Author Archives: Mark Wiggins

House committee wraps up hearings with educator prep bill

The House Public Education Committee met Thursday morning for the last public meeting of the legislative session. Saturday is the deadline for House committees to report Senate bills (SBs), which means any SBs that are not considered and voted out of the committee by then are procedurally dead.

ATPE member Stephanie Stoebe testifies before the House Public Education Committee, May 18, 2017.

ATPE member Stephanie Stoebe testifies before the House Public Education Committee, May 18, 2017.

The committee also voted out the following bills:

  • SB 1005, which would allow the use of the SAT or the ACT as a secondary exit-level assessment instrument to allow certain public school students to receive a high school diploma.
  • SB 1122, which would create a mechanism to abolish Dallas County Schools. State Reps. Alma Allen (D-Houston) and Joe Deshotel (D-Beaumont) voted against the bill.
  • SB 1353, which would put in place a process for dealing with the facilities of certain annexed districts.
  • SB 1483, which would establish a grant program to implement a technology lending program to provide students with electronic instructional materials.
  • SB 1658, which would make changes to laws regarding the ownership, sale, lease, and disposition of property and management of assets of an open-enrollment charter school.
  • CSSB 2131, which would add requirements to counseling regarding postsecondary education, encouraging a focus on dual credit programs.
  • SB 1963, which would allow non-classroom teacher certification observations to be held on the candidate site or through video technology. Vice-chair Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) voted against the bill.
  • SB 2144, which would create a commission to recommend improvements to the public school finance system.

SB 1786, which would prohibit charter school employees from unionizing, failed on a vote of five to four. Reps. Bernal, Allen, Deshotel, and Lance Gooden (R-Terrell) voted against the bill.

The first bill heard Thursday was SB 2095 by state Sen. Bob Hall (R-Edgewood), which would change the regulation of UIL students who may have been prescribed medical steroids because of a medical condition. The bill would allow the league to ban a student who is undergoing steroid treatment if the league believes there is a safety or fairness issue. Critics of this bill argue it targets LGBTQ students.

SB 1981 by state Sen. Charles Schwertner (R-Georgetown) would set in statute rules regarding how the University Interscholastic League (UIL) selects locations for statewide competitions. The bill would order UIL to periodically issue a statewide request for proposals from institutions of higher education and other appropriate entities seeking to host statewide competitions.

SB 801 by state Sen. Kel Seliger (R-Amarillo) would add a requirement that textbooks approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) are “suitable for the subject and grade level” and “reviewed by academic experts in the subject and grade level.”

SB 1177 by state Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) would expand the statute providing the ability of juvenile correctional or residential facilities to be granted a charter to include entities that contract with a juvenile correctional or residential facility.

SB 1659 by Senate Education Committee Chairman Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood) would allow the TEA commissioner to accept gifts, grants, or donation on behalf of the public school system and use them the way the commissioner sees fit. SB 1659 would allow the commissioner to transfer funds from the Charter School Liquidation Fund to a competitive grant program to promote “high-quality educational programs” and authorize the commissioner to establish rules to ensure that schools are in compliance with state funded grants. According to the fiscal note, SB 1659 could cost $12.3 million per biennium, but may be paid for through donations.

CSSB 1278 also by Chairman Larry Taylor would significantly reduce the standards for new teacher certification, and ATPE opposes the bill. First, SB 1278 would limit the number of in-person support visits to teacher candidates during their clinical training. This would reduce the opportunities to coach candidates in the best instructional methods and to provide feedback and support that is immediate, which ATPE members share is the most meaningful to their preparation and development. While virtual observations can be valuable as supplemental training tools, they should not be viewed as a substitute for in-person training and mentorship.

The bill would also differentiate among candidates training to teach in shortage areas by lowering the accountability standard for educator preparation programs that teach these students. Exhaustive research has been done on addressing teacher shortages around the nation, and multiple studies have identified high-quality preparation and induction as key factors in retaining educators.

