Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 23, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Welcome back! A new school year has begun for students and teachers across the state, and all the hard work of buying school supplies and prepping classrooms can finally be put to use. While much attention has been paid to House Bill 3, the school finance reform bill that passed earlier this year, many other bills came out of the 2019 legislative session that educators should get to know.

This week, the ATPE lobby team launched a series called “New School Year, New Laws” here on our Teach the Vote advocacy blog. As a complement to the many other outstanding resources ATPE shares with our members to help them understand their rights and responsibilities as educators, we’re using this new blog series to point out some of the bills going into effect this school year that could have an impact on educators and students. Read our first post in the series here to learn about some new legislation taking effect regarding student discipline. Then check back with TeachtheVote.org every Monday for new posts about education-related bills that passed earlier this year.


ELECTION UPDATE: Earlier this week, Gov. Greg Abbott announced a special election to replace Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston) who will be resigning at the end of September. While special election dates also have been set to fill other seats being vacated, with some taking place on the same day as this November’s constitutional amendment election, several legislators are announcing their intent to run for re-election. Read the latest election-related updates in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins, and watch for more updates in the weeks to come as campaign season ramps up. Back to school can be a busy time for educators. With the registration deadline of Monday, October 7, just six short weeks away, don’t forget to make sure your voter registration is active in time to vote in this November’s election!


The 2019 Texas legislative session was dubbed the “Session of the Teacher” – and it showed. Legislators in both the House and Senate worked together to pass bills that will send billions of dollars to public schools (like House Bill 3) and help shore up the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) (via Senate Bill 12). To keep up the momentum of this year’s session and promote future legislation that benefits public schools, ATPE encourages educators and other public education supporters to share their thanks and feedback with their elected officials. ATPE members can log into Advocacy Central to send a quick and easy thank you message to their legislators and urge their continued dedication to public education. There is still a lot of work to do to ensure the best for our students and educators!


In its latest installment of “HB 3 in 30,” the Texas Education Agency (TEA) has released two new videos, one addressing the topic of the Small/Midsized District allotment and another concerning college, career, and military readiness (otherwise known as CCMR) in high schools. Links to all videos in the series can be found here.

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Texas election news roundup: Aug. 22, 2019

This week’s election news continues with another special election added to the November 5, 2019, ballot. For most Texans, this November’s election will be about voting on one of 10 proposed constitutional amendments. However voters in a handful of districts will be deciding who represents them for the rest of the current legislative term, which ends January 2021.

The governor ordered a November 5 special election to fill the unexpired term of state Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston), who plans to resign at the end of September. House District (HD) 148 is a reliably Democratic district that elected Farrar by a 36-point margin in 2018. Beto O’Rourke won the district by nearly 39 percentage points. Other special elections on the November 2019 ballot include races to finish the unexpired terms of state Reps. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) and Eric Johnson (D-Dallas), who was elected mayor of Dallas recently.

Alongside retirement announcements, a number of legislators have gone out of their way to announce they plan on returning next session. Most notably, state Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-Lubbock) announced plans to run for reelection in 2020 with the endorsement of Gov. Greg Abbott. Burrows was chair of the House Republican Caucus until he resigned in the wake of the ongoing scandal over an alleged “hit list” of fellow Republicans and a recorded conversation between Burrows, Speaker Dennis Bonnen (R-Angleton), and Empower Texans provocateur Michael Quinn Sullivan.

State Reps. Lynn Stucky (R-Sanger), Garnet Coleman (D-Houston), and James Talarico (D-Hutto) also announced they intend to run for reelection. Stucky won reelection to HD 64 by eight percentage points, but O’Rourke narrowly edged Sen. Ted Cruz in that district by less than a percent. Gov. Abbott also issued his endorsement of Stucky’s reelection bid. Coleman’s HD 147 is a Democratic safe seat, but Talarico’s HD 52 was a recent flip. Talarico edged out his Republican opponent by just over three points in order to succeed Republican Rep. Larry Gonzales. Talarico underperformed O’Rourke, who posted a 12-point margin in the district.

As always, it is critical that educators stay engaged. Election season begins with November’s constitutional election and special elections, then party primaries begin in March 2020. Most of the races in the November 2020 general election will be decided in the primaries. Now is a good time to check if you’re registered to vote, which you can do by using resources put together by the Texas Educators Vote coalition, of which ATPE is a member. Check out the coalition’s new website at TexasEducatorsVote.com.

