Category Archives: Long-Range Plan for Public Education

SBOE Receives Public Feedback on Their Long Range Plan

After completing their regular committee work, State Board members received a report on the feedback that was received from the community engagement sessions held around the state over the course of several months in late 2017 and early 2018. A total of 680 members of the public attended one of 11 sessions. More than eleven thousand Texans responded to an online survey designed to elicit additional feedback on the same topics covered at the live sessions. The topics covered during the community conversations included student engagement and empowerment; educator preparation, recruitment, and retention; equity and access; and family engagement and empowerment.

A few of the takeaways from the survey responses; of the more the 9,300 who answered the question on funding equity, only 14.1 percent of Texans found that the level of equity in school funding in Texas was good or excellent, while 54.9 percent found that it was poor. The public ranked ensuring teacher pay equity between affluent and less affluent schools and providing “leadership and advanced career opportunities for teachers who want to remain in the classroom,” as their first and second priorities in educator preparation, recruitment and retention.

View the entire discussion on the public feedback related to the Board’s Long Range Plan here.

More information on the community / public feedback, as well as, additional information about the Long Range Plan and the Long Range Plan Steering Committee can be found here.

The next, and potentially final, Long Range Planning committee will be held on May 14. After the committee concludes it will report its recommendations to the State Board which will consider, potentially edit, and ultimately adopt some of all of the report as the State Board of Education’s Long Range Plan.

Long-Range Plan work ramping up

Members of the steering committee for the Long-Range Plan (LRP) for Public Education met Monday morning in Austin to get down to the work of preparing a report due this fall to the State Board of Education (SBOE). The work consisted of developing vision statements and recommendations for each of the four deep dive topics identified by the committee: Student engagement, family engagement and empowerment, equity of access, and teacher preparation, recruitment and retention.

Long-Range Plan steering committee meeting April 9, 2018.

The meeting began with an update from SBOE Member Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands), who recapped her testimony before the March 19 meeting of the Texas Commission on Public School Finance regarding the LRP. Cargill informed the commission that almost 700 people attended ten public meetings around the state, and nearly 11,500 people participated in an online survey regarding the LRP.

Members next discussed the purpose of the LRP, which has tentatively been described as sharing a “vision for where Texas could be in 2030 and how the state can work together to get there.” In addition, members aim to inform legislation and to inform stakeholders how to use the report. The group also discussed the primary audience for whom the report is intended, and chose to focus broadly on all education stakeholders, including teachers, administrators and elected officials.

Steering committee members discuss educator preparation, recruitment and retention.

Those participating in a focus group on educators Monday indicated several important areas in pursuit of an overall vision statement. These included a competitive teacher compensation system, elevating the teaching profession, highly qualified educator preparation programs, an effective support system for all teachers, teachers equipped for the classroom environment, and helping teacher demographics better mirror student demographics.

SBOE Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) was vocal in advocating for hiring more teachers trained by minority serving institutions (MSIs). This has been shown to correlate positively with better teacher retention rates when serving an increasingly diverse student population. Members engaged in a spirited debate about the role of less rigorous alternative certification when one of the committee’s goals is to promote education as an elite profession.

After Monday’s meeting, members will provide feedback and revisions before meeting again on May 14, when the committee will discuss, revise and finalize recommendations before submitting the report to the SBOE. Facilitators suggested an additional meeting in June may be required, depending upon how much work remains to be done. SBOE Chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston), who also chairs the 18-member steering committee, suggested submitting the report before the June SBOE meeting. This would allow the SBOE to offer the report up for public comment, then approve the report at its September meeting.

Steering committee looks at long-term goals for educator prep, retention

The steering committee for the Long-Range Plan for Public Education met this morning, Feb. 21, in Austin to address educator preparation, recruitment, and retention in Texas. The 18-member committee has been appointed by the State Board of Education (SBOE) to recommend long-term goals for Texas public schools.

Long-Range Plan for Public Education steering committee meeting, Feb. 21, 2018.

Before delving into the day’s agenda, the committee addressed a question regarding how the final report will be compiled. An earlier deep dive session on school funding recommended the state perform a study on the effectiveness of the Texas school finance system on a regular basis, and the committee expressed a desire to retain control of this particular component of the report as opposed to turning it over to an outside partner to compile.

Next came a discussion of educator preparation. Texas school districts hire 30,000 teachers a year. A total of 135 educator preparation providers offer 260 programs, including 153 traditional programs and 107 alternative certification programs. In 2014-2015, 18,626 teachers enrolled in alternative certification programs, compared to 16,425 who enrolled in traditional certification programs. The top traditional program providers are state universities, with Texas A&M University topping the list. A+ Texas Teachers was the most popular alternative certification provider, though many alt-cert teachers used web-centric alternative certification programs.

Nationally, enrollment in teacher preparation programs dropped 31 percent from 2009 to 2013. Enrollment fell 48 percent in Texas from 2009 to 2014. This happened as the number of students has steadily increased. According to a peer-reviewed journal article on Texas teacher preparation, new teachers are more likely to teach low-performing students and in high-poverty schools. Among the challenges facing teachers is a demographic mismatch between teachers and students. The majority of teachers are white, while the majority of students are Hispanic. SBOE Member Georgina Perez (D-El Paso) suggested tracking the number of teachers prepared by minority serving institutions (MSIs).