ATPE member and 2012 Secondary Teacher of the Year Stephanie Stoebe testified against SB 1278 this morning, noting that rigorous teacher preparation programs are critical to ensuring high quality educators are in the classroom. We must ensure that all Texas educators receive strong preparation, meet quality certification standards, and are prepared by programs held to high accountability standards. This is especially true in the fields identified as areas of teacher shortage, which include special education, bilingual education, math, science, and computer science. According to the fiscal note, SB 1278 would cost roughly $631,000 through the biennium ending August 31, 2019.

House Public Education advances another round of SBs

The House Public Education Committee met for a formal hearing after Wednesday’s floor session in order to advance a number of Senate bills. The committee approved the following items Wednesday evening:

  • SB 195, which would allow additional transportation allotment funding to districts with children living within the two mile zone who are at a high risk of violence if they walk to school.
  • SB 196, which would require parental notification when a campus lacks a nurse, school counselor, or librarian.
  • SB 384, which would give the State Board of Education (SBOE) flexibility in scheduling end-of-course exams to avoid conflicts with AP/IB national tests.
  • SB 490, which would require a report on the number of school counselors at each campus.
  • CSSB 1398, which makes lots of clarifying and limiting changes to the classroom video camera law. Among them, the bill would require requests in writing and only require equipment in classrooms or settings in which the child is in regular attendance or to which the staff member is assigned.
  • SB 1484, which would create a web portal and instructional materials repository to assist schools in selecting open education resources. The bill provides for a third party to provide independent analysis regarding TEKS alignment.
  • SB 1566, which would hand broad powers to local school boards to compel the testimony of district officials and obtain district documents.  Vice-chair Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) voted against the bill.
  • CSSB 1660, which would allow districts to choose between using either minutes or days to calculate operation.
  • SB 1784, which would encourage the use of “open-source instructional materials.”
  • CSSB 1839, which would create a certification for early childhood through grade three, and would grant the commissioner authority to set reciprocity rules regarding the ability of teachers from outside the state to obtain a certificate in Texas.
  • SB 1854, which would require district-level committees to review paperwork requirements annually and recommend to the board of trustees instructional tasks that can be transferred to non-instructional staff.
  • SB 1873, which would require a report on physical education provided by each school district.
  • SB 2039, which would develop instructional modules and training for public schools on the prevention of sexual abuse and sex trafficking.
  • SB 2188, which would specify that a student who is 18 or older in an off home campus instructional arrangement is a full-time student if they receive 20 hours of contact a week. Part-time would be defined as between 10 and 20 contact hours per week.
  • SB 2270, which would create a pilot program in ESC Region 1 to provide additional pre-K funding for low-income students.
  • SB 2078, which would require TEA develop a model multi-hazard emergency operations plan and create a cycle of review.

The committee is scheduled to meet Thursday morning to consider a handful of remaining Senate bills.

Graduation committees advance in House hearing

The House Public Education Committee met Tuesday morning to consider a large agenda of Senate bills as the session winds down. The committee also approved the following bills Tuesday evening:

  • CSSB 463, which was heard earlier in the day. The bill would extend individual graduation committees (IGCs) through 2019.
  • SB 436, the Senate companion to HB 4226, which would require meetings of the Special Education Continuing Advisory Committee to be conducted in compliance with open meetings laws.
  • CSSB 529, the Senate companion to HB 2209, which would incorporate “universal design for learning” into the required training for all classroom teachers.
  • SB 585, the Senate companion to HB 545, which would require principals to allow “patriotic societies” such as Boy Scouts to speak to students about membership at the beginning of the school year.
  • SB 748, the Senate companion to HB 4027, which would add additional guidelines to the transition plan for special education students preparing to leave the public school system.
  • CSSB 1481, the Senate companion to HB 4140, which would rename the instructional materials allotment (IMA) the “instructional materials and technology allotment” and require districts to consider “open education resources” before purchasing instructional materials.
  • SB 1942, the Senate companion to HB 1692, which would allow a licensed handgun owner to store a firearm in a vehicle parked in the parking lot of a public school, open-enrollment charter school or private school. State Reps. Alma Allen (D-Houston) and Joe Deshotel (D-Beaumont) voted against the bill.
  • SB 2080, the Senate companion to HB 69, which would require each school district and open-enrollment charter school to include in the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) report the number of children with disabilities residing in a residential facility who are required to be tracked by the Residential Facility Monitoring (RFM) System and are receiving educational services from the district or school.