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New School Year, New Laws: Student Discipline

As you re-enter the school building this year, it will be important to know how the more than 80 bills passed during the recent Texas legislative session will impact you and your students. Besides the obvious – the high-profile House Bill (HB) 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) offering many schools and educators additional funding and a potential salary bump – there were a number of other bills passed in 2019 that will affect areas such as student discipline, charter schools, safety, and testing.

ATPE’s lobbyists will be here on Teach the Vote blogging about major bills in these areas every Monday over the next few weeks as part of our “New School Year, New Laws” series. This week, we will discuss changes you will see in your school due to new discipline-related legislation.

Senate Bill (SB) 2432: Student behavior towards teachers

SB 2432 by Sen. Larry Taylor (R-Friendswood) allows for students who harass teachers to be removed to a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP). Harassment is defined in Section 42.07 of the Texas Penal Code in several ways, each with an overall intent to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, or embarrass another. This bill takes effect on Sept. 1, 2019.

SB 712/HB 363: Prohibiting aversive techniques on students

SB 712 by Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville) and HB 3630 by Rep. Morgan Meyer (R-Highland Park) are identical bills that prohibit the use of certain techniques on students that are meant to discourage recurring behaviors. These aversive techniques are defined in physical terms, such as inflicting pain on a student, as well as in social, emotional, and mental terms, such as verbally demeaning a student or using a timeout when such breaks are not a part of the student’s individualized education plan (IEP). This legislation does not affect a teacher’s ability to remove students under Texas Education Code Section 37.002, which allows teachers to remove students who are repetitively disruptive and limiting the learning of others. Both bills were effective immediately upon their passage earlier this year.

HB 692: Suspension of students who are homeless

HB 692 by Rep. James White (R-Hillister) prohibits a school district or charter school from placing a student who is homeless in out-of-school suspension, with certain exceptions for serious offenses. The bill allows the campus behavior coordinator to work with the district’s homeless liaison to help identify alternatives to out-of-school suspension for students who are homeless. This bill was also effective immediately upon passage.

HB 811: Discipline of students who are homeless

HB 811, also by Rep. White (R-Hillister), requires a school district board of trustees to include in their code of conduct certain provisions relative to students who may be homeless. Specifically, when determining student suspension, expulsion, or removal to a DAEP or Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP), consideration shall be given to whether a student is in the conservatorship of the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) or is homeless. This bill was effective immediately upon passage.

It is important for educators to know how this legislation will impact their rights as educators, their classroom practice, and their students’ rights. Please see the recently released To The Administrator Addressed correspondence from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) for more legislative changes affecting student discipline.


Be sure to watch for a new Teach the Vote blog post next week on more changes coming to your school as a result of the 2019 Texas legislative session.

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Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 16, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released its “A-F” accountability ratings for 2019 on Thursday. This year, ratings were released for both districts and campuses. Overall, the percentage of schools rated “A” or “B” has increased since last year. However, several school districts including Houston ISD (the state’s largest) have campuses that will either have to shut down or be run by the state as a result of failing performance that has continued under the new accountability system. ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier wrote about the ratings, the history of the A-F system in Texas, and what insight the new school grades may offer in this blog post. For additional coverage, check out this article from the Texas Tribune.


ELECTION UPDATE: Gov. Greg Abbott has set the date for special elections that will fill the seats vacated by Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) and Rep. Eric Johnson (D-Dallas). Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez and State Board of Education member Ruben Cortez (D-Brownsville) announced that they are seeking seats in the U.S. Senate and Texas Senate, respectively. To find out more about the upcoming special elections and campaign news, check out this post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has released another video in its “HB 3 in 30” series. This week’s video provides a detailed overview of the “Do Not Hire Registry” and the new reporting requirements for districts and private schools regarding educator misconduct, which now covers non-certified school employees, too. All previous HB 3 in 30 videos and a schedule of upcoming topics can be found here.


Beginning next week, the ATPE lobby team will publish the first in a series of blog posts about what changes you can expect this school year due to recently passed legislation. The series is entitled “New School Year, New Laws,” and it’s designed to help educators know what to expect from the changes made by lawmakers earlier this year. Check back at the beginning of next week here on Teach the Vote for our first post about student discipline-related bills and how they will impact you and your classroom.

