consider a question before asking for an answer enables more students to contribute. Lemoy stressed the importance of creating a positive classroom culture, in particular one that gives students the confidence to make mistakes in order to learn from them.

The afternoon featured a panel discussion on district preparation program partnerships, such as the partnership between Midway ISD and Baylor University. Texas Tech University Dean Scott Ridley warned that many new teachers are reaching the classroom without any previous experience teaching a classroom as part of their educator preparation training. Ridley noted more than half of new teachers are coming through the late hire alternate certification pathway. At the same time, many school districts are waiving requirements to hire certified classroom teachers. Dr. Ridley advocated for more classroom training for teacher candidates. The Teacher Education Program at Texas Tech incorporates video to record and review the classroom performance of teacher candidates.

The day concluded with panels on supporting teachers early in their career, as well as opportunities for growth and development for experienced teachers. The SBOE is scheduled to return to their regular setting at the Texas Education Agency (TEA) headquarters on Thursday, where then will take up various items before the board committees.

SBEC wraps final 2017 meeting, announces joint conference with SBOE

The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met for the final board meeting of the year to act on and discuss an agenda filled with a number of topics, including revisiting a controversial proposal to certify “non-traditional” superintendent candidates.

Bills from the 85th legislature make their way through rulemaking

The board gave final approval (all finally approved rule proposals are still subject to review by the State Board of Education) to new disciplinary rules triggered by elements of Senate Bill (SB) 7, a bill passed by the 85th Legislature that involved disciplinary sanctions for educator misconduct related to inappropriate relationships; and approved new grade-band pedagogy and professional responsibilities (PPR) standards that include PPR standards for the new legislatively required EC-3 certificate.

The board gave initial approval (all initially approved rule proposals are posted for public comment and review in the Texas Register before being considered for final approval at the following meeting) to a rule that establishes the content standards and the science of teaching reading standards for the new EC-3 certificate, as well as one that clarifies certain continuing professional education (CPE) requirements, among other CPE rule revisions related to certificate renewal.

Revisit of non-traditional superintendent certificate rejected for now

The item on Friday’s agenda that seemed to get the most attention from stakeholders was one involving a pathway to certification for certain individuals wanting to become superintendents without the required experience. At the request of one board member, the board considered and ultimately chose not to revisit a previously rejected proposal that would have created a path to becoming a superintendent without prior experience in the classroom, a school, or a managerial role.

The proposal originally surfaced in 2015 and, at the time, had two parts: (1) a pathway for candidates who have managerial experience in a school setting outside of the required teaching and principal experience, and (2) a much broader pathway that allowed anyone with a post-baccalaureate degree whom a school board deems appropriate to seek certification as long as the school board publicly posts why the selected candidate is qualified. ATPE opposed both alternative pathways. The board originally opted by a margin of one vote to approve the proposal that included both pathways, but it was later rejected by the SBOE based on the second piece of the proposal only. Eventually, only the proposal involving prior management experience in a public school system went into effect (in February 2016). Last week’s SBEC discussion on this topic was focused on revisiting the controversial piece of the proposal that never became rule.

ATPE again testified against the irresponsible and unnecessary pathway and opposed the board’s need to revisit the proposal at last Friday’s meeting. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann urged board members not to move forward with the proposal, testifying that ATPE members strongly believe that “classroom teaching experience, in addition to managerial experience and a strong educational background, is a critical contributing factor to the success of an administrator.” Kuhlmann pointed out that rejecting the attempt to weaken the superintendent certification standards would be in alignment with the board’s core principles, which acknowledge student success as primary and high standards for preparation and certification as paramount; in alignment with the superintendent standards adopted by the board that reflect learner focused values; and in alignment with what a chorus of educators in the field are communicating is needed to lead a school system. (All four teacher groups and school administrators opposed revisiting the proposal.)

The motion to reconsider the proposal ultimately failed, but the chapter covering superintendent certification will be up for scheduled review beginning in August 2018, giving board members advocating for the change another chance to push the controversial proposal.

ATPE member advocates to raise standards for educator preparation

Stephanie Stoebe, an ATPE member in Round Rock ISD, attended Friday’s SBEC meeting to testify on a proposal involving educator preparation programs and the candidates attending them. Specifically, her testimony focused on a piece of the proposal involving experience gained as a long-term substitute, something she’d previously discussed with the Texas legislature as it weighed the new provision in law earlier this year. She encouraged SBEC to increase the days constituting a long-term substitute as it relates to substituting field-based experience requirements for teacher certification candidates. The board’s original proposal defined a long-term substitute assignment as one made up of at least ten consecutive days. Stoebe recommended it be increased to 30 consecutive days, which is “about the amount of time it takes to teach one unit,” Stoebe told board members.

Board members expressed vocal agreement with regard to increasing the consecutive day requirement and asked Texas Education Agency (TEA) staff to get input and bring the proposal back with the increased standard. The proposal was only a discussion item on last week’s agenda; SBEC is expected to revisit the revised proposal for initial approval at its next meeting in March.

SBEC to host conference with SBOE in January

SBEC and SBOE will host a free, one-day conference on Thursday, January 25, from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm at the Austin Convention Center. The conference, titled Learning Roundtable: Recruiting, Preparing, and Retaining Teachers, will focus on the three title topics and include relevant panel discussions throughout the day.

Attendees are eligible to receive up to 5.5 hours of CPE credit. To learn more about the conference or to register for the event at no cost, visit the TEA web page dedicated to the event.

Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Dec. 8, 2017

It’s a snowy edition of today’s education news wrap-up from ATPE Governmental Relations:


The State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is meeting today in Austin. ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann is attending and testifying at today’s meeting, which had a delayed start on account of the overnight snowfall and concerns about road conditions in central Texas. The board today gave final approval of educator disciplinary rule changes implementing Senate Bill 7 as passed by the Texas Legislature earlier this year to address teacher misconduct. Also approved were standards tied to a new early childhood teaching certificate and a preliminary rule revision to clarify the continuing professional education requirements for teachers renewing their certificates. SBEC declined to act today on one board member’s request to consider loosening requirements for individuals to become certified as superintendents. ATPE and other educator groups testified in opposition to diluting the superintendent certification standards. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote on Monday for a more detailed summary of today’s SBEC meeting from Kuhlmann.


Voters participating in the Texas Republican Party primary in March 2018 will be asked to share their views about private school vouchers. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins has a look at 11 non-binding propositions approved by state GOP party leaders for placement on the March ballot. They include questions about property taxes and revenue caps, along with a proposed statement of support for funding vouchers for private or home schooling “without government constraints or intrusion.” Read more in the blog post here.


In case you missed it, ATPE has provided input to Texas’s congressional delegation on tax reform proposals still pending in Washington, DC this week. Read more about the proposals put forth by the U.S. House and Senate respectively and how they could impact educators in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Kate Kuhlmann.


Monday, Dec. 11, is the deadline for candidates to file for inclusion on the ballot in one of the state’s primary elections on March 6. ATPE will be updating our TeachtheVote.org website to include any newly filed candidates once the filing period closes. All candidates running for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, State House, State Senate, or State Board of Education (SBOE) are invited to participate in ATPE’s candidate survey and have their responses and additional information featured in individual candidate profiles on the website. Candidates must provide ATPE with a campaign email address in order to participate in the survey. Several candidates have already taken our survey and shared their views on public education issues with voters. We look forward to receiving additional responses as the election nears and hope you’ll check out and share our election resources on TeachtheVote.org.