The meeting began with SB 1566 by state Sen. Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham), which would hand broad powers to local school boards to compel the testimony of district officials and obtain district documents. It would also require the Texas Education Agency (TEA) develop a website for boards to review campus and district academic achievement data.

House Public Education Committee meeting May 16, 2017.

House Public Education Committee meeting May 16, 2017.

SB 2131 by state Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas) would add requirements to counseling regarding postsecondary education, encouraging a focus on dual credit programs. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1294 by state Sen. Dawn Buckingham (R-Lakeway) would prohibit “exclusive consultation,” ensuring that educators on campus-level advisory committees do not all belong to a single professional association. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1660 by Sen. Taylor would allow districts to choose between using either minutes or days to calculate operation. According to the fiscal note, SB 1660 could cost the state $1.7 million through the biennium ending August 31, 2019.

SB 195 by state Sen. Sylvia Garcia (D-Houston) would allow additional transportation allotment funding to districts with children living within the two mile zone who are at a high risk of violence if they walk to school. In the fiscal note, the Legislative Budget Board indicated that there is insufficient data regarding the number of students who are at risk of violence to be able to calculate a fiscal impact. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1854 by state Sen. Carlos Uresti (D-San Antonio) would require district-level committees to review paperwork requirements annually and recommend to the board of trustees instructional tasks that can be transferred to non-instructional staff. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 384 by state Sen. Konni Burton (R-Colleyville) would give the State Board of Education (SBOE) flexibility in scheduling end-of-course exams to avoid conflicts with AP/IB national tests.

SB 1883 by Sen. Campbell would modify the approval process for charter applicants and the review of charter operators. ATPE opposes the bill because the removal of elected officials from the charter school process is irresponsible. Adding unnecessary new appeal and review opportunities for charters only creates administrative bloat.

SB 1005 by state Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels) would allow the use of the SAT or the ACT as a secondary exit-level assessment instrument to allow certain public school students to receive a high school diploma. The fiscal note estimates an annual cost of $2 million per year.

SB 1839 by state Sen. Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola) would create a certification for early childhood through grade three, and would grant the commissioner authority to set reciprocity rules regarding the ability of teachers from outside the state to obtain a certificate in Texas. ATPE believes that the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC), as the official state body charged with the oversight of educator standards, is the more appropriate authority to set these rules.

SB 2270 by Sen. Lucio would create a pilot program in ESC Region 1 to provide additional pre-K funding for low-income students.

SB 1784 by Sen. Taylor would encourage the use of “open-source instructional materials.”

SB 2188 by Sen. Taylor would specify that a student who is 18 or older in an off home campus instructional arrangement is a full-time student if they receive 20 hours of contact a week. Part-time would be defined as between 10 and 20 contact hours per week. According to the fiscal note, SB 2188 would cost roughly $7 million through the next biennium. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 463 by state Sen. Kel Seliger (R-Amarillo) would extend individual graduation committees (IGCs) to 2019 and order the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to compile a report tracking the progress of IGC graduates. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 2039 by state Sen. Judith Zaffirini (D-Laredo) would develop instructional modules and training for public schools on the prevention of sexual abuse and sex trafficking. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1483 by Sen. Taylor would establish a grant program to implement a technology lending program to provide students with electronic instructional materials. The program would be funded through instructional materials fund. The fiscal note anticipates no additional cost, but indicated the commissioner could use up to $25 million of existing funds from the instructional materials fund each biennium.