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TEA releases 2019 “A-F” accountability ratings

On Thursday, August 15, 2019, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) issued a press release announcing the 2019 “A-F” accountability ratings for Texas public school districts and campuses. Last year, A-F ratings were available for school districts only. Yesterday marks the first time that A-F accountability grades have been shared for individual campuses, too. The foundation for the A-F accountability system was created in 2013 under House Bill (HB) 5. In 2015 and 2017, the system was modified through HB 2804 by Rep. Jimmie Don Aycock (R-Killeen) and HB 22 by Representative Dan Huberty (R-Houston), respectively.

The A-F system was highly controversial among the education community in large part because it places a label of “failure” on schools, students, and educators based on a narrow view of school success. Additionally, many factors that strongly influence the outcomes that are measured by the A-F testing and accountability system are outside the scope of what educators can control. These include generational poverty, food insecurity, homelessness, family status, and adverse childhood experiences. For the reasons, ATPE opposed the inclusion of A-F ratings in the public school accountability system throughout the multiple legislative sessions in which it was developed.

Keeping in mind the limitations of the A-F accountability system for substantiating broad conclusions about the performance or effectiveness of schools, educators, and students, the ratings do lend themselves to some observations that can be useful for stakeholders to review. For example, a preliminary analysis of school district ratings shows that charter districts tend to have more C’s, D’s, and F’s than traditional districts. Eighty-six percent of traditional districts had either an A or B rating, compared to only 56 percent of charter districts. In fact, the percentage of charters rated D and rated F was six times and four times the percentage of traditional districts, respectively. It does appear that districts have overall improved since last year in the number rated A and B.

At the campus level, charter ratings are also more heavily weighted towards D and F. However, the overall percentage of schools that are rated A or B has increased since last year. Additionally, Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath stated that he is, “particularly proud of the 296 high-poverty schools that achieved an A rating this year.” The commissioner, several lawmakers, and members of the State Board of Education (SBOE) held press events around the state yesterday related to the announcement of the ratings.

ATPE representatives also participated in a number of interviews with the media to discuss the A-F accountability grades. In one news story yesterday about the A-F ratings of schools around central Texas, ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins discussed the myriad additional factors beyond accountability grades that will need to be considered when measuring the future impact of this year’s major school finance and reform bill, House Bill 3.

Of course, much more information is needed to decipher the meaning and validity of these new A-F ratings. In the past, ATPE has urged caution in interpreting A-F ratings, especially due to their reliance on data from student test scores. The TXschools.gov website promoted by TEA is meant to help parents understand ratings and make comparisons. Stakeholders can find further resources from TEA here, including video presentations on each of the three domains used in the rating system. ATPE will continue monitoring the system and fighting to ensure that it is fair and meaningful to educators, school leaders, students, and parents.

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From The Texas Tribune: Three Texas school districts face state penalties after 2019 A-F grades released

Three Texas school districts face state penalties after 2019 A-F grades released” was first published by The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

San Antonio ISD’s Ogden Academy failed to meet academic standards but has a temporary reprieve from state penalties. Photo by Laura Skelding for The Texas Tribune

Three Texas school districts — including the state’s largest — will likely be forced to shut down their chronically underperforming schools or submit to state takeover, based on annual state ratings released Thursday morning.

Houston ISD, Shepherd ISD and Snyder ISD all have at least one school that failed state ratings for five or more years in a row, subjecting them to bruising state penalties created in 2015. School superintendents will be allowed to appeal their ratings by mid-September, and final decisions will be out by the end of the year.

While Houston ISD’s Kashmere High School, the state’s longest-underperforming school, soared from an F to a C this year, Wheatley High School failed to meet state academic standards for the seventh year in a row.

This is the second year that Texas has awarded letter grades to school districts and the first year for schools, replacing a previous pass/fail system. (Schools last year received numeric scores that could easily be translated into grades.) The grades are intended to represent students’ academic performance, based on standardized test scores and other factors such as graduation rates.

For superintendents and principals, the pressure to get a good report card is high: Texas has increased the stakes of the accountability system in recent years, promising harsh penalties for schools and districts that repeatedly underperform.

Schools that fail to meet state academic standards for more than four years in a row will be forcibly shuttered, or the state will take over their school districts.

This year, further raising those stakes, Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath instituted a policy change to count a D grade as “unacceptable” performance, which critics argue will only increase the number of schools facing state penalties.

Last year, Houston ISD was one of 92 school districts that received a waiver from state ratings, because of the damaging effects of 2017’s Hurricane Harvey on students’ academic performance. That waiver saved it last year. No similar waivers were offered this year.