The committee also discussed the Texas Education Agency’s (TEA) “Grow Your Own” program, which is focused on recruiting high school students who show talent and interest in education to pursue a career in teaching. This includes a grant program and clinical training programs for rural teachers, as well as partnerships such as Teach Forward Houston, which pairs Houston ISD and the University of Houston to offer selected applicants up to $20,000 to pursue a teaching degree and teach in the district.

More than one of five Texas teachers leave their position each year, which is higher than the 16 percent national average. Most, 43 percent, listed “personal or life reasons” for leaving. Another 31 percent listed “change of career.” Special education teachers left at nearly double the rate. While lower-income and lower-performing schools saw higher teacher attrition, schools with larger populations of English language learners (ELLs) saw lower rates.

Some of the proposals for retaining teachers include developing career pathways that can lead to increased pay and responsibilities without leaving the classroom, inexpensive housing for teachers, and programs to subsidize tuition and help repay student loans. SBOE Member Tom Maynard (R-Florence) raised a question about the earning power of teachers today, relative to in the past, and pointed out that the cost of health insurance has increased much faster than salaries.

Members of the steering committee broke into working groups Wednesday morning to study these components in depth. The committee plans to develop a set of recommendations by April, and a draft report by May.

SBOE Long-Range Plan committee holds first meeting

Members of the State Board of Education (SBOE) hosted the first steering committee meeting Tuesday for the development of a Long-Range Plan for Public Education.

Long Range Plan Steering Committee meeting September 12, 2017 at the Texas Education Agency.

Long-Range Plan Steering Committee meeting at the Texas Education Agency, Sept. 12, 2017.

The 18-member steering committee includes SBOE chair Donna Bahorich (R-Houston) and members Barbara Cargill (R-The Woodlands), Tom Maynard (R-Florence), Georgina Perez (D-El Paso), and Marty Rowley (R-Amarillo). Three staff members from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) are also on the committee, as well as 10 public stakeholders representing various community and education interests. Additional information on the Long-Range Plan and steering committee members can be found on the TEA website.

The steering committee’s purpose is to recommend long-term goals for the state’s public school system and to identify strengths, opportunities, and challenges. The purpose of the steering committee’s first meeting was to adopt operating procedures, elect a chair, look at examples of long-range plans from other states, brainstorm a vision, get an image of the Texas demographic landscape in 2030, and prioritize three to four topics for deep dive sessions.

One of the committee’s first actions was to elect Barbara Cargill as chair and Lanet Greenhaw, vice president of education and workforce at the Dallas Regional Chamber, as vice-chair. The committee then reviewed examples of plans produced in Delaware, Indiana, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Texas State Demographer Dr. Lloyd Potter presented the committee with an overview of state demographics and how those trends may impact the public education system. Below are some highlights of the presentation to the committee.

According to Dr. Potter, Texas is experiencing urbanization characterized by people moving from rural areas to urban and suburban areas. Significant growth is also occurring in the suburban “rings,” a factor of migration out of urban cores as well as immigration from outside the state following employers to the suburbs. Dr. Potter pointed to Harris County as the most significant growing county in the nation, with roughly a dozen counties in the national top 100. Texas also is home to three of the top ten fastest growing counties in the United States. California is the top state contributing migrants to Texas, comprising 22.1 percent of the net migration from out of state.

In 2000, Hispanics comprised 32 percent of the state’s total ethnic makeup. By 2015, Hispanics comprised 39 percent. During the same period, the percentage of non-Hispanic whites roughly held steady. Much of the non-Hispanic white population consists of Baby Boomers, who are now in their 60s and 70s. Older cohorts in the Boomer age range comprise a larger percentage of the overall population each year. Across all nationalities, cohorts of school-age children are increasing year-over-year.

Using data from 2010 to 2015, projected population growth has slowed compared to previous models. Dr. Potter hypothesized this could be a result of reduced immigration from Mexico and declining fertility rates. According to the newer calculations, Texas could reach a population of just under 29 million by 2020. While the number of people who primarily speak Spanish at home has increased slightly, the percentage of school-aged children from primarily Spanish-speaking households has decreased. The percentage of children from households below the federal poverty level has slightly decreased. Looking at the labor force, low-skilled, low wage jobs are declining as high-skilled, high wage jobs are increasing as a share of the overall workforce. This is accompanied by increases in educational attainment, with the number of college graduates increasing compared to a decrease in workers with a high school diploma or less.

Among the more troubling statistics shared by the demographer today, Texas is one of the worst states in terms of teen births. Texas is ranked number five out of 50 states, ahead of only Arkansas, Oklahoma, Mississippi, and New Mexico. Dr. Potter suggested there is a direct correlation between high teen birth rates and high levels of poverty. Additionally, adult obesity in Texas is on the rise.

Following the presentation by Dr. Potter, the committee moved on to prioritizing topics for deep dive discussions. Future-readiness, equity, poverty, teacher recruitment and retention, alternative certification, family and parent empowerment, parent education, early learning, numeracy and literacy, access, additional measures of accountability, and readiness to participate in the global economy were among the topics identified by members of the committee as important leverage points for improving public education.

The committee is next scheduled to meet November 6 at the American Institutes for Research (AIR) in Austin.