SB 1398 by Sen. Lucio makes lots of clarifying and limiting changes to the classroom video camera law. Among them, the bill would require requests in writing and only require equipment in classrooms or settings in which the child is in regular attendance or to which the staff member is assigned.

SB 1122 by state Sen. Donald Huffines (R-Dallas) would create a mechanism to abolish Dallas County Schools, one of two remaining county school districts in the state, which primarily provides transportation services to multiple independent school districts in the Dallas area.

SB 1886 by state Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston) would create an office of the inspector general at TEA appointed by the commissioner to prevent and detect criminal activity in districts, charter schools, and education service centers (ESCs). The bill would allow the new TEA inspector general to issue subpoenas in order to secure evidence.

SB 490 by state Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville) would require a report on the number of school counselors at each campus. ATPE supports this bill.

SB 1484 by Sen. Taylor would create a web portal and instructional materials repository to assist schools in selecting open education resources. The bill provides for a third party to provide independent analysis regarding TEKS alignment. According to the fiscal note, SB 1484 would not require additional state funding, but would result in an additional cost of $1.85 million in fiscal year 2018 and $450,000 in subsequent years that would be paid from existing instructional materials funding.

SB 1658 by Sen. Taylor would make changes to laws regarding the ownership, sale, lease, and disposition of property and management of assets of an open-enrollment charter school.

SB 2078 by Sen. Taylor would require TEA develop a model multi-hazard emergency operations plan and create a cycle of review. The fiscal note anticipates a fiscal impact of roughly $215,000 per year.

SB 2144 by Sen. Taylor would create a commission to recommend improvements to the public school finance system. ATPE supports this bill.

House continues clearing out Senate education bills

House Public Education Committee meeting May 11, 2017.

House Public Education Committee meeting May 11, 2017.

The House Public Education Committee advanced another raft of Senate bills while the House was in session Thursday afternoon. The committee approved the following measures today:

  • SB 1837, the Senate companion to HB 3231, which would exempt charters operated by a public senior college or university from being assigned a financial accountability rating under Section 39.082(e)
  • SB 489, the Senate companion to HB 3684, would add instruction to prevent the use of e-cigarettes to the tobacco prevention section of the duties of the local school health advisory committee.
  • SB 601, which would allow charter schools to be exempt from paying municipal drainage fees. State Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston) voted against the bill.
  • CSSB 725, the Senate companion to HB 367, which would expressly allow schools to donate surplus unserved cafeteria food to hungry children on campus through a third-party non-profit. A committee substitute included language from a “food shaming” bill by state Rep. Helen Giddings (D-DeSoto) that was pulled from the local calendar on Wednesday.
  • SB 754, the Senate companion to HB 878, which would allow districts to extend depository contracts for three additional two year terms as opposed to two, and to modify the contract for any extension.
  • SB 1051, which would create a driver education course for the deaf or hard of hearing and create a fee for the course.
  • SB 1152, which would create an excused absence for a student to pursue enlistment in the armed services or the Texas National Guard, similar to the way in which students may currently be excused to visit a college or university.
  • SB 1153, which would guarantee a parent’s right to information regarding intervention strategies for children with learning difficulties.
  • SB 1318, the Senate companion to HB 2014, which would allow the TEA commissioner to designate a campus as a “mathematics innovation zone.” Such a campus would be exempt from accountability interventions for two years and would be allowed to use a “pay for success” program approved by the commissioner. The bill sets up a framework for creating such pay for success programs funded by private investors.

Members met again Thursday evening to pass SB 22, which would replace the current tech-prep program with a Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) program.

The committee is next expected to meet on Tuesday, but Chairman Dan Huberty (R-Houston) told members to expect more formal meetings to vote on individual bills.

Texas House approves SB 7 misconduct bill

On Tuesday, the Texas House passed Senate Bill (SB) 7, the educator misconduct bill passed by the Senate last month. Several amendments were attached to the bill Monday on the House floor, including one that would withhold the pensions of school employees convicted of certain sexual offenses, including inappropriate relationship between an educator and student.