Snyder ISD, in West Texas, and Shepherd ISD, north of Houston, were also at risk of state takeover, each with at least one school that had been failing for four years. Snyder’s junior high school and Shepherd’s elementary and intermediate schools received their fifth consecutive failing ratings this year.

The state offered school districts a life raft: Those that handed the management of their underperforming schools to a nonprofit, university or charter group could get a two-year pause from sanctions.

Without that life raft, at least six districts — Ector County ISD, Lubbock ISD, Hearne ISD, Austin ISD, Beaumont ISD and San Antonio ISD — would have been in trouble. Ogden Academy, one of San Antonio ISD’s elementary schools, received its sixth F in a row this year. But the district’s leaders handed over control of curriculum, hiring and other duties to the Relay Graduate School of Education, giving Ogden more time to improve.

Midland ISD’s Travis Elementary School, in West Texas, also received a fifth consecutive low rating, but it received an exception from the state because it will partner with IDEA, a charter district, in 2020.

But Houston, Snyder and Shepherd ISDs did not enter into partnerships and subsequently failed to improve the performance of their schools. In Houston, community members effectively blocked the school board from using the law, arguing that giving nonprofits or charters control of their low-performing schools would privatize public education.

Even if all of Houston ISD’s schools had improved, the district was looking at likely state takeover due to its dysfunctional school board. A recent preliminary state investigation recommended state education officials take over Houston ISD’s elected school board, plagued by infighting and scandals for years, and replace it with an appointed board of managers.

The move to letter grade ratings, with the higher stakes attached to them, is extremely controversial, especially among many educators.

They argue that letter grades are overly simplistic measures of a long list of complex metrics and mislead parents about the quality of a school or district. They also dislike how much the system is based on students’ standardized test scores, the only consistent statewide evaluation but one widely mistrusted to accurately depict whether students are learning.

Despite the criticism, lawmakers did little to adjust how the state assesses school districts in the legislative session that wrapped up in May.

State officials have argued that the letter grades are more accessible for parents who want to know how well their children’s schools are doing and that they allow the state to better keep tabs on underperforming schools. The state also has updated a public website intended to present the ratings in a more easily digestible way, including new tools that allow for comparisons among schools and districts.

“All of these tools are designed to provide as much transparency to administrators and school leaders, as well as to parents and members of the public,” Morath said at a recent media roundtable.

A higher percentage of school districts that received letter grades were awarded A’s and B’s this year, compared with last year. A smaller percentage of districts received C’s, D’s and F’s.

The grades for schools and districts are determined by ratings in three categories: student achievement, school progress and closing the gaps. Those categories measure how students perform on state tests, how much those scores have improved and how well schools are educating their most disadvantaged students.

 

This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2019/08/15/texas-schools-grades-accountability/.

 

Texas Tribune mission statement

The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

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Texas election news roundup

It’s another week and another round of election news in Texas.

Gov. Greg Abbott (R-Texas) has been busy setting special elections to finish the unexpired terms of legislators who have decided to step down before the next election. Voters will decide who succeeds state Reps. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) and Eric Johnson (D-Dallas) on November 5, 2019, which is also the date of the state constitutional election. The winners of those two races will have to turn around and defend their seats in the 2020 elections next year.

In the meantime, another Democrat has filed to run against U.S. Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) in the 2020 election. Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez is a Latina organizer who started the Workers Defense Project and Jolt Texas, the latter of which aims to mobilize young Hispanic voters. Ramirez will join a Democratic field that already includes state Sen. Royce West (D-Dallas), former congressional candidate MJ Hegar, and former congressman and gubernatorial candidate Chris Bell.

Finally, Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) Member Ruben Cortez (D-Brownsville) announced plans late last week to challenge state Sen. Eddie Lucio, Jr. (D-Brownsville), who has often sided with his Republican colleagues in the 31-member Texas Senate on issues such as school privatization. This sets up a potentially heated Democratic primary for the South Texas Senate district.

This November’s election will decide a number of important potential amendments to the Texas Constitution, including one relating to school finance. It is critical that educators stay engaged beginning this November and following through the party primaries in March 2020 — all the way to the November 2020 general election. Now is a good time to check if you’re registered to vote, which you can do by using resources put together by the Texas Educators Vote coalition of which ATPE is a member. Check out the coalition’s new website at TexasEducatorsVote.com.