State Rep. Tony Dale (R-Cedar Park) attached two amendments. One added parental notification requirements laid out in HB 218, which was heard in March by the House Public Education Subcommittee on Educator Quality. The other required public school employees to disclose any criminal misconduct charges or convictions on a pre-employment affidavit based on HB 1799.

State Rep. Matt Rinaldi (R-Irving) added an amendment to strip the pensions of public school employees convicted of felony sexual offenses. State Rep. Gary VanDeaver (R-New Boston) amended the amendment by ensuring the full pension amount would be able to go to an innocent spouse instead.

The House approved SB 7 on second reading Monday, then again on third reading and final passage Tuesday by a vote of 146-0. The bill will now be returned to the Senate as amended, and the Senate will have the option to either concur with the House amendments or appoint members to a conference committee.

House Public Education shifts focus to Senate bills

The House Public Education Committee met Tuesday morning to consider a handful of Senate bills. Monday was the deadline for House committees to refer House bills, so the committee is limited to considering Senate bills for the remainder of session.

House Public Education Committee meeting May 9, 2017.

House Public Education Committee meeting May 9, 2017.

The hearing began with SB 1051 by state Sen. Kirk Watson (D-Austin), which would create a driver education course for the deaf or hard of hearing and create a fee for the course.

SB 1152 by state Sen. Jose Menéndez (D-San Antonio) would create an excused absence for a student to pursue enlistment in the armed services or the Texas National Guard, similar to the way in which students may currently be excused to visit a college or university. The bill is similar to HB 1270, which the committee approved in March.

SB 725 by state Sen. Borris Miles (D-Houston) would expressly allow schools to donate surplus unserved cafeteria food to hungry children on campus through a third-party non-profit. This is the Senate companion to HB 367 by Vice-chair Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio), which was approved by the committee in March and passed by the full House in April.

SB 601 by state Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels) would allow charter schools to be exempt from paying municipal drainage fees. The state, counties, municipalities, and school districts are exempt under current law.

SB 1153 by Sen. Menéndez would guarantee a parent’s right to information regarding intervention strategies for children with learning difficulties.

SB 1166 by state Sen. Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston) would subject the Harris County Department of Education to sunset review as if it were a state agency. State Rep. Alma Allen (D-Houston) praised the department’s progress and expressed concern that the bill would open HCDE to the possibility of being shut down. Rep. Allen asked members to oppose the bill. Chairman Dan Huberty (R-Houston) noted that Dallas County Schools is also subject to the sunset process, and encouraged members of the committee to engage in a healthy discussion on the topic.

House Public Education advances Senate companion bills

The House Public Education Committee met during a noon recess Monday to vote on a pair of House bills and several Senate bills that are identical to House bills the committee has already passed. The committee unanimously approved the following:

  • CSHB 4226 by state Rep. Tomas Uresti (D-San Antonio), which would require meetings of the Special Education Continuing Advisory Committee to be conducted in compliance with open meetings laws. Iw would also order the committee to develop a policy to encourage public participation with the committee.
  • HB 1033, which would require the TEA to petition for a waiver of the annual alternative assessment of students with significant cognitive disabilities required under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). 
  • CSSB 179, the Senate companion to HB 306, the anti-cyberbullying bill. A committee substitute removed significant portions of the bill, including language that would have criminalized cyberbullying and would have prohibited bullying outside of school related activities.
  • SB 276, the Senate companion to HB 852, which would remove the cap on the number of individuals who can enroll in the adult high school and industry certification charter school pilot program. 
  • CSSB 587, the Senate companion to HB 539, which would allow the children of military service members to enroll full-time in the state virtual school network. 
  • SB 1404, the Senate companion to HB 2806, which would require school districts and open-enrollment charter schools to report to PEIMS the number and percentage of students enrolled in voluntary after-school and summer programs, along with the number of campuses that offer such programs.
  • SB 1634, the Senate companion to HB 1114, which would reduce the number of service days required of teachers in a district that anticipates providing less than 180 days of instruction, while preserving the teacher’s salary. 
  • SB 1882, the Senate companion to HB 3439, which would allow school districts to contract with a charter to operate a district campus and share teachers, facilities or resources. 
  • SB 1901, the Senate companion to HB 3381, which would order the governor to designate a Texas Military Heroes Day in public schools.

Monday is the final deadline for House committees to report House bills, which means any House bills that remain pending after Monday are procedurally dead. The committee is scheduled to meet 8:00 a.m. Tuesday to hear testimony on five Senate bills.

House Public Education revives bill regulating DOIs

The House Public Education Committee called an impromptu meeting Friday afternoon to vote on a pending bill and reconsider the vote on a bill that failed on Thursday.

House Public Education Committee meeting Friday, May 5, 2017.

House Public Education Committee meeting Friday, May 5, 2017.

The committee revived HB 3635 by state Rep. Matt Krause (R-Fort Worth), which failed on a 5-4 vote Thursday. The bill was passed upon reconsideration Friday by a vote of 7-2. HB 3635 would require the commissioner to establish objective eligibility and performance standards, including academic and financial performance, for districts pursuing DOI status. Would require DOI plans to include performance objectives and allow the commissioner to terminate a DOI after a single unacceptable performance rating. Vice-chair Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) and state Rep. Lance Gooden (R-Terrell) voted against the bill.

The committee unanimously passed HB 4111 by state Rep. Alma Allen (D-Houston), which would allow an open-enrollment charter school that has been rated lower than satisfactory solely due to a data error reported by the charter to PEIMS to have its rating corrected.

The committee is expected to next meet Tuesday morning to discuss five Senate bills.

House Public Education Committee passes final House bills

The House Public Education Committee met during a break in floor activity Thursday afternoon to vote on the final set of House bills before Monday’s committee referral deadline. The committee approved the following:

Texas House of Representatives stands adjourned as committees meet, May 4, 2017.

Texas House of Representatives stands adjourned as committees meet, May 4, 2017.

  • HB 588, which would establish a grant program for promoting computer science certification and professional development for teachers.
  • CSHB 1023, which would allow the TEA commissioner to grant more than one charter for an open-enrollment charter school to a charter holder if the additional charter is for an open-enrollment charter school that serves a distinct purpose or student population. The bill passed 7-3, with state Rep. Harold Dutton (D-Houston) and state Rep. Lance Gooden (R-Terrell) voting against.
  • HB 1585, which would require a district include student input in the local instructional plan process.
  • HB 1651, which would replace the current classroom supply reimbursement program, which is subject to appropriation and not guaranteed, with a blanket $200 reimbursement per teacher per school year.
  • HB 2010, which would require the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to make information available regarding workplace safety training that may be included as part of a district’s curriculum for grades 7 through 12.
  • HB 2014, which would allow the TEA commissioner to designate a campus as a “mathematics innovation zone.”
  • HB 2093, which would order TEA conduct a study and issue a report to determine the most appropriate method for including the performance of gifted and talented students in determined school accountability.
  • HB 2519, which would order a study on dropout prevention and recovery for students who drop out before entering the ninth grade.
  • HB 2537, which would require a school counselor to inform a parent or guardian of the availability of education and training vouchers and tuition and fee waivers to attend an institution of higher education for a student who is or was in the conservatorship of the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS).
  • HB 2775, which would allow non-classroom teacher certification observations to be held on the candidate site or through video technology. The bill passed on a vote of 10-1.
  • HB 3244, which would allow a district to provide a salary bonus “or similar compensation” to a teacher who completes autism training through a regional education service center.
  • CSHB 3347, which would allow districts to establish before-school or after-school programs, but prohibit them from using state or local funds appropriated to the district for educational purposes to support such a program.
  • HB 3632, which would extend the timeframe for requesting a special education due process hearing for the child of a service member.
  • HB 3767, which would require a local school board to annually certify with TEA that the local board has established the required district- and campus-level committees.
  • HB 3800, which would specify that an open-enrollment charter school is a political subdivision for the purposes of Chapter 617, Government Code, which prohibits strikes and collective bargaining by public employees. The bill passed on a vote of 9-2, with Vice-Chair Diego Bernal (D-San Antonio) and Rep. Gooden voting against.
  • CSHB 4140, which would rename the instructional materials allotment (IMA) the “instructional materials and technology allotment” and require districts to consider “open education resources” before purchasing instructional materials. The bill passed on a vote of 8-3, with Rep. Gooden, state Rep. Ken King (R-Canadian) and state Rep. Gary VanDeaver (R-New Boston) voting against.
  • HB 4151, which would transfer responsibility for reporting bacterial meningitis information from TEA to the Department of State Health Services (DSHS).
  • CSSB 826, which would loosen sequencing for advanced English and mathematics courses.
  • SB 160 (HB 713), which would end the de facto “cap” on special education enrollment unveiled by the Houston Chronicle.
  • SB 579 (HB 1583), which would extend epinephrine auto-injector regulations, privileges, grant eligibility and immunity from liability to private schools.
  • SB 671 (HB 1451), which would require SBOE adopt criteria to allow a student to earn one of the two foreign language credits required for high school graduation by successfully completing a dual language immersion program at an elementary school.
  • SB 1480 (HB 467), which would adjust the language regarding the capacity available to charter holders under the bond guarantee program to back bonds with the Permanent School Fund (PSF).