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Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 9, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


With back to school starting for millions of Texas students, it is time once again for students and teachers alike to buy school supplies. This weekend is the annual Texas Sales Tax Holiday, or “tax-free weekend,” as it is sometime called. This year’s tax holiday begins today, August 9, and runs through Sunday, August 11. During the holiday you can avoid paying sales tax when you buy most clothing, footwear, school supplies, and backpacks (sold for less than $100) from a Texas retail store or from an online or catalog seller doing business in Texas. ATPE members can also use their OfficeMax/Office Depot discount this weekend for even more combined savings.

Teach the Vote readers may have also heard about a grass roots movement started by teachers called #ClearTheList. Teachers participating in #ClearTheList or #ClearTheListsTexas post school supply wish lists on social media platforms like Facebook or Twitter, and companies or individuals will “clear their list” by purchasing the school supplies for the teacher to use in their classroom. Hopefully the day will come when we fund public schools such that these types of school supply charity drives will not be necessary, but until then – never underestimate the ingenuity or tenacity of a Texas educator to serve his or her students! To participate, type #ClearTheList or #ClearTheListsTexas into the search bar of any social media platform.

 


The Texas Education Agency is continuing to do its deep dives on the myriad new policies created with the passage of House Bill 3 with the release of another video in its “HB 3 in 30” series. This week’s video will dive into the outcomes bonus based on college, career, and military readiness, otherwise known as CCMR. A list of all previous HB 3 in 30 videos, as well as a schedule of upcoming topics, can be found at this link.

 


The movement to repeal the federal Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP), which decreases the Social Security benefits of many hard-working Texas teachers, gained media attention this week. This article by Lorie Konish of CNBC highlights recently introduced legislation by Texas Congressman Kevin Brady (R-The Woodlands) and quotes ATPE Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter. Look for more from the press and ATPE as additional bills are filed in Congress and the movement to address the WEP heats up in Washington this fall.

 


The 86th legislative session may have just ended, but that means a new election season is already upon us. Each day it seems that additional lawmakers are announcing their plans to retire as new candidates are announcing their bids to run, either to replace incumbents or for a chance to fill newly opened seats.

Without question, the 2019 legislative session was influenced in a positive way by huge voter turnout among educators and public education allies. If it weren’t for that turnout in 2018, there would likely have been no talk of an increase in teacher pay in 2019. It is critically important for educators to stay engaged this election cycle in order to maintain and improve upon the gains that were made last session, but it is also important for educators and all public servants to make sure they are expressing their political views and encouraging civic engagement among their peers in ways that are ethical and legal.

Thankfully, the Texas Educators Vote coalition, working in coordination with ATPE, has published this handy dos and don’ts guide on civic engagement around Texas elections. As educators head back to school, they can feel confident exercising their right to free speech with the aid of this guide. ATPE encourages members to check out the guide and other resources available from Texas Educators Vote on the coalition’s newly updated website, and be sure to follow Teach the Vote this fall for election updates and information to help educators stay politically active and make informed choices at the polls.

 


ATPE joined legislators and advocates from around the country this week for the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) 2019 Summit in Nashville, Tennessee. This event draws together some of the brightest minds from the U.S. and abroad to discuss policy items of interest to state governments. Education is always a topic of lively discussion, and this year was no different.

Among the topics discussed were ongoing efforts to ensure all students are provided with an equally high quality of education, regardless of race or socioeconomic status. This continues to be a challenge in Texas and other states, where great disparities continue to exist both across and within school district boundaries. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 that laws passed to racially segregate schools were unconstitutional. Yet the Court’s decision in Milliken v. Bradley in 1974 essentially allowed segregation to continue as long as it is not explicitly intentional. The result has been de facto racial and socioeconomic segregation that continues in many parts of the state today, despite decades of efforts and lawsuits intended to achieve the original aim of integration.

Attendees also discussed efforts to improve the future of education, which includes working with employers to emphasize the role of the education system in creating the workforce of the future. How well we do at preparing future workers has a direct impact on the overall economy. Like Texas in 2018, many states have recently launched commissions to study ways to improve the public education system. The findings of these commissions are unsurprisingly similar to the results found by the Texas Commission on Public School Finance. For example, a commission launched by the state of Maryland found that investing in early education and better compensation for educators are both critical components of building a high-achieving education system. There is now a mounting body of evidence across the United States supporting these core determinations.


 

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Teach the Vote’s Week in Review: Aug. 2, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


With the passage of major bills like House Bill 3 on school finance and reform and House Bill 3906 on student testing during the recently concluded 86th legislative session, educators and other members of the public will have opportunities to serve on advisory committees as the bills are implemented. In correspondence to school administrators this week, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced a call for nominations to serve on the following five advisory committees, along with deadlines for nominations as shown below:

  • Reading Standards K-3 Advisory Committee – August 7, 2019
  • Special Education Allotment Advisory Committee – September 1, 2019
  • Compensatory Education Allotment Advisory Committee – August 12, 2019
  • Financial Aid Advisory Committee – June 1, 2020
  • Assessment Educator Advisory Committee – August 16,2019

Find more information on the committees, their requirements, and time commitments here.


Earlier this year, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) announced its launch of a resource website along with other explanatory materials aimed at helping the public understand House Bill 3, the school finance reform bill that passed during the 2019 regular legislative session this year. The latest releases in TEA’s video series entitled “HB 3 in 30” cover recapture and the move to current year property values and use of the fast growth allotment for purposes of school funding. Check out the latest TEA videos here.


ELECTION UPDATE:

This week saw another round of important developments concerning the 2020 elections, as ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins reports this week. State Rep. John Zerwas (R-Richmond) announced he is retiring from the Texas Legislature, where he chaired the House Appropriations Committee for the past two sessions. As the chief budget writer in the House, the appropriations chair is second only to the speaker in terms of political power, which makes Rep. Zerwas’s announcement significant. Zerwas won reelection against Democrat Meghan Scoggins by an eight percent margin in 2018, which puts his House District 28 among those considered “in play” in the 2020 general election.

U.S. Rep. Will Hurd (R-San Antonio) also announced this week he will not seek reelection to Congress. This announcement sent shockwaves through the national Republican Party, which has benefitted from Rep. Hurd’s ability to win in what is considered a Democratic-leaning congressional district. Hurd is also the only African-American Republican in the U.S. House. His retirement increases the prospects for Democrats hoping to take Congressional District 23 in 2020.

Even though the 2020 election seems far away, it’s important to remember that primary races are coming in March. The primary elections are still the races in which most of the political posts in Texas are decided. Texas Educators Vote, a coalition of public education supporters that includes ATPE, has launched a new website with information about how and where to vote. Check it out at TexasEducatorsVote.com and sign up to receive text and e-mail updates about election dates and information.


In case you missed our blog reporting last weekend, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met on July 26, 2019. Much of the meeting was devoted to consideration of rules to implement bills passed during the 86th legislative session that concluded earlier this year. Among the items on SBEC’s lengthy agenda were the plans for piloting of EdTPA portfolio assessments for educator certification, final adoption of changes to teacher assignment rules, and proposed modifications to requirements for admission to an educator preparation program.

For more on actions taken by the board in last week’s meeting, check out this comprehensive blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.


 

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Summary of SBEC’s meeting on July 26, 2019

On Friday, July 26, 2019, the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) met in Austin to take up a lengthy agenda that included approving rules to implement the EdTPA pilot program and discussing implementation of bills passed by the 86th Legislature, such as House Bill (HB) 3.

First, a note about SBEC procedure. Each agenda item that makes changes to rules takes three board meetings to move through SBEC. The board first brings up an item for discussion only, then formally proposes the rule at its next meeting and allows for a public comment period, and then finally adopts the rule at the third meeting. Additionally, under state law all adopted SBEC rules are subject to review by the elected State Board of Education (SBOE), which can take no action or veto a rule.

On Friday, SBEC approved two standard four-year rule reviews. The review of Title 19 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 233, which establishes the certificate classes for classroom teachers (e.g. 4-8 Science, Music EC-12, etc.), and the review of 19 TAC Chapter 244, which outlines the qualifications, training, and acceptable criteria for educator appraisers, were approved.

The board also adopted items that will now make their way to SBOE, including revisions to the criteria that school districts use to assign teachers. The assignment rules are based on the certificates held by teachers, which sometimes change, and the rules must also reflect the addition of new courses, such as Ethnic Studies. For instance, someone with an 8-12 History certification could be assigned to teach a high school Ethnic Studies classroom. Also headed to the SBOE are revisions to the program requirements for educator preparation programs (EPPs) that would create an optional, intensive pre-service preparation and certification pathway; provide guidance for EPP name changes after a change in ownership; and require educators seeking certification in two areas to have clinical teaching experience in both. Lastly, the board adopted revisions to certification and testing requirements including the incorporation of the new intensive pre-service option; including the portfolio assessment EdTPA as a testing option; and updating the fees to include EdTPA and the subject-matter-only assessments used for the Pre-Admission Content Test (PACT) route (discussed below). Interestingly, the board adopted an amendment proposed by board member Tommy Coleman to clarify in the rule language that the EdTPA assessment option is strictly a pilot.