The committee failed to pass CSHB 3635, which would require the commissioner to establish objective eligibility and performance standards, including academic and financial performance, for districts pursuing DOI status. Vice-Chair Bernal, Rep. King, Rep. Gooden and Rep. Dutton voted against the bill, which failed in a 5-4 vote.

The committee will next meet Tuesday morning at 8:00 a.m. to hear Senate bills.

House Public Education approves dozen more bills

The House Public Education Committee advanced another series of bills in a formal meeting Wednesday evening. The following bills were approved unanimously:

House Public Education Committee votes on bills, May 3, 2017.

House Public Education Committee votes on bills, May 3, 2017.

  • CSHB 194, which would require the State Board of Education (SBOE) to create a special education endorsement.
  • HB 1042, which would expand a parent’s right to request their student be allowed to take home instructional materials.
  • HB 1553, which would allow a district that fails to meet standard to enter into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with an institution of higher education in order to help improve the district’s performance.
  • CSHB 1847, which would require a school to notify parents if there is not a full-time nurse on the campus.
  • CSHB 2806, which would require school districts and open-enrollment charter schools to report to PEIMS the number and percentage of students enrolled in voluntary after-school and summer programs, along with the number of campuses that offer such programs.
  • CSHB 2884, which would expand the requirement for daily physical activity in elementary school from four semesters to six.
  • CSHB 3044, which would allow a candidate for teacher certification to obtain credit for the required 15 hours of field-based experience by simply observing a certified teacher or by serving as a substitute teacher up to two years prior to or subsequent to admission in an educator preparation program.
  • CSHB 3231, which would exempt charters operated by a public senior college or university from being assigned a financial accountability rating under Section 39.082(e).
  • HB 3251, which would remove language from statute that makes the adjustment for rapid decline in taxable value of property in a school district subject to appropriation.
  • CSHB 3434, which would require TEA adopt uniform general conditions adopted by the Texas Facilities Commission for use in all building construction contracts made by school districts.
  • CSHB 3437, which would order the TEA to develop a special education recovery program for the benefit of students negatively affected by the special ed “cap.”
  • HB 3573, which would remove the exemption from municipal zoning ordinances governing public schools for charters in small municipalities from charters adjacent to a large municipality.
  • HB 3684, which would add instruction to prevent the use of e-cigarettes to the tobacco prevention section of the duties of the local school health advisory committee.
  • CSHB 4027, which would add additional guidelines to the transition plan for special education students preparing to leave the public school system.

Members are expected to meet again Thursday in order to vote on remaining legislation left pending before the committee.