Board members next took up agenda items for proposal of new rules and the authorization of a public comment period on those. One set of proposed rules includes changes to the Accountability System for Educator Preparation Programs (ASEP), which will provide for new commendations for high-performing EPPs; adopt the EPP accountability manual into rule; clarify how EPPs are accredited; allow SBEC to require an EPP to complete an action plan as a sanction for low performance; and make additional technical changes. Additionally, the Board proposed revisions to EPP admission requirements to implement Senate Bill (SB) 1839, HB 2039, HB 3349 that were passed by the 85th Legislature in 2017. The rule changes would add admission requirements for the Early Childhood through Grade 3 (EC-3) and Grades 6-12 Trade and Industrial Workforce Training certificates created by those bills. The revisions would also allow candidates to take subject-matter-only assessments for their PACT if they don’t have the commensurate coursework and minimum 2.5 GPA that is required to enter an EPP. Currently, candidates can gain admission through a content pedagogy test, which tests for teaching strategies that the candidate hasn’t been exposed to yet. These items will be eligible for public comment from August 23 to September 23, 2019, and published in the Texas Register.

Since the 86th Legislature just ended its session in May, SBEC must act quickly to approve changes in order to meet the implementation date of several bills that were passed this year. Therefore, a couple items on the board’s agenda went straight to the proposal stage, skipping the initial discussion phase in order to save time. These include rule changes to implement the following bills:

  • SB 1200 by Sen. Donna Campbell (R-New Braunfels), which allows for military spouses licensed in other states to teach in Texas.
  • HB 3 by Rep. Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood), which repeals the master teacher certificates as of September 1, 2019. Any candidate wishing to gain or renew a master teacher certificate must do so by August 30, 2019. Any current certificates will remain valid up until their expiration date. Please see the Texas Education Agency’s information on master teacher certificates here for more detail.

The Board also took action on two non-rule “board items,” which were discussed at the previous meeting and are effective immediately upon approval. One of these was to approve the ability of the Region 13 Education Service Center (ESC) to offer a Reading Specialist Certification, which is a different class of certification from the master teacher certification. The other item was to name members who will serve on an advisory committee for the newly proposed special education certifications. These certifications would improve upon the current, broad special education certificate by creating a deaf/blind supplemental certificate and multiple new certificates that are more specialized by grade level and the degree of support needed by students.

The following items had been up for discussion at Friday’s SBEC meeting but were moved instead to the board’s October meeting agenda:

  • Proposed changes to educator disciplinary proceedings, sanctions, and contested cases to implement the provisions of HB 3, SB 1230, SB 1476, and SB 37 as passed by the 86th Legislature. Collectively, these bills will impact reporting requirements for superintendents, principals, and directors of public and private schools regarding educator misconduct; create a do-not-hire registry; and remove student loan default as a ground for discipline by SBEC. The anticipated rule changes would also permit SBEC to deny certificates to educators who have abandoned their contract within the past 12 months. This will cover intern and probationary certificates, which SBEC loses jurisdiction over once these 12-month certificates expire.
  • A board item meant to allow the Board to discuss the EPP continuing approval process, which includes procedures for review and update of EPP standards and requirements.
  • A board item to discuss the upcoming educator certification test development updates to current content pedagogy tests. The Principal as Instructional Leader assessment was one of the updated tests and is set to become operational on July 29, 2019. Other new tests will roll out into 2021 and beyond.

The last agenda item, a legislative update, was skipped at Friday’s meeting because members agreed that it had been adequately covered in a July 25th SBEC work group session. Bills impacting SBEC rulemaking as passed by the 86th Legislature include HB 3, HB 18, HB 403, HB 2424, SB 37, SB 241, SB 1200, SB 1230, and SB 1476. All of these except for HB 3’s Science of Teaching Reading certification requirements are now set to be discussed at the October 4, 2019 SBEC meeting. See a detailed table of SBEC’s proposed timeline for implementing provisions of each of these bills here. Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for future updates